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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 12. 



1904 



NO. I 



Published Fortnightly by Students .f the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

notify the Business M anager. - — — ' 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Edltor-in Chief. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. Business Manager. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES, 1906, Assistant Business Manager. 

KA_rn w«imi r EDWIN HOBART SCOTT. 1906, Intercollegiate. 

ALLEN NEWMAN SWAIN. "05. GEORGE HENRY CHAPMAN. 1906. Alumni Notes. 

PERCY FREDERIC WILLIAMS 1905. Department Notes. GEORGE ^ ^ ^ 

ALBERT DAVIS TAYLOR. 1905, College Notes. DAN 1ELS PHILBR1CK. 1907, Athletics. 

ARTHUR ALPHONSE RAC1COT, JR., 1906. 



-^^^^^T ^^Tsin*. Cop*., IOC T..**. ~*«^«***M^* <*""*■ ■*• **" 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate. 
Readlr.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. S. Walker. Pres. Athletic Association, 

E. W. Newhall, Jr., Manager. Base Ball Association, 

W. A. Munson. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Sii Indei. 

H. F. Thompson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. _. F. Howard, Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manager. 

F. H. Kennedy, Manager. 



Entered as secend-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 
ti\»\»' »\ v _%»\»«i»%, MMMIM, 



Edrt&ri&ls. 



The first issue of the Sicnal has been unavoidably 
delayed because of a number of vacancies on the 
editorial staff which had to be filled, and also because 
of the lateness of some members of the board in 
returning to college. 



The second volume of the College and Alumni 
News, published by the associate alumni, appeared 
during the latter part of the summer. It embraces 
about eighty pages, and besides containing college 
news items and alumni notes, it gives a very full 
account of the lives of Ex- President Stockbridge and 
of our late trustee Charles L. Flint. A copy of the 
publication was sent to every alumnus. 



for her honor and take her misfortunes, should she 
have any, to heart. You have your routine of college 
exercises to do and this you must attend to or suffer 
the penalty, but this is not your whole duty. A grad- 
uate gets his diploma on the basis of classroom marks 
it is true ; but after all that diploma represents only 
about one half of what the college has to give. So 
put your shoulder to the wheel and work. Don't 
become a mere book-worm ; but learn how to study 
and still have time for the pnper development of 
your moral, physical and sociai natures. In other 
u/nrds try to realize the object of a college course- 
to learn how to live. 



The Signal wishes to say a few words of advice to 
the Freshmen, the essence of which is— get into the 
midst of things. Don't look at the college as some- 
thing In which you have no interest ; but rather strive 



KAPPA SIGMA AT THE MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE- 

[From the Amherst Record, June 22, 1904.] 
The entry into the fraternity life of the College of 
a new element was an unusual concomitant of com- 
mencement. The D. G. K. fraternity, the oldest at 
the college, was gran'.d a charter by Kappa Sigma 



6- 

*2 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



about the middle of May, and the seventieth chapter, 
Gamma Delta, was instituted on Monday evening, 

June 1 -»th. 

Kappa Sigma has chapters in many of the larger 
institutions of the land, such as Cornell. Pennsylvania, 
Chicago, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, California 
and Leland Stanford universities. Its New England 
chapters, other than the new one. are located at 
Bowdoln, Brown, the Universities of Maine and Ver- 
mont and at New Hampshire State college. It is the 
largest Greek letter fraternity, in point of number of 
chapters, in the country. Its organization is thorough, 
and its administration and discipline complete. Kappa 
Sigma dates its origin farther back than its inaugura- 
tion into American colleges, and has a history that 
few American societies possess. In 1869 Dr. Holins- 
worth and Arnold, of the University of Virginia, while 
studying medicine in Paris, became acquainted with 
the existence of an ancient academic or university 
secret fraternity, called the " Kirjaith Sepher," which 
had been founded at the Universities of Bologna and 
Florence, Italy, about 1400, A. D., by a fugitive 
Greek scholar who was a professor in these institu- 
tions. Branches were also established in the Univer- 
sities of Montpellier. Orleans and Paris, in France. 
The society ultimately became extinct in Italy, except 
In the family of De Bardi. who handed down its tradi- 
tions. 

These American gentlemen visited a member of 
this family in Florence, and being initiated into the 
order, secured permission to establish It In America 
under the name of " K 2." 

TV Caduceus, a bi-monthly, is the official organ of 
the .laternity. A secret publication is also issued. 
Forty-six members of D. G. K. were initiated Mon- 
day evening, half undergraduates and half alumni, 
some of thirty-four year's standing and some of but a 
single year since graduation. The fraternity house 
and grounds on Lincoln avenue were decorated with 
flags and illuminated with transparencies, lanterns and 
colored lights. The initiatory and installation cere- 
monies were conducted by one of the grand officers. 
Dr. J. S. Ferguson, of the Cornell Medical faculty, 
assisted by a dozen representatives of the Maine. 
New Hampshire. Vermont, Cornell and Boston alumni 
chapters. The installation banquet at the Amherst 



House was attended by nearly sixty Kappa Slgmas, 
who made the welkin ring with songs, with the yells 
of the various colleges represented, as well as with the 
star and crescent yell, hitherto unheard in the Con- 
necticut valley. The way from the fraternity house 
to the hotel at 1 1-30 p. m. was made brilliant by green, 
white and red lights, the Kappa Sigma colors, while 
the return at 3 a. m. was illumined by the rays of 
the breaking dawn. 



/Uhletir Notts- 



Holy Cross, ; Massachusetts, 0. 
The football season opened Sept. 28 at Worcester. 
Our boys lined up against a team much heavier and 
with the benefit of two weeks' more practice than our 
boys had had. What our team lacked in weight it 
made up in aggressiveness. The outlook Is the most 
encouraging in years and too much credit cannot be 
given to Coach Bullock for the mann-jr in which the 
team is rounding into shape. Lewis, last year's half- 
back went into the game with but one day's practice 
and played his usual reliable game Cobb, a new 
man at quarter, ran the team with good judgment and 
got his punts off fairly well. 

The game started by Holy Cross kicking out of 
bounds. On the next attempt the ball went to Whlt- 
aker, on the fifteen-yard line, who ran it back ten 
yards. By line plunges Massachusetts gradually 
pushed the ball to the Holy Cross forty-yard line 
where it was lost on downs. 

Holy Cross utilized a cross-tackle play with fair 
success but was forced to punt on Massachusetts' 
fifty-yard line. Holy Cross' heavy line held and Cobb 
attempted to punt but a high pass lost us the ball on 
our thirty-yard line. After advancing the ball ten 
yards Reed attempted to kick a goal from the field. 
The ball was blocked, and when the scrimmage dis- 
solved Munson and a wearer of the purple were both 
claimants for the ball. The official gave Holy Cross 
the benefit of the doubt and Holy Cross had the ball 
on Massachusetts' five-yard line. After three 
attempts to gain, the ball was given to Carney who 
fumbled, and Cobb picked up the ball and made a 
spectacular run of forty yards. The half ended with 
the pigskin near the centre of the field. 



Martin kicked off to Larkin. who ran the ball back 
fifteen yards. Massachusetts held and Holy Cross 
punted outside. By fierce line plunges by Munson, 
Whitaker. and Lewis we pushed the ball to the Holy 
Cross twenty-yard line, where, after three attempts to 
gain, Cobb dropped back and tried for a goal from the 
field. The attempt was blocked and Holy Cross 
recovered the ball on their own fifteen-yard line. 
They punted out of' danger, and Massachusetts, failing 
to gain, sent the ball well into Holy Cross territory on 
a punt. The ball remained in Holy Cross territory 
for the remainder of the game. The features of the 
game were the secondary defense of Holy Cross and 
the playing of Lewis, Whitaker and Cobb for 
Massachusetts. 

Line up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Martin. 1. e. 
Gardner, 1. t. 
Carey, 1. g. 
Patch, c. 

Ladd (Cutter), r. g. 
Craighead, r. t. 
Philbrick, r, e. 
Lewis, 1. h. b. 
Whitaker, r. h. b. 
Munson (capt.). f. b. 
Cobb. q. b, 



HOLY CROSS. 

r. e., Campbell 

r. t., O'Donnell 

r. g., Cronin 

c. Callahan 

1. g.. Carney 

1. t., McCarthy 

1. e.. Ford 

r. h. b., Reed 

1. h. b.. Carrigan 

f. b.. McManus 

q. b., Larkin (capt.) 



Referee— W. H. Burke of W. P. 1. Umpire— Dr. W. J. 
Collins. Timer — E. W. Newhall. Jr. Linesmen — O'Neil 
and Rellby. Time — 15 min. halves. 

Dartmouth, 17; Massachusetts, 0. 

Oct. 1 the team met Dartmouth at Hanover and 
while they met defeat no one can say that Massachu- 
setts did not play plucky football. Outweighed in 
every position and battling against experienced and 
fresh men the team stuck to Its task with commend- 
able spirit. 

Martin kicked off to Main who swept up the field 
behind fine interference for 60 yards until Cobb alone 
remained in the way. Cobb managed to spill the 
runner and Lewis tackled him. Dartmouth tried the 
tackles for slight gains and finally began a steady 
attack on our right side of the line. Our line held In 
an admirable manner, causing the Dartmouth team 
to utilize all its downs to make the required distance. 
Slowly our line gave way as its heavy opponents 
charged through for small gains, and at last Main 



was shoved over for a touchdown. Main kicked an 
easy goal. 

We elected to receive the klckoff. and Gllman 
kicked to Whitaker on the 10-yard line. A few line 
plays failed and Cobb punted to Melvin. Again Dart- 
mouth banged our line for small gains and time was 
called with the ball on our 30-yard line. 

In the second half Dartmouth played many fresh 
men and our line gradually gave way before the 
rushes of the Dartmouth backs, and Coburn and Main 
were sent over during this half for touchdowns. Mun- 
son at fullback played a star game for Massachusetts, 
his hurdling being one of the features of the game. 

Line up : 



DARTMOUTH. 

Willard, I. e. 

Keady (Brown). 1. t. 

Cilman (McDonald). I. g. 

Farrier (Spoeninger), c. 

Clough (Bankart), r. g. 

Gage, r. t. 

Herr (Thomas, Marsh), r. e. 

Melvin (Glaze. McD'will), q. b. 

Main (Blatherwick). 1. h. b. 

Vaughan (Coburn, Dann). r. h. b. 

Knibbs (Conley), f. b. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. e., Philbrick (Tupper) 

r. L, Craighead 

r. g., Ladd (Cutter) 

c. Patch 

1. g.. Johnson 

1. t.. Gardner 

1. e., Martin 

q. b., Cobb 

r. h. b., Whitaker 

1. h. b., Lewis 

f. b., Munson 



Score — Dartmouth 17, Massachusetts 0. Touchdowns — 
Main 2. Coburn. Goals from touchdowns — Main 2. Umpire 
— Carleton. Referee — Barton. Linesmen — Grover of Dart- 
mouth, Tupper and Philbrick of Massachusetts. Timer — 
Bolser. Time— 10 min. halves. 

Massachusetts, 12; Williams 0. 

For the first time in the history of the college the 
royal purple went down before the men in maroon 
and white at Weston Field, Willlamstown. Wednes- 
day, Oct. 5. Massachusetts outplayed her opponents 
at all points of the game and Williams failed to make 
her distance until the latter part of the second half 
when a few short gains were made by a revolving 
tackle play. 

Williams kicked off to Cobb who ran the ball 50 
yards to Williams' 40-yard line. Massachusetts failed 
to gain and Cobb punted to Brown who returned it 10 
yards. Williams could not gain so Massachusetts 
again took the ball by short, steady rushes to Wil- 
liams' two-yard line and then sent Whitaker over the 
heads of the wearers of the purple for the first touch- 
down. After punting out to Whitaker, the goal was 



2<.f30 



— ^ 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 





THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



kicked by Cobb. Score, Massachusetts 6, Williams 
0. The remainder of the half was not especially 
eventful, although the ball was always In Williams' 
territory. The half ended with the ball in Massa- 
chusetts' possession on Williams' 30-yard line. 

The second half, Martin kicked off to Miller who 
made a short gain. The next play Williams fumbled 
and it was Massachusetts' ball. Using tactics similar 
to those employed In the first half, the ball was soon 
near the Williams' line and Lewis hurdled for the 
second touchdown. Cobb kicked the goal. Score, 
Massachusetts 12. Williams 0. Williams now made 
several substitutions. Marshall was put out for slug- 
ging and Alexander took his place. These fresh men 
added life to the team and for a few minutes they 
played as strongly as Massachusetts, making several 
good gains. However they could not get nearer to 
Massachusetts' goal than the 30-yard line. The 
game ended with the ball in Williams' possession on 
our 40 yard line. 

Both teams went into the game somewhat crippled 
by the loss of their captains Munson and Watson, but 
for Massachusetts Gardner captained the team well. 
There were no particular stars for Williams but the 
hurdling of Whltaker and Lewis and the quarterback 
work of Cobb for Massachusetts deserve mention. 

The line-up follows: 



MASSACHOSETTS. 

Martin. 1. e. 
Gardner. 1. 1. 
Carey. I. g. 
Patch, c. 
Ladd, r. g. 
"raighead, r. t. 
, up^sr, r, e. 
Cobb. q. b. 
Lewis, I. h. b. 
Whitaker. r. h. b. 
Philbrick. f. b. 

Score, Massachusetts 12. 
Coals from touchdowns — Cobb 2. 
Umpire — Easton. Timer — Seelye. 

Brown, 27 



WILLIAMS. 

e.. Stocking 



r. t. 



1-g. 



Marshall, Alexander 

r. g„ Eldridge, Bixby 

Cm Eldridge 

Campbell, Coodwille 

1. 1., Murray 

I. e., Elder 

q. b.. Miller 

r. h. b„ Hoyne, Wooster 

1. h. b.. Brown 

f. b., Criswold. Moffitt, Judson 

Touchdowns — Whitaker. Lewis. 
Referee — Dr. Collins. 
Time 15-min. halves. 



passed over in the last week and the long trip to 
Providence. Brown presented a strong team consid- 
erably heavier than Massachusetts, and with the ben- 
efit of a week's rest. Brown kicked off to Lewis who 
advanced the ball ten yards. After a few short gains 
Cobb punted fifty yards to Schwartz. By a steady 
attack on our tackles the ball was pushed to Massa- 
chusetts five-yard line where a brace was taken by 
the maroon and white clad boys. After three 
attempts to hold. Savage was pushed over for the first 
touchdown. Webb failed to kick a difficult goal. 
Martin kicked off to Schwinn who placed the ball on 
the 40-yard line, An end run netted 10 yards and 
then Webb broke through our line and went down the 
field for the second touchdown. Webb again failed 
to kick the goal. 

Russ kicked off to Lewis, who was dropped on the 
10-yard line. Whitaker failed to gain and Cobb 
punted to Schwartz In the middle of the field. Curtis 
failed to gain, as did Savage and Whalen's punt was 
blocked, Massachusetts recovering the ball. Munson 
made three yards, Lewis gained two more and 
then Cobb was again forced to kick, the ball rolling 
over the line and Schwartz falling on it for a touch- 
back. Whalen kicked from the 25-yard line to Whit- 
aker who ran it back 20 yards. Massachusetts fum- 
bled and Webb recovered the bal! By a series of 
end runs and line plunges Brown carried the ball rap- 
Idly down the field for the third touchdown. Webb 
missed the goal. 

The second half was practically a repetition of the 
first. Massachusetts failed to advance the ball and 
Brown still maintained its aggressive work. Massa- 
chusetts' defence was stronger in this period and 
although Brown rarely failed to gain, every foot was 
contested. 



Massachusetts, 0. 
Oct. 8. the team journeyed to Providence and met 
the heavy Brown team at Andrews Field. Although 
defeated, the same gritty play characterized our team 
as in former games. Our team was not in the best 
physical condition owing to the hard schedule it has| Sava K e ' Elmke. f. b. 



BROWN. 

Schwinn, 1. e. 

MacCregor. 1. t. 

Conklin. 1. g. 

Colter, c. 

Fletcher, r. g. 

Webb, r. t. 

Russ. r. e. 

Schwartz, q. b. 

Rachel, Whalen. Werkert, 1. h. b. 

Curtis. Chase, r. h. b. 



f. b. 



MASSACHUSELTS. 

r. e., Tupper 

r. Li Craighead 

r. g.. Ladd, Cutter 

c, Patch 

1. g., Carey 

I. t., Gardner 

1. e.. Martin 

'q. b., Cobb 

p. h. b.. Whitaker 

1. h. b., Lewis 

Munson, Philbrick 



Touchdowns— Webb 2. Savage 2. Chase. Goals from 
[touchdowns— Colter 2. Umpire— Patch of Tufts. Referee— 
Pendleton of Bowdoin. Timer— Wolfe of Princeton. Lines- 
|men — p e t e rs and Keene. Time— 20 and 15 min. periods. 

We wish to extend to the Dartmouth management 
>ur warmest appreciation for the cordial treatment 
/hich our team received at Its recent visit to Han- 
>ver. The many courtesies extended caused the 
[hours spent In Hanover to pass all too rapidly. 

Remember that the Manager has countless things 
[with which to occupy his mind. Help him all you 
can by paying up your taxes and being patient. 

Coach Whalen is evidently having his troubles at 
Tufts. New Hampshire State college recently 
administered a defeat to the •• boys on the hill." 

MAJOR ALVORD DEAD. 

[From the Amherst Record.] 
The many Amherst friends of Major Henry E. 
Alvord were both surprised and shocked to learn of 

i his death, which occured Saturday at a hospital in St. 
Louis, resulting from a stroke of paralysis. He was 

I attending the sessions of the international pure food 
congress and was stricken last Wednesday while In 
the live stock farm at the exposition grounds. Major 
Alvord was son of Daniel W. Alvord and was born In 
Greenfield. March II, 1844. He was graduated at 
Norwich university, Vt., from which he received the 
degrees of B. S., C. E. and LL. D. He enlisted 
during the civil war as a private in the 7th Rhode 
Island cavalry and afterwards joined the 2d regiment 
Mass. Volunteer cavalry, advancing through the diff- 
erent grades to the rank of major. He then entered 
the regular army, and served as a captain from 1866 
to 1872. He was given the first detail at the Mass. 
Agricultural college as Instructor In military science 
and tactics, from 1869 to 1871. While In Massa- 
chusetts. 1873-1880 as teacher In Willlston semin- 
ary, he acted as special Indian commissioner, survey- 
ing the territory and plotting maps for the use of the 
government. He was manager and experimenter at 
Houghton Farm, N. Y. from 1881 to 1885. From 
1 886 to 1 888 he was professor of agriculture at the 
Mass. Agricultural college ; from 1888 to 1892 pres- 
ident of the Maryland Agricultural college : from 1 893 
to 1 894 president of the Oklahoma Agricultural and 



Mechanical college. He organized the dairy division 
of the Department of Agriculture at Washington. D. 
C, In 1895 and served as its chief from that time 
until the day of his death. He received a medal for 
distinguished bravery at the battle of Winchester ; he 
also received medals from the Royal Agricultural 
society of England and the British Dairy Farmers' 
association, for services rendered. He was a mem- 
ber of the International Jury at the Universal Expo- 
sition at Paris In 1900 and a member of the Standing 
committee, for the International Agricultural Congress. 
He was an organizer of cooperative creameries In 
New York and New England, He married, Sept. 6, 
1867, Martha Scott Swlnk. Funeral services were 
held at St. Johns Episcopal church in Greenfield 
Monday afternoon and were largely attended. The 
Agricultural college was represented at the services 
by Prof. F. A. Waugh. There were beautiful floral 
offerings. Rev. Henry R. Wadlelgh. the rector, 
officiated. Following the custom in funerals of those 
who have been soldiers the casket was draped with 
the United States flag. The bearers were Capt. 
George Pierce, Capt. Anson Wlthey, Col. F. E. 
Pierce, Charles Parsons, commander of Edwin E. 
Day post. Charles R. Lowell, and Dwight D. Holden. 
All are members of the post except Col. Pierce and 
Capt. Davis, who is a retired naval officer. The 
Interment was in the family lot In Green River 
cemetery. 



NOTICE. 

At a meeting of the Faculty held Saturday, Oct. 
8, the following rules were adopted : 

1. If a student be dropped into a succeeding class, 
he will not be allowed to take any work with the class 
from which he has been dropped. 

2. If a student who has been dropped into a suc- 
ceeding class, remain in college, he will bs required 
to do the full work of the succeeding class. 

3. These rules shall apply to those students who, 
falling in their examinations at the end of this semes- 
ter, shall be dropped Into a succeeding class, and to all 
who thereafter shall be dropped Into a succeeding 

class. 

C. S. Walker. Secretary. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




THE NATIONAL CONVENTION OF COLLEGE 

EDITORS 

At the convention of college editors held at St. 
Louis from June 20-30, the Signal was the only paper 
in Massachusetts sending a representative ; there 
being, in fact, only one other from New England, and 
he from Maine. There were 108 delegates in all 
present, representing 31 states. 

The convention was planned by, and the work of 
getting the different colleges interested, was accom- 
plished by the sole efforts of W. A. Porter of Wabash 
college, Crawfordsville, Ind. In the early spring, 
after being assured of the presence of enough editors 
to pay for having a convention, he went to St. Louis 
and interviewed the managers of the Fair and of the 
various Pike attractions. As a result of this trip, he 
obtained passes for all the editors to the grounds and 
to the principal concessions on the Pike. 

Therefore, when the editors began to arrive on the 
19th and 20th of June, they were all prepared for a 
good time and started in to have it. Before they 
finished the ten days of the convention, it was the 
unanimous expression of all that they had had a good 
time. The mornings were mostly spent, outside of 
what business was transacted, in visiting the large 
buildings and exhibits, while the time during the after- 
noons and evenings was almost entirely occupied in 
visiting the Pike attractions, all but three being taken 
In. On emerging from a concession it was custom- 
ary to " bunch up " and give a yell for the show the 
proprietor, or anything else that came into their heads, 
and then, in lock-step, to wind in and out among the 
crowd on their way to the next one. 

On the evening of June 22 the editors attended a 
' anquet held in the American hotel, the headquarters 
of the convention. 

In addition to mere pleasure as mentioned above, 
some business was performed. A permanent organ- 
ization, for the purpose of strengthening college litera- 
ture, was effected, with H. M. Pratt of the Daily lowan 
as general secretary. The following bills passed the 
house : Pulitzer's School of Journalism was recom- 
mended, the Fair people were thanked, and a conven- 
tion to be held next year was voted for, said conven- 
tion to be held at such a place as the general secre- 
tary shall see fit to hold it. 



The convention closed with a trip on an excursion 
steamer down the Mississippi river. To a fellow 
attending the convention, one of the things which will 
always remain in his mind, outside of the enjoyment 
always derived from such a trip, is the peculiar pleas- 
ure he experienced in meeting and associating with 
other fellows from all parts of this vast United States 
of America. 

Taken all in ail, one who had the good fortune to 
attend the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, and espec- 
ially at the time of this convention, obtained some- 
thing which can never be taken from him, the good 
of which can as yet scarcely be realized. 

Swain. "05. 



Collet Nott$. 



— The largest freshman class on record ! 

—Robert E. Smith, ex-'05, visited college last 
week. 

— Shintaro Arimoto, of Oharomura. Aidagun, Mima- 
saka, Japan has entered the sophomore class. 

— O. B. Whipple of K. S. A. C. 1904. is now tak- 
ing work under Prof. Waugh for an advanced degree. 

—Clifton H. Chadwick, '07. has received the 
appointment as assistant in the meteorological 
department. 

—Prof. Ralph E. Smith, pathologist at the Cali- 
fornia State Experiment Station spent a few days in 
Amherst recently. 

— Hill, '05, ex-manager of the basketball team, and 
Rice, '07' have entered Dartmouth while Ferren, '06, 
has entered Amherst. 

— Professor Cooley passed a few days in September 
at the St. Louis exposition, where he went to judge 
Ayrshire cattle entered in the stock show. 

— Frank F. Hutchings of the class of '05 is now 
attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
where he is specializing in electrical engineering. 

— Everybody give loyal support to the football 
team ! Think of what it has accomplished ; the hard 
schedule before it and give the players encouragement 

— George F. Freeman, former assistant to Prof. 
Stone, has accepted a position in the Kansas State 
Agricultural College at Manhattan, Kansas, as assist- 
ant in botany. 



— J. C. Richardson, '05, has been unable to return 
to college because of the illness of his father. He 
expects to return, however, as soon as the fall rush of 
work is over. 

— The loss of Hutchings, Farrar, and Rice from the 
Signal board necessitated the election of the follow- 
ing men to fill the vacancies : Williams, '05. Chap- 
man, '06. and Philbrick. *07. 

— The Gamma Delta chapter of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity, established in the college last spring, sent 
P. F. Williams, '05. as a delegate to the national con- 
vention of that fraternity, which was held in St. Louis 
In August, 

— At a meeting of the members of the basketball 
team on Oct. 6. the following men were elected to fill 
the vacancies caused by the resignations of Hill and 
Farrar : Manager, John J. Gardner ; assistant mana- 
ger. Addison T. Hastings. Jr. 

— At a meeting of the class of 1908 the class 
organized as follows : President. James A. Hyslop. 
Rutherford. N. J.; vice-president, James E. Draper, 
Worcester ; secretary and treasurer, C. F. Allen, 
Worcester. The class colors are gray and maroon. 

— At a meeting of the senior class the following 
officers were elected for the coming year: George 
W. Patch, president ; Thomas F. Hunt, vice-presi- 
dent ; P. F. Williams, secretary ; Bertram Tupper, 
treasurer; Allan N. Swain, sergeant-at-arms ; Albert 
D. Taylor, historian. 

— The 1907 Index board consists of Clifton H. 
Chadwick, editor-in-chief; Milford H. Clark, business 
manager ; Fred C. Peters, assistant business mana- 
ger ; W. E. Dickinson, artist ; Henry T. Pierce and 
Clinton King, statistical editors ; Edwin D. Philbrick, 
Arthur W. Higgins. and Earle G. Bartlett. literary 
editors. 

— Prof. Geo. O. Greene was married on Sept. 7, to 
Miss Alice Worley of K, S A. C: ; the marriage tak- 
ing place at Natoma. Kansas in the presence of a few 
relatives and friends. The bride and groom, after 
being entertained by friends in Kansas, came to 
Amherst, making the usual stop at the World's Fair 
for a few days. 

— Prof. Herman Babson, who for the past year has 
been abroad devoting most of his time to a study of 
the German language at Berlin University, is again 



with us as Professor of English and German. Besides 
studying, Professor and Mrs. Babson have travelled 
through most of the European countries, having been 
away over fourteen months. 

— The annual rush of the Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores was held the first night after college opened. 
It was the cleanest and most sportsmanlike rush of 
recent years and '07, though far surpassed In num- 
bers, were with their confidence, grit.and organization 
nearly a match for 08, who were also somewhat 
handicapped by freshman nervousness and lack of 
familiarity with each other. At the close the senate 
gave the decision as a draw. 

— The annual reception of the Y. M. C. A. to the 
members of the Incoming class was held in the Chapel 
Friday evening. Sept. 30, 1904. A large number 
were present and a very pleasant evening was passed 
by all. The usual reception preceded and was fol- 
lowed with a few words of welcome by the president of 
the association. L. S. Walker, after which the 
gathering was addressed by the following speakers: 
Prof. G. F. Mills, Rev. W. E. Strong. F. H. Kennedy 
upon football ; J. F. Lyman to represent the College 
Signal ; Prof. S. F. Howard, college athletics, and 
Prof. F. A. Waugh with witticisms and " general 
advice." The evening's program was concluded after 
the serving of ice cream and cake and the singing of 
the college song. 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Allen, C. F., Worcester. 
Allen, H.C., East Northfleld. 
Anderson, A. J.; North Brookfleld. 
Anderson, K. F.. Rosllndale. 
Bailey, E. W., Worcester. 
Bangs. B. W., Amherst. 
Barry, T. A.. Amherst. 
Bartlett. L. W.. Amherst. 
Bates. C. B., Salem. 
Bennett. E. V.. Maiden. 
Blake, R. R., East Pepperell. 
Blakely, F. C. Medford. 
Browne, M. M.. Maiden. 
Caldwell. J. S.. Lynn. 
Carter. H. R.. Millbury. 
Chapman, L. W., Pepperell. 
Chase, H. C. Swampscott. 
Clark. O. L., Maiden. 
Cobb, G. R., Amherst. 
Coleman. W. J.. Natick. 



CsmA 



\ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 



Cox, L. C.i Boston. 

Cummings. W. A., Belchertown. 

Cutting, R. E.. Amherst. 

Damon, H. F., Belchertown. 

Daniel, J., Osterville. 

Davenport, S. L., North Grafton. 

Davis, P. A., Lowell. 

Dolan, C, Hudson. 

Draper, J. E.. Worcester. 

Eastman, P. M.Townsend. 

Edmands, E. C, Saugus. 

Edwards, F. L.,Somerville. 

Farley. A. J.. Waltham. 

Farrar, P. W., Springfield. 

Flint, C. L. Amesbury. 

Pullman, C. F.. North Brookfield. 

Gillett, C. S.. Southwick. 

Gillett, K. E., Southwick. 

Gold, F. L., Amherst. 

Goodwin, C. L.. Brockton. 

Gowdey, C, C St. Michael. Barbados. 

Grady, J. R., Holliston. 

Hamburger, A. F.. Hyde Park. 

Hayes, H. K., North Granby, Conn. 

Hayward, W. W.. Milbury. 

Howe, W. L., Marlboro. 

Hyslop, J. A. Rutherford, N. J. 

Ingalls, D. F., Cheshire. 

Jackson. R. H., Amherst. 

Jennison, H. M., Mlllbury. 

Johnson. F. A.. Westford. 

Jones, T. H.. Easton. 

Lacouture, C. L.. Mlllbury. 

Larsen, D., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Liang Lai Kwei, Tientsin, China. 

Miller. D. P.. Worcester. 

Moyer, H. M., Derry Church. Pa. 

Negus, P. H., Fall River. 

Pagliery, J. C, 21 1 W 1 Ith St., New York City. 

Parker, J. R., Poquonock, Conn. 

Potter. J. S., Concord. 

Fandall. F. G., Belchertown. 

keed, H. B. Worcester. 

Regan, W. S., Northampton. 

Sawyer, W. F. Sterling. 

Shattuck. L. A. Pepperell. 

Smith. G. F., Barre. 

Thurston. F. E.. Worcester. 

Turner. Miss Olive May, Amherst. 

Turner, W. F.. Reading. 

Verbeck, R. H.. Maiden. 

Warner, T. L., Sunderland. 

Waugh. T. F.. Worcester. 

Wellington, J. W.. Waltham. 

Wheeldon, A. J.. Worcester. 

Wheeler. H. T., Lincoln. 



White, H. L., Maynard. 
Whiting, A. L.. Stoughton. 
Whilmarsh. R. D., Taunton. 
Wright. S J., South Sudbury. 



M. F DICKINSON, ESQ., TRUSTEE. 

[From College and Alumni News 1904.] 
Gov. Bates has appointed M. F. Dickinson, of 
Boston, a member of the board of trustees to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Charles L. Flint. 
He was born in Amherst, and spent his early years at 
the "Dickinson farm," situated directly north of the 
college property. This farm is now occupied by Mr. 
Dickinson as his summer home. As classmate of 
President Goodell he was graduated from Amherst 
college in 1862. 

He has been president of the American Bar Asso- 
ciation, is counsel for the Boston Elevated Railroad 
Co., and his services are in great demand by large 
public interests. For several years he has been presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of Williston seminary. 
He has a natural love of agriculture and all that per- 
tains to it, and has always manifested a deep interest 
in the college. His lectures on rural law delivered in 
his earlier years as a member of the faculty were 
highly esteemed. A brother, the late Asa W. Dick- 
inson, was a graduate in the class of 74. A younger 
brother, Capt. Walter M. Dickinson, who received a 
fatal wound at El Caney, was a member of one of the 
earlier classes, and after graduation at West Point, 
and several years of service in the army, was detailed 
as military instructor at M. A. C, a position which he 
held for four years. 



CLASS OF 1904. 



Ahearn, M. Francis, foreman of greenhouse Kansas 
State Agricultural College, Manhattan, Kansas. 

Back, Ernest A., Amherst. Mass. Graduate student 
Mass. Agricultural college. 

Blake. Maurice A.. Kingston, R. I. Assistant Horti- 
culturist R. I. Experiment Station. 

Couden. Fayette D.. 1310 Columbia Road N. W. 
Washington, D. C. Division Entomology U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture. 

Elwood, Clifford F., Green's Farms Conn. General 
Farming & Fruit growing. Onions a specialty. 

Fulton. Erwin S.. Amherst. Mass. Assistant chemist 
Hatch Experiment Station. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Gilbert. Arthur W.. 402 Oak Ave.. Ithaca. N. Y. 

Graduate student Cornell university, 
i Gregg. John W„ landscape gardner with Department 

of Horticulture L. P. E. St. Louis, Mo. 
[Griffin, Clarence H., Commission Business, Jameson, 

Mo. 
Haskell. Sidney B.. Amherst. Assistant agriculturist 

Hatch Experiment Station. 
Henshaw, Fred F., Templeton. Mass. 
Hubert, Z. Taylor, Professor of Natural Science and 

Agriculture. Florida State Normal and Industrial 

School. 
Newton, Howard D , 42 Lake Ave., New Haven Conn. 

Graduate student Yale university. 
O'Hearn, George E..2I5 East St., Pittsfield, Mass. 
Parker, Sumner R., Amherst. Mass. Assistant Hatch 

Experiment Station. 
Peck, Arthur L.. Hillside Ave.. Bluehills. Mass. Care 

Supt. Dings. Foreman Metropolitan Park 

System. 
Quigley, Raymond A. ,20 BartlettSt.. Brockton, Mass. 

Graduate student Harvard Medical College. 
Raymoth, R. Raymond, Woodstock, 111. Professor 

of Science. Todd Seminary. 
Staples. Parkman F.. Amherst, Mass. Graduate 

student Mass. Agricultural College. 

White. Howard M.. Springfield. Mass. 

^ 

THE AUTOCRAT. 

How glad we are, all of us, to be back ! How 
happy we are to greet our old friends ! How natural 
it seems to take up again the happy life at Old Mas- 
sachusetts, which we were so eager to drop last June ? 
It is true that we miss Nought-four, but have they 
not done what we are all working for? The Autocrat 
can just imagine how fittingly the class of Nought -four 
can use Caesar's words "Venl, vidl, vici." The step 
from junior to senior is a solemn one, and from soph- 
omore to junior a sober one ; but just consider for a 
moment the gait of a freshman just through learning 
a hard and arduous lesson, coming back a full-fledged 
sophomore, with seemingly unlimited privileges. To 
you Nought-seven the Autocrat says, " Make the 
most of it, It is your year of play, so play hard. 
***** 

This year Massachusetts arose from its three 
months slumber to find In its cradle the class of 1908. 
The Autocrat congratulates you, men of 1908, for 
you are entering upon your college course under very 



promising circumstances. You are strong in numbers 
and have a good junior class to help you. But 
remember you are only raw material yet, and the 
success of your class lies in the future. You should 
grow up to be a live constructive class ; and the first 
step in that direction is to learn your lesson from the 
sophomores and upper classmen however disagreeable 
it may be at times. And learn It thoroughly. To 
use Caesar's words again •• Venl, vidi, vlcl," you have 
come, you are beginning to see, but you have yet to 
conquer. Go right in to win. 

***** 

Now the new year seems to offer many good 
things. A good start in our fooibaii season, a large 
entering class with good material to develop, and 
prospects in general better than ever before. Many 
inprovements for Massachusetts seem to be within 
reach the coming year, but we must help ourselves 
before the good Providence will help us. So every- 
body up for our football team. Pay your taxes, go 
to the games, cheer the 'varsity and the scrub and 
lend a hand at every opportunity. 



Dtp&rtmt Mf ftlotfs. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE AND 
LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

The department still has frequent calls for men. 
During the last week one man has been asked for to 
manage a 250-acre orchard In West Virginia and 
another to be professor of horticulture in a western 
college •• at a salary of $1 .400 to $1 .800. " 

The forestry work has already begun under the law 
passed by the last legislature. The new state forester 
has been appointed. Mr. Alfred Akerman. the 
forester, has opened the work in several lines In 
cooperation with Prof. Waugh. A field exercise was 
given the other day to the horticultural section of '05 
with a few other students ; and some steps have been 
taken toward starting a nursery. Mr. Akerman will 
give a course of lectures on forestry during the winter. 

Prof. Waugh's garden of dwarf fruit trees has con- 
tinued to be one of the principal objects of interest 
for visitors during the summer and fall. Several of 
the trees bore this summer, the fruit in all cases 
being remarkably fine. 



t* 



10 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



11 






I 



'• The Graft Union " ts the title of a technical 
bulletin from the pen of Prof. Waugh, now in press 
and soon to be distributed by the Hatch Experiment 
Station. It is illustrated with some specially fine 
engravings from photographs. Prof. Waugh is also 
the author of a paper on" Marketing Apples "sent 
out with a recent crop report of the Massachusetts 
Board of Agriculture. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Richard Hendric Robertson, Massachusetts 

Agricultural College, Class of 1903. 
Realizing the weight of our own affliction in the 
loss of our beloved classmate, we hereby extend our 
deepest sympathy to his bereaved family. 

Surely he who, by simple, earnest living had become 
dear to us was doubly bound by family ties. We can 
but revere his memory in the deep realization that he 
has not lived in vain. 



G. D. Jones, Secretary. 

W. E. Tottingham. President. 



For the class. 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all tbe " Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment .*. .*. 

THAT'S US. 



Haynes & Co., 



Always Reliable. 



Spring field, 



Mam 




Surprise PRIZES given awaj. 



to get the people to talk about bixlers' physical training in penmanship, the 
best method of instruction in the world — Saves 90 per cent, of time, etc. 

Merit Prizes, Surprize Prizes, Prize Prizes, Sure Prizes, Big Prizes, Little 
Prizes, Contingent Prize and other Prizes for little folks and big folks. Send 10c. 
for Business Penman, 12 Writing Mottoes, sample rapid Writing, skilled Bird 
Flourish, and full particulars. (1 Surprise Prize will be included, worth from 
10c. to a dollar, and a $10 Prize Prize goes with each 100th 10c. order — con- 
ditional.) 

Prof. G. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. 



After our summer vacation we returned with pleas- 
ant anticipations of a delightful year as brothers In 
1 .Kappa Sigma, but on our arrival our hearts were sad- 
dened to learn of the death of one of our most faith- 
ful brothers Richard Hendric Robertson. On Sept. 
10. he was called away and left with each one of us 
a feeling of bereavement and a memory of the pleas- 
ant hours we had spent together. 

At the first regular meeting of the college year the 
following resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, It has pleased our Almighty Father in His infinite 
wisdom to take from our midst our beloved brother, Richard 
Hendric Robertson, be It therefore. 

Resolved. That we the active members of Gamma Delta 
chapter of Kappa Sigma hereby express our deepest sorrow 
for our loss and extend our sympathy to his family in their 
bereavement. 

Resolved, That the members of this chapter as a token of 
their bereavement will wear crepe above the inverted badge 
of the Fraternity for a period of thirty days from the date of 
these resolutions. 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be placed in the 
records of this chapter, that a copy be sent to the bereaved 
family, that a copy be sent to the Caduceus. that a copy be 
sent to the College Signal and a copy to the Amherst Record 
for publication. 

E. Thorndike Ladd, 
Bertram Tupper. 
Harold Foss Tompson 



Committee 
for Chapter. 



Alu 



mm. 



'94. — H. Preston Smead is producing fruit and 
dairy products in Greenfield. 

'94, — w. E. Sanderson has accepted a position as 
agent for the J. M. Thorburn Co.. New York, N. Y. 

'94. — Dr. C. F. Walker, who for the past two 
years has been Professor of Sciences in the Mon t- 
clair high school, N. J., has accepted a similar posi- 
tion In the High School of Commerce. New York, N.Y. 

'94. — F. L. Greene has accepted a position to teach 
in San Marcos, Cal. 

•95. — Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Hemenway announce 
the birth of a son, Clyde Herbert, born Sept. 1 1. 

96.— Dr. I. Chester Poole and Dr. Margaret M. 
Poole. Osteopathic physicians, have opened new 
offices at 292 Pine St., Fall River. 

'97. — John A. Emrich has moved to Los Ange- 
les, Cal. 

'98. — Willis S. Fisher has been engaged as prin- 
cipal of the Danvers grammar school. Danvers. 



WRITE US FOR FRM* FA MFHLKT. 

A CURE FOR 

PIMPLES 

With letters from physicians and 
druggists stating results obtained. 

DERM-ASEFT1C 

SKIN LOTION NEVER FAILS 

It Makes Rough Complexions 
Smooth and Soft as Velvet. 

We will upon request mail the pamphlet t<> you in a 
plain envelope, and you will be convinced. 



All Druggists Sell It. 



DERM ASCEPTIC CO., 



OKiaAO-o. 



i j r»-i A o- 1 > A.'nc 



Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 



H\ ^2V. SLOAN, 

Amhkrst, Mass. 



W. M. SEA is, '<x\ 



r. K. Shaw, '07. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT TIIK 



COLLEGE STORE, 



ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 






r 



:: ■■ X 












ta 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•00. — A. C. Monahan's marriage to Miss Mary E. 
Cody of Amherst was celebrated July 1. 

•00.— Dr. Howard Baker, Veterinarian. 1016 N 
22 St. South. Omaha, Neb.. Inspection service of the 
Bureau of Animal Industry. U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

'00.— J. E. Halligan, is head of the sugar experi- 
ment station at the World's Fair. St. Louis. 

'00.— J. W. Kellogg is now first assistant chemist 
at the Rhode Island Experiment Station. 

•01. — A. A. Harmon has accepted an appointment 
to the Pathological Department of the Bureau of 
Animal Husbandry of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

'03. — George H. Lamson has entered as a gradu- 
ate student in Zoology at Yale Universtty. 

'03.— William E. Tottingham has accepted a posi- 
tion as Instructor in Chemistry at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, where he is studying for a Ph.D. 

'03.— Charles P. Halligan Is at present Professor 
of Horticulture at the National Farm School. Pa. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Ha tters and Tailors. 

The largest stock and the lowest prices In town. 

Agents for the celebrated Gayer Hats and A. B. Klrech- 

baum k Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN AMD H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON <ft THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Hmbetst Ibouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



O. H. KBNDmiCK, P*op»faro». 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



STOP AT 



Johnson's 



OL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 26, 1904 



NO. 2 



for something to read on the way. 

BOOKS, PICTURES, STATIONERY. 
313-315 Main Street, - SrRiNOKiBi.D, Mam. 



Published Fortnightly by Students af the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumn' are requested to contribute. Communication, should be addressed. Collioi Siokal. Ahh.mt, Mass. Tm« S.okal will be 
!m. .U rliZr. untTit. d.scontlnuanc. i. ordered snd .near, .re peid. Subscriber, who da no, race*, their peper regularly .re request* «. 
ify the Business Manager. __ 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Editor-In Chief. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. Business Manager. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES, 1 90b. Assistant Business Manager. 
MC «,u*w 5U/AIN lOOS EDWIN HOBART SCOTT. 1906. Intercollegiate. 

tS ^DER^C WILLIAMS. 1905. Department Notes. GEORGE HENRY CHAPMAN, 1906. Alumni Note.. 

LBERT DA?IS T^Y^OR .905. College N*es. ARTHUR W!LLIAM H.GC.NS. 1907. 

RTHUR ALPHOnS RAC COT. J...W EDWIN DAN!ELS PH.LBR.CK. .907. Athletics. 



Belie jjj Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



Term., S1.00 per ijear la .dee nee. Sing" Copt-, 10c PoeU 9 « of ide of United Stef and Canada, lie, extra. 






M. C A. 

•Ball Association, 
pllege Senate. 
adir.g-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

L. S. Walker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

E. W. Newhall. Jr., Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

W. A. Munson. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Six Index. 

H. F.Thompson, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec 

B. Tupper, Manager • 

F. H. Kennedy. Manager. 

G. W. Patch. Pre. 



Entered »a secsnd-claas matter, Peet Office at Amherst. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 



Edrt&ri&ls. 



We hope to see a great many of the alumni at the 
imherst game Saturday. It arouses our enthusiasm 

see the alumni so interested in the college. The 
jam has played a hard, gritty, and fast game 
jroughout the season ; and the graduates cannot fall 

be well pleased with the work of the team. 



s&* 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., • 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



I The Autocrat in this issue makes a timely remark 
on the unsatisfactory nature of the sophomore-fresh- 
man campus rush and suggests some Improvements; 
also on the matter of a field day to promote track 
tthletlcs within the college at least. We believe that 
Ijoth propositions will promote the best interests of 
f/assachusetts and earnestly hope that something will 
be done before long. 

In another column are published the rules govern- 
ing the competition for the election of new men to 
ie Signal board. It is hoped that a large number 



will enter the competition. For competitive articles, 
essays are particularly desired, although work of any 
nature whatever will be considered in the election of 
new men. Competition begins at once, and. other 
things being equal, those who first qualify will be given 
the preference. 



The time for the first Informal dance of the year is 
fast approaching ; and we believe that the men In 
college cannot be too strongly urged to attend these 
social events. These dances constitute a very 
important part of the college life ; and any fellow who 
does not attend them Is simply not living up to his 
opportunities. Ask any old grad. and he will tell you 
that the college hops and proms, are red letter days 
In his life's calendar. There Is no reason why this 
years's informals should not be the most successful of 
any ever carried on. The ladles of the faculty are so 
kind as to help us In every way to make the dances 
enjovable. and we can show our appreciation of their 
kindness in no better way than by our presence at 
every dance. 



o 









M 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The citizens of Arlington Heights have declared 
war against the insect pests, the brown-tail moth and 
the gypsy moth, by the formation of a Tree Protec- 
tion Association, and have begun a vigorous attack 
upon the small despoilers. The creosote can. the 
brush, the ladder, the pruner and the scraper are the 
munitions of war ; and these are being widely dis- 
tributed throughout the town by the Association. 
The question of how to deal with our insect pests is 
one that interests our college quite deeply, as it is a 
problem that many of our graduates are trying to 
solve. There has been too long a tendency to allow 
certain pests peacefully to multiply until it is almost 
impossible to overcome them and bring them under 
control. It would seem that a Tree Protective Asso- 
ciation under wise guidance could do a great work In 
preserving the shade trees of our cities, towns, and 
villages and even the trees of the forests. 



Athletic No*tS- 



FOOTBALL. 

Massachusetts, 24 ; Wesleyan. 6. 

October 1 5, the football team defeated Wesleyan at 
Middletown by the decisive score of 24 to 6, Wes- 
leyan scoring its only touchdown on a fluke. The 
teams were about evenly matched as to weight. Both 
teams were fast, but the defense of the Middletown 
team was vastly inferior to the stubborn work of Mas- 
sachusetts when Wesleyan had the ball. Wesleyan 
found it practically impossible to gain through our line 
and resorted to many tricks. Van Surdam circled the 
end once for a run of fifty yards and Bailey made 
twenty more on a fake kick. Massachusetts had no 
-c ble In advancing the ball, Lewis, Whitaker and 
Munson repeatedly going through the line for five and 
ten yards. 

The game started by Cobb kicking off to Day who 
advanced the ball 15 yards. On the next play Day 
fumbled and the ball went to Massachusetts on Wes- 
leyan's 20 yard line. After three rushes Lewis went 
over for a touchdown and Munson kicked the goal. 
Cobb kicked off to Gildersleeve. A quarterback run 
advanced the ball 25 yards and Dearborn plugged the 
line for four more. Here Massachusetts braced ?nd 
received the ball on downs. By fierce line plunges 



Massachusetts rapidly carried the ball down the field 
and Lewis was again pushed over for the second touch 
down. Wesleyan again elected to receive the ball 
but was froced to punt at once. Again the ball was 
carried to the fifteen yard line and on an attempt to 
kick a goal from placement, the ball was blocked and 
Day picked it up and ran 80 yards for Wesleyan's 
only touchdown. Eyster kicked the goal. Dearborn 
kicked off to Munson, and by a steady attack on th* 
line the ball was carried rapidly toward Wesleyan s 
goal and Whitaker scored another touchdown for Mas- 
sachusetts. Munson kicked an easy goal. Cobb 
kicked off, the ball going to Eyster. On the next play 
Van Surdam went around the end for an eighty yard 
run to Massachusetts three yard line, where he was 
forced out of bounds. After two attempts to gain 
North was sent over the goal line but fumbled, Ladd 
recovering the ball, scoring a touchback. Massachu 
setts kicked out from their 25 yard line and time was 
called with the ball in the centre of the field. 

In the second half Wesleyan kicked off to Cobb, 
who was downed on the 30 yard line and after rushing 
back to the middle of the field Massachusetts lost the 
ball on a fumble. Wesleyan was forced to punt and 
Massachusetts again went down the field for the last 
touchdown. Lewis carrying the ball over the line. Cobb 
kicked the goal. Eyster received the next kick off and 
ran it back 20 yards. Wesleyan was soon forced to 
punt, Cobb running the ball back fifteen yards. Mas 
sachusetts had the ball on Wesleyan's 20 yard line 
when time was called. For Wesleyan Eyster and Van 
Surdam excelled while for Massachusetts Whitaker 
and Lewis never failed to gain when given the ball. 

MASSACHUSETTS. WESLEYAN 

Martin, (Allen) I.e. 
Cardner, 1. t. 
Carey. (Cutter) I. g 
Patch, c. 
Ladd, r. g. 
Craighead, r. t. 
Hipper, r. e. 
Cobb, q, b. 
Whitaker, r. h. b. 
Lewis. 1. h. b. 
Munson, (Philbrick) f. b. 

Score — Massachusetts 24. 
Lewis 3. Whitaker. Day. Goals from touchdowns, Munson J 
Cobb. Eyster. Refree— Perry Hale of Yale. Umpire — Dr 
Collins. Time keeper— Dr. Swan, 
and Peters. Time — 20 minute halves 



r. e. 



>.* 



(Goodman) Vail 

r. t., Dearborn 

r. g.. Ingraham 

c. Long 

(Woodhead) Thompkinf 

I. t.. North 

I. e.. Eyster (Capt.i 

q. b.. Van Surdam 

(Wolf) Gildersleevr 

r. h. b.. Day 

f. b.. Bailey 

Wesleyan 6. Touchdowns- 



Linesmen — Packard 



h, b. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*5 



Massachusetts. 1 1 ; Training School, 0. 

October 23 Massachusetts defeated Springfield 
Training School 11 to on the Training School 
grounds. The teams were quite evenly matched as 
to weight but the attack of Massachusetts was vastly 
superior to that of the Training School. In the kick- 
ing department Springfield was woefully weak, her 
punts averaging less than twenty yards. Both teams 
fumbled considerably. In the first half the bail was in 
Springfield's territory practically all the time. At no 
period of the game did Springfield threaten our goal. 

Training School opened the game, kicking off to 
Craighead. After carrying the ball to Springfield's 
40 yard line Massachusetts lost the ball on a fumble. 
Training School started a vigorous attack, Draper and 
Steigerwald making substantial gains. Massachusetts 
braced and received the ball on downs in the centre 
of the field. Lewis plunged over tackle for five yards 
and Munson made ten more on a tackle plunge. 
Springfield held, forcing Cobb to punt to Williams 
on the ten yard line. After two rushes with little gain 
Steigerwald made the required distance. Massachu- 
setts forced Springfield to give up the ball on downs 
on Springfield's 20 yard line. Line plunges by Lewis 
and Munson carried the ball to the five yard line where 
a fumble lost us five yards. Massachusetts failed to 
make up this loss and Springfield had the ball on her 
own 2 yard line. Springfield failed to gain and Wil- 
liams punted to Whitaker en the 25 yard line. A 
fumble lost us the ball, and again Springfield punted to 
Whitaker, who ran the ball back to the 20 yard line. 
Another fumble gave the ball to Training school and 
time was called with ball on Training School's 25 yard 
line. 

In the second half Cobb kicked off, the ball rolling 
to the goal line. After rushing it five yards Training 
School was forced to punt, Martin receiving the ball 
for Massachusetts on the 20 yard line. Whitaker 
bucked the line for three yards and Lewis made four 
more through tackle. Munson ripped off eight yards 
outside of tackle and Lewis carried the ball to the three 
yard line on a line plunge. Munson carried the ball 
to the line scoring the first touchdown. Munson kicked 
the goal. Score : Massachusetts 6, Springfield 0. 
Cobb again kicked off, Shean running it back 20 
yards. Massachusetts was off side but Shean fumbled 
and Whitaker fell on the ball. On the next play 



Whitaker made a spectacular run around Martin's end 
for a touchdown. Munson failed to kick the goal. 
Again Cobb kicked off and Training School made 
several good gains. Time was called with the ball In 
the center of the field. The line up: 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Martin, 1. e. 
Gardner, 1. t. 
Carey, 1. g. 
Patch (Cutter) c. 
Ladd. r. g. 
Craighead, r. t. 
Tupper, r. e. 
Cobb, q, b. 
Lewis, ' h. b. 
Whitaker, r. h. b. 
Munson. (Philbrick) f. b. 



I. h 



r. e., Martin 

r. t., Draper 

r g.. Briggs 

c, Roy 

I. g.. Seller 

1. t., Burckhalter 

1, e . Lowman 

q. b.. Young 

r. h. b., Pest (Hill) 

b.. Williams (Shean) 

f. b., Steigerwald 



Score — Massachusetts 1 1. Training School 0. Touchdown 
— Munson. Whitaker. Goals from touchdown— Munson. 
Refree — Foster. Umpire Dr. Collins. Linesmen — Mason 
and Peters Time — 25 and 20 minute periods. 



AN AUTUMN TRAMP. 

I took a tramp one October afternoon which I 
remember not Ullv for the beauty of the landscape, 
but for the changes it underwent during the space of 
four or five hours. The road was an ordinary turn- 
pike, running along past homely, pleasant farms, with 
white dwelling houses, comfortable, as well as pictur- 
esque, and old-fashioned, roomy, red-painted barns 
and out-houses. The air was wild, but fresh, the sky 
a clear blue, and a brisk breeze went rustling through 
the yellow-maples, and dropping the leaves lightly on 
the piles of red fruit under the apple trees. There 
was a wonderful sense of cheer In the look of the 
world that afternoon ; her year's work was done and 
she was enjoying her ease, at rest, yet full of hopeful 
life. By and by I turned off the highroad at a right 
angle, left the upland country behind and walked 
down over a crosstrack toward the river where the 
light only dimly filtered through the close shade. 
For nearly a mile the road continued to plunge down 
through a piece of greenish woodland, full of the scent 
of moist mosses and ferns, and other thick-growing 
greenery. Then it emerges from this cool, dusk 
region and pass.es by an old farm house.probably the 
home of some old pioneer of forty-nine. 

Once fairly out of the woods you find yourself down 
on the river level, with nothing to Intercept the view. 



r 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»7 










Some five or six miles ahead, the stream suddenly 
expands into a broad bay. so closed In by a bend in 
the river's course and by hills at the south as to have 
the appearance of a lake. Rivers and hills seem to 
retreat to indefinite distances In a pearly haze ; the 
hills lay sleeping miles away, while below the river 
seems like a vague, far-off. unknown sea. It was all 
one of nature's pleasant wiles ; she has a wonderful 
way of managing her materials to produce effects. 
But I am wandering. 

I rested here viewing this beautiful scenery and 
lazily pulling at my class pipe for nearly an hour, and 
then suddenly rousing myself I once more tramped 
along as If my only object was to kill time. After a 
short walk a small mountain loomed up before me, 
Climbing up this hill I came upon a little woodland 
dell. It lay between two ridges, wide and shallow, 
with the sharply defined walk, on one side a steep 
wooded ascent, and on the other a perpendicular ledge 
of rock covered with mosses and waving ferns. It was 
a place where shade and silence held sway. The trees 
were old and apart, and there was no underbrush; the 
ground showed mossy bowls where one would naturally 
look for water, but Invaln.for no water with Its bubbling 
murmur disturb ;d the silence. The ravine itself, in 
its transparent freshness and coolness was like a hidden 
forest pool. The only living things seen there were 
the shy. olive-backed thrushes who appear for an 
Instant, and then fly noiselessly away. From the 
greenness and cloistered loneliness of the little dell we 
can see an open summit of rock and a large white 
boulder perched upon the highest point. The sun 
shone brilliantly on the bare rocks, and hawks circling 
in the air. strengthen the impression of loneliness. 
On the one side the outlook was over undulations of 
.oiests, on the other was the view of the river and Its 
little bay. I passed through the dell and just before 
reaching the top of the hill I rested I had lost my 
path and wondered where I was, thinking of my return. 
There was not a path to be seen anywhere. Except 
for the little river, tangles of fine and large forests lay 
on every side. Everywhere silence reigned supreme. 
Did I say silence ? Ah ! I had forgotten the 
progress of civilization, the toot-toot of an electric on 
the other side of the hill floated across to my ears. I 
laughed at the wlerd sound, boarded the car and rode 
home. H., 06 



A NOVEL. 

Vol. I. 
Moonlight evening— shady grove- 
Two young people much in love, 
Heroine with great wealth endowed. 
Hero handsome, poor and proud ; 
Truth eternal — hearts united — 
Vows of changeless passion plighted 
Kisses— quarrels — sighs — caresses. 
Maiden yields one of her tresses, 
Obstacles to be surmounted ; 
Ch ; ef umong them all recounted. 
Ugly riyal old and stale, 
Overhears the tender tale. 

Vol. II. 

Morning in the east looks ruddy 

Scene — young lady's father's study 

Hero with his hat in hand. 

Comes the daughter to demand ; 

Angry parent storms, abuses. 

And at once her hand refuses. 

Maiden faints beneath the blow- 
Mother intercedes — 'tis no. 

Shrieks — hysteria — protestations. 

Mixed with old man's execrations. 

Exit lover midst the din — 

Ugly rival enters in. 

Vol. 111. 
Time — a moonlight night once more, 
Scene — outside the lady's door : 
Lover with half-broken heart, 
Swears he'd rather die than part. 
Garden — flowers — umbrageous shade — 
Many accents — serenade — 
Chamber window open wide — 
Debut of expectant bride ; 
Little dog most kindly mute 
Tears — rope ladder — flight — pursuit. 
Gallant steeds — too late— night screens 
Triumph — marriage — Gretna Green. 
Old man's rage — disowns forever- 
Ugiy rivai — scarlet fever. 

Vol. IV. 
Old man sickly sends for child : 
All forgiveness — reconciled ; 
Young man making money fast, 
Old man's blessing — dies at last. 
Youthful couple live probate — 
Get the money — live in state- 
Mother's wishes crowned with joy. 
Doctors — nurses — little boy. 
Time proceeds — her ties endear — 
Olive branches year by year. 
Blessings on the good attend— 
General gladness — moral, end. 

A. J. 



L.. '07. 



College N<>*«- 



-Remember the Amherst game comes on 
Saturday ! 

-Raitt, ex '07. is now a student at the University 
\i Michigan. 

-Miss Justine Hunt. ' 04, two years course, is 
risiting at college 

-A tennis court is being built near Draper Hall 
>r the use of the ladies of the college. 

-Manager Gardner has the basket ball schedule 
te\\ started and we expect soon to publish a full 
Schedule. 

-The college was represented at the Wesleyan 
ind Springfield Training school games by large 
leLgations. 

— Blakely, ' 08, has left college because he felt a 
ick of preparation ; he expects to return with next 
rear's class. 

— The committee on informal dances consists of 
D. Taylor, chairman ; A. N. Swain ; L. S. Walker 
id H. D. Crosby. 

— G. N. Willis, " 05, represented the Alpha chap- 
sr of the ♦ 2 K fraternity at the biennial convention 
leld in Philadelphia last week 

— The Sophomore- Freshman rope-pull held on 
>ct. 15 was a decided victory for the sophomores 
mo won by four feet, eight inches. 

— C. S. Howe, ' 78. president of Case School of 
Applied Sciences and J. F. Barrett, ' 75. were look- 
over the old landmarks around college last week. 

— At a recent football practice of the freshman 
lotball team Caldwell suffered severe Injuries to his 
Collarbone. He has now gone to his home In Lynn. 
•Aut will return as soon as possible. 

I — At a meeting of the tennis club it was voted to 
lay out a court in the drill hall. The new court is 
being constructed by Sleeper and Lincoln, and should 
^d a new interest to the game here. 

— Maj. Anderson has received copies of the new 
ill regulations which embody many changes from 
old books. It will require some little time to 
icome familiar with the new commands. 



— A game has been arranged with Plttsfleld athle- 
tic association for Saturday, Nov. 12, at Plttsfleld. 
G. E. O'hearn. the captain of last year's team, Is 
coaching for them and a hard game Is expected. 

— On Friday. Oct. 14. a number of the seniors 
from the horticulture and landscape gardening div- 
isions, with Prof. Waugh. went upon a visit to the 
parks of Hartford and the extensive greenhouse 
system of Pierson at Cromwell. At the end of a 
delightful ride through the valley to Hartford on the 
electrics the party was met at the depot and escorted 
to Heublein's hotel where Superintendent Parker of 
Keney park tendered a most Inviting menu. In the 
afternoon accompanied by Mr. West. '03. chief 
designer and engineer at the park, and Mr. Vaughan, 
the park forester, they went upon an extensive drive 
through the Hartford park systems and also visited 
one or two private estates. After reviewing the 
political parade and attending the theatre the party 
remained at the New Dom hotel over night. 
Bright and early, accompanied by Mr. West, Mr. 
Vaughan and Mr. Huss, head gardener of one of 
Hartford's most noted private estates, everybody set 
out for Cromwell, there to be met and entertained by 
Mr. Pierson, '01, who made them very familiar, in the 
time allotted, with one of the greatest greenhouse 
systems of its kind. The trip was concluded with 
witnessing the overwhelming defeat of Wesleyan at 
Mlddletown, Saturday afternoon. Much credit Is 
due to Prof. Waugh and especially to our Hartford 
friends together with Mr. Pierson for the success of 
the trip, and we certainly appreciate to the greatest 
degree the efforts of Sup't Parker, Mr. West and 
Mr. Pierson to make It enjoyable and Instructive. 

PROFESSOR BABSON'S YEAR ABROAD. 

After a year's absence from college duties Profes- 
sor Babson returned last month to continue his work. 
In addition to his courses In American Literature and 
Rhetoric and Oratory, Mr. Babson has charge of the 
Instruction in German. It *as with reference to this 
latter work that he made Germany his headquarters 
during the fifteen months he was away. The summer 
of 1903 was given up to a comprehensive tour of Italy 
and Switzerland. In September of last year Mr. 
Babson went to Berlin where, with the exception of 
two weeks In May of this year, he remained until the 



I; 



o 










18 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



first of July. During this time careful and compre- 
hensive work was done both in the University of that 
city and under the guidance of private instructors. 
In the University work was done under Prof. Eric 
Schmidt In the study of Goethe and Schiller, and 
under Prof. Alois Brandl. the great German Shakes- 
pearian authority, in the study of England's renowned 
dramatist. A course involving a broad study of com- 
prehensive German life and conditions was also com- 
pleted under Dr. Wilhelm Paszkowskl. Upon the 
invitation of Professor Brandl, Mr. Babson conducted 
throughout the first semester of the University year 
an English seminar. Meanwhile constant work 
through private instruction was engaged in along the 
line of practice in pronunciation, composition and 
talking. In May, 1904. Professor Babson visited 
some of the chief Austrian cities, going as far east as 
Buda Pest. This past summer was given up to a 
visit to Denmark, Norway, and Sweden ; and. after a 
few weeks' final sojourn in Germany at Jena and 
Diisseldorf, to a tour of Holland and Belgium. Pro- 
fessor Babson was accompanied during his fifteen 
months of travel and study by Mrs. Babson. 



THE AUTOCRAT 



We all seem to be enjoying the Indian Summer 
weather that is with us just at this time of the year. 
But our good nature is stimulated by other things 
than the weather. We have watched with a great 
deal of interest the work of our football team. We 
have never seen a harder working team, and consider- 
ing the difficult schedule Massachusetts has to play out 
this year, and our success so far. it is safe to say that 
it is probably the strongest team that ever represented 
Massachusetts. Now. we play Amherst on Pratt Field, 
Saturday. Every undergraduate or graduate who can 
possibly be there must be at the game. Good college 
spirit helps to win a game, and let all the Massachusetts 
spirit available be on Pratt field and back up our boys. 
* • * • • 

The customary campus rush between the sopho- 
more and freshman classes on the first night of the 
college year resulted unsatisfactorily to every one 
concerned. It has been the same for a number of 
years back. The trouble evidently Is the lack of 
some element, some trophy or other device that will 



give the victory unquestionably to one side or the 
other. Other colleges have cane-rushes or flag- 
rushes either of which work out to a decisive victory 
to one class. Something of this sort has been con- 
sidered among members of the upper classes and the 
Senate will act on the matter in the near future. The 
Autocrat sincerely hopes that a definite improvement 
will result in that line. Surely there is everything to 
gain in healthy, manly contests between classes. 



Just at this point it seems a good opportunity to 
start up an interest which the Autocrat has had in 
mind for a long time. The college has dropped track 
athletics for a number of years back. Now, every 
loyal Massachusetts man hopes to see a good track 
team here some time. Something can be done now, 
which will greatly help along anything that the college 
attempts in that line In the future. We are of the 
belief that good lively rivalry between classes is ben- 
eficial in every way and especially between the soph- 
omores and the freshmen. Why should we wait any 
longer to have a field day in spring, when the entire 
college will gather to see freshmen pitted against soph- 
omores in putting the shot, mile run, high jump, 
broad jump, relay race, etc.? Some say we have no 
athletic field. But we used to have a track team 
and they got along as best they could. They got 
along with what they had, and we can do the same 
if we only try. This matter Is timely. We ought to 
consider it now and next spring we should witness a 
good field day between 1907 and 1908. 



The Autocrat was named as critic for the evening 
at the Y. M. C. A. reception a little less than a month 
ago. For lack of space he had to postpone his 
remarks to this issue of the Signal. Everything 
seemed to run off nicely. 

But where were the members of the Faculty ? They 
were not as many as the Autocrat has fingers. He 
is aware that Sam T. Jack held a Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ing in the town hall that same evening, but he was 
not there to see if the faculty was there, and further 
more he believes that its members have got over that 
now. 

But where were they? 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*9 



A. C. AND THE COTTON BOLL WEEVIL. 

[Published In College and Alumni Notes. I 

In 1893. the cotton boll weevil, a little insect of 
sxican origin, the control of which was destined to 
:ome the greatest of all problems of economic 
bmology. made its first appearance on the Texas 
|e of the Rio Grande. Spreading rapidly, through 
means or another, it is now found in nearly every 
tton growing section of Texas, and already causes 
annual loss to the cotton planters of the state which 
:onservative 'estimate places at some fifteen mil- 
Ins of dollars. Inside of fifteen years it will prob- 
lly be found in every cotton producing state, and if 
help were at hand the loss occasioned by this one 
sect pest would amount to two or three hundred 
llllions of dollars per annum. 

| Fortunately, through the investigations of the Divis- 

of Entomology of the U. S. Department of Agri- 

klture, a new system of cotton culture has been 

^rked out, by which the Injury is in a large measure 

jided. and as large, if not a larger, yield of cotton 

be obtained from a given acreage than before the 

ll weevil's advent. 

KDut of twelve entomologists of the U. S. Depart - 

jnt of Agriculture in Texas investigating this insect 

ring the present year, seven, (if appointments 

Jered to four are accepted) are M. A. C. men — stu- 

|nts and former students of Prof. C. H. and Dr. H. 

Fernald, 
|W. E. Hinds, M. A. C. '99, has since receiving 
degree of Ph. D. from the college in June. 1902, 
sn employed in Texas on this work by the Division 
J Entomology. He has charge of the laboratory at 
Victoria, and the results of the first two seasons' work 
have already been published in Bulletin No. 45 of the 
Division. The control of insect pests in general is 
primarily dependent upon a knowledge of their life 
^tory. and this is no exception to the rule. In spite 
the fact that so much work has already been done 
jn the same line, the life history work is being con- 
kued this year on a larger scale than was possible in 
svious years. 

IC. M. Walker. M. A. C., '99, formerly first assist- 

|t to Dr. E. P. Felt (M. A. C.. '91). N. Y. State 

iJtomologist, has since April 1 of the present year 

[en in the employ of the Division of Entomology, 

JS. Department of Agriculture, and is assisting in the 

laboratory work on the boll weevil at Victoria, Texas. 



A. W. Morrill. M. A. C. '00. Ph. D.. '03, Is begin- 
ning his second year's work in the Division of Ento- 
mology. His work for the first season was mostly 
field work in connection with the boll weevil Investi- 
gations, including such lines as determining the limits 
of the infested territory. During the present season 
he is in charge of matters relating to quarantines for 
the purpose of delaying the spread of the pest main- 
tained by the various cotton producing states against 
Texas. In connection with his work he has traveled 
extensively throughout Texas, Louisiana. Indian Ter- 
ritory and Mexico. 

Hooker "99, Hodgkiss 02. Franklin '03 and Back 
'04, have been offered appointments in the Division 
of Eniomofogy to work in Texas for a few months on 
the boll weevil investigations, but these men expect 
to return to the College in the fall to continue their 
couse for advanced degrees. 



MODERN JOURNALISM. 

The last few decades have been marked by vast 
changes along many different lines, and former condi- 
tions are constantly giving place to new ideas in all 
branches of life. This seems to be especially true of 
journalism. Indeed, it would seem that what was 
formerly journalism has to a certain extent disap- 
peared, and that its place has been taken by a new 
element which may, for lack of a better term, be 
called newspaperism. It is not difficult to find plenty 
of evidence to substantiate this statement. 

In the early seventies, all of our newspapers were in 
the hands of men who were not only publishers but 
editors. These men owned a controlling Interest In 
their paper and they used this as a means of extend- 
ing their own views on matters, political and otherwise, 
to readers throughout the country. They were men 
who possessed ability to preside over the editorial 
column as well as the manager's desk, and the whole 
newspaper was more or less closely a direct reflection 
of their own personal selves. This type of journalism 
produced not only extensive but brilliant and effective 
editorials on all matters of public Interest and It must 
be admitted that their influence was felt In the trend 
of public events. 

But at present all of this is changed, the modern 
newspaper has passed out of the control of this type of 
publishers and the men who now produce It are rather 



4 * 



30 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



31 











business men than editors. They own and operate 
their papers simply as a business proposition and not 
as a mouthpiece by which they may express their 
views on public affairs. It is true that many of the 
older types of the newspaper still exist but they are 
gradually disappearing in favor of a paper which shall 
give the people what they most desire, not an edito- 
rial feast or a brilliant essay on national politics, but 
instead, an account of what is actually occurring 
throughout the world. In short, the modern journal 
has sacrificed everything for what we call " news " 
and the editorial page has been crowded down to a 
few columns of comments on world events. 

Some have decried this state of affairs and called 
it the decline of journalism, but it can hardly be con- 
sidered such. The man sitting in his editorial chair 
and placing his private opinions before the world at 
large has given place to those whose duty it is to 
Inform people of the world's progress in all its various 
lines of development. It has thus taken up a broader 
and more extensive scale of operation. It has 
become the educator of all classes of society and has 
entered a sphere of usefulness whose limits are almost 
boundless. Thus has journalism steadily advanced 
along with all other Institutions of modern civilization 
and we may rightly expect a yet greater career for it 
during this— the twentieth century. K.. "07. 

RULES GOVERNING COMPETITION FOR THE 
SIGNAL EOARD. 

Competition for position on this board shall be op.*n 
to all students of this college, and contributions are 
solicited at all times. All such contributions shall be 
considered in the election of new men. In addition to 
this competition recommendations from the English 
department shall, whenever the board shall deem 
advisable, be submitted not latter than March 1st. 
The list of those thus recommended together with 
those who have previously contributed shall be published 
in the following issue of the College Signal. The 
men whose names are thus published may then 
become eligible by submitting at least one additional 
article before the closing of the competition, March 
21st. The election of new men will then be made, 
on the basis of merit and ability from the list of those 
who thus become eligible, all cases of doubt the 
preference shall be given to those who contribute prior 
to March 1st 



MOISSAN'S ARTIFICIAL DIAMONDS. 

Five centuries ago it was the dream of the alchem 
1st to produce gold from the base metals. To th: 
twentieth century was reserved a scheme seemingly 
no less visionary, to fashion a sparkling diamond, s' 
rival of Nature's own. The alchemist fail ed. Th«j 
well-known chemist Molssan has shown conclusive!;, 
that the artificial diamond is a fact. 

For a long time it was known that the dlamonc 
was only pure carbon in crystalline form.- Workin 
upon this as a basis we can readily conceive wha 
must have been the line of thought followed by Mois- 
san. To crystallize a substance, three means may fc 
employed ; first, to change the substance to the forrr. 
of a gas and allow It to solidify as sulphur does, fc 
instance ; second, to obtain the substa nee as a 
liquid and allow it to solidify ; third, to allow the sub 
stance to crystallize from solution. 

The first two methods were at once eliminated sines 
carbon, as yet. had not been obtained as either gas c 
liquid. The last method was, however, practicable fc 
carbon dissolves readily in certain molten metals 
But when the carbon crystallized from solution 
formed, not diamond, but crystalline graphite. Th 
specific gravity of graphite is about 2, of the dlamor, 
3.5. How Is a greater density to be obtained? Th 
natural answer is by applying pressure. 

This is exactly what Moissan did. He placed pur 
carbon and pure iron in a carbon crucible In the ele: 
trie furnace. The iron melted and dissolved some : 
the carbon. Then the crucible was removed an 
placed in cold water till the contents were reduce: 
to less than red heat. The outside of the iron solid 
ified while the inside was still molten. So when the 
interior cooled. It tended to expand, but was 
Imprisoned by the solid, outside shell. As a resu 
the carbon crystallized under great pressure. 

When the iron was removed by means of acids 
crystals of numerous shapes were found ; but the 
were all fragments; not an entire diamond was founc 
It is probable that the diamonds exploded wher 
released from the enormous pressure. Moissan ha; 
performed the experiment about three hundred time; 
and has never failed, yet he has expended sever* 
thousand francs not including his time, and has 
obtained only one tenth grains of diamonds. Fo' 
this reason the artificial diamond has not yet createc 
a panic In the diamond market. 



W. '08 



HONOR MEN FOR JUNE, 1904. 

[Through an oversight this list was not published in the last 
sue of the Signal.] 

Grinnell Agricultural prizes, first of $25 Arthur W. 
lilbert, '04. West Brookfleld ; second of $ 1 5. to Sidney 
Haskell, '04, of Southbridge. The Hills prizes, of 
|l5 for the best herbarium, and of $15 for the best col- 
ictlon of Massachusetts trees and shrubs, Ernest A. 
|ack, '04, of Florence, The Flint prizes for excellence 
English oratory, both composition and delivery being 
jnsidered: First prize of $30 to George H. Allen, '05, 
amerville ; second prize of $20 to Albert D. Taylor, 
)5, Westford. Burham prizes for excellence in Eng- 
lish composition : First prize of $20 to Arthur A. 
iaclcot, Jr., "06, of Lowell ; second prize of $10 to 
tdwin H. Scott, '06. Somervllle ; third prize of $5. 
frank A. Ferren, *06, Peabody. For excellence In 
sclamation : First prize of $25 to Charles A. A. 
lice. '07. of Springfield ; second prize of $20 to 
^eorge W. Searle, '07, of Westfield. 

Dtp&rtmfrvt* (Sloths. 

HORTICULTURE AND LANDSCAPE 
GARDENING. 
The bulletin on •• The Farm Wood-lot." published 
by the Department of Horticulture last spring, has 
been very widely noticed, and has been copied bodily 
In several papers. The Young Idea, a nature study 
pagazine of Boston, is the latest one to grace its 
lumns with some of the text and pictures of this 
lletln. 

The department has been making a thorough scien- 
ic study of fruit judging which has attracted con- 
ride rable public attention. The first publication was 
made in Professor Waugh's book on '• Systematic 
Pomology." Since that time Professor Waugh has 
been acting as chairman of a committee for the 
American Ponological society to prepare a system of 
ICore cards for that organization. Professor Waugh 
has also judged the fruit this fall in the great fruit 
iow at the New York state fair ; and expects to 
ge the fruit at the Canadian show next month in 
ironto. He was appointed one of the judges of fruit 
St. Louis, but has not found it convenient to go out 
re for the work. 



my 

: 



A new thing at the greenhouses this year is the 
crop of violets. This is the first time, for several 
years, at least, that a crop of violets has been grown 
Up to date the plants have doing splendidly, and are 
now yielding good crops of blossoms which sell 
promptly at good prices. 

The large number of students taking horticulture, 
floriculture and landscape gardening tax the present 
facilities of the department to the limit. The point 
has been reached where Prof. Waugh has had to 
give up the little office which he has been occupying 
in the Plant house, and these narrow quarters have 
been made into a class room. There are seats for 
only twelve students, but the smaller classes can be 
accommodated and several conflicts of recitations 
thereby avoided. Meanwhile the need of a new 
horticultural building cries louder and louder 

Gardening, the Illustrated horticultural paper pub- 
lished in Chicago, would hardly be worth reading 
any more without the regular contributions of Mr. 
Francis Canning. These cover a variety of subjects, 
mostly in the line of amateur gardening.and are usually 
illustrated with photographs. 

BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Dr. Stone and Dr. Goessmann received appoint- 
ments last summer to read papers before the Interna- 
tional Congress of Scientific men at St. Louis, 
which was held in September. Only five men from 
each branch of science received these appointments, 
which speaks volumes for our two representatives. 
Dr. Stone's paper was to be on Vegetable Pathology 
and Dr. Goessmann's on Agricultural Chemistry. 
Both men were unable to be present. Dr. Stone 
spent two weeks at St. Louis the first of the summer 
setting up and arranging the government biological 
exhibit at the fair. 

Prof. C. S. Plumb, '82. of the Ohio State Univer- 
sity presented the Botanical Department with a large 
number of mounted specimens of plants recently, 
which he collected while a student here. It Is an 
extensive, accurate and creditable work for a student 
collection. 

Dr. E. W. Allen, editor of the Experiment Station 
Record visited the college during the summer and 
inspected the various departments 

Mr. Osmun, '03, is working at present on soli 
bacteriology at the station. He spent the summer 
making Investigations here on the same line of work. 

Mr. Monahan. '03. Is performing an Interesting 
experiment at the station on the influence of electricity 
on vegetation. 



23 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



33 












Dr. Stone published two leaflets the past summer 
for the State Board of Agriculture. One was on Mas- 
sachusetts weeds, the other on Potato Rots. Mush- 
room Growing is the title of a bulletin recently written 
by the same author. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

College Shakespearean club, in memory of oui Fraternal 
Brother Edward Cook Perkins, who was taken frsm our 
midst June 19, 1904. 

Whereas- It has pleased God in his infinite wisdom to 
remove from our midst, our brother Edward Cook Perkins. 

and 

Wheteas. We do keenly feel the loss of him who was a 
student with us at our college, be it 

Resolved. That we. the College Shakespearean club, desire 
to express our sincere and heartfelt sympathy to his family 
in this their day of sorrow. And be it further, 

Resowed. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 

bereaved family, a copy to the editors of the College Signal 

to be published in the next issue, and that a copy be placed 

in the records of the College Shakespearean club 

John F. Gardner, ) 

Harry M. Russell. 

Milford Henry Clark 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the »• Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment . •. 

THAT'S US. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 




Surprise PRIZES given away. 

to get the people to talk about bixlkrs' physical training in penmanship, the 
beet method of instruction in the world— Saves 90 per cent, of time, etc. 

Merit Prizes, Surprize Prizes, Prize Prizes, Sure Prizes, Big Prizes, Little 
Prizes, Contingent Prize and other Prizes for little folks and big folks. Send 10c. 
for Business Penman, 12 Writing Mottoes, sample rapid Writing nkilled Bird 
Flourish, iind full particulars. (1 Surprise Prize will be included, worth from 
10c. to a dollar, and a $10 Prize Prize goes with each 100th 10c. order— con- 
ditional ) 

Prof. G. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. 



Alumni. 



—Francis E. Kimball. 8 John St., Worcester, 
expert accountant. 
75.— John A. Barri, dealer in grain and coal in 
Igeport, Conn., has moved to Cresent Hill Ave . 
|ngfield, Mass. 

76.— George A. Parker. P. O. box 397, Hartford, 
l., superintendent of Keney park. 

|78. Arthur A. Brigham. Ph. D.. professor in 

jmbia School of Poultry Culture. Waterville, N. 

Home address. Lakeside Ave.. Marlboro, Mass. 

[83.— Chas. W. Minott. farmer, Westminster, 

5S. 

I 85— Geo. H. Barber, M. D., surgeon in U. S. 
/al Training school, Newport, R. I. 
[87.— Edward R. Flint. Ph. D., professor of 
jmistry In Florida Agricultural and Mechanical 
»ge, Lake City, Fla- 

1 89. — James T. Hutchings is at present superin- 
iJent of the Rochester street Railroad Electric 
derating Plant, Rochester, N. Y, 
[90. — Dwight W, Dickenson, D. D. S., dentist, 
Hndia Ave.. East Watertown, Mass. 
|91. — Frank L, Arnold is superintendent of the 
bhuric acid department of the Merrlmac Chemical 
[. Woburn. Mass. 

[ 92 — Jewell B. Knight professor of Agriculture at 
pna college. Poona. India. 

[92. — Frank H. Plumb, farmer, Ellithorpe Farm, 
fiord. Conn. 
[94. — pirley E. Davis, retired, Granby, Mass. 

H. — Claude F. Walker, Ph. D., is to deliver a 
se of lectures in New York city on " The Chem- 
of Common Things. '* by request of the Board 
of Education. 

•94. — Fredric L. Greene, teacher of English and 
History, Escondido high school, Escondido, Cal. 

1 96. — Harry T. Edwards, expert in charge of fibre 
Investigations, Philliplne Bureau of Agriculture, 
Manilla, P. I. 

■98. — Married at Somerville on Oct. 19 Samuel 
William Wiley and Miss Florence Isabelle Spofford. 
■03. — C. S. Tinkham. home address., 126 Thorn- 
Ist., Roxbury, Mass. 



WRITE US FOR FREE PAMPHLET. 

A CURE FOR 

PIMPLES 

With letters from physicians and 
druggists stating results obtained. 

DERM-ASEFT1C 

SKIN LOTION NEVER FAILS 

It Makes Rough Complexions 
Smooth and Soft as Velvet. 

We will upon request mail the pamphlet to you in a 
plain envelope, and you will be convinced. 

All Druggists Sell It. 



DERM ASCEPTIC CO., 



CHICAO-O. 



UP'TO'DATB 

Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 
Amherst, Mass. 



W. M. SlAfta, '06. 



r. it. .Shaw, '07. 



A Full Line of 



Students' Supplies 



AT TIH 



COLLEGE STORE, 



ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 













24 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•Q3. Lester F. Harvey, farmer. Romford. Litch- 
field county. Conn. 

•03.— Myron H. -Vest, landscape architect and 
engineer ; office, 12 Blue Hills Ave,, Hartford, Conn,, 
engineer at Keney Park. 

• 03.— Stephen C, Bacon is at present draughtsman 
in the Brookline Gas Light Co., address, 432 Colum- 
bia Ave., Boston, Mass. 

• 03.— Wm. L. Hood has accepted a position as 
professor of Agriculture and Military Science in the 
Sango Baptist college and Industrial Institute, Musko- 
gee. Indian Territory. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

In one of the editions of the Tech we noticed an 
article containing this resolution, namely : " that no 
freshman or upper classman while around college, 
should be allowed to wear sweaters or jerseys bear- 
ing numerals, letters or other Insignia of the prepar- 
atory school from which he came, unless such sweat- 
ers be worn inside out with insignia on the back." 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters uid Tailors. 

The largest titoek and the lowest prices iu town. 

AgentB for the celebrated Ouyer Hats and A. B. Kirsch- 

baum & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN amd II. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON <£ THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Hmberst Ibouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Pmormimro* 



On Tout Wag Home 



STOP AT 



Johnson's 

for something to read on the way 
BOOKS, PICTURES, STATIONERY, 

313-315 Main Street, 






Spmnqfield. Mass 



WHAT ARE THEY? 

The best Confections made. 

HENRY ADAMS & G0. ; 

SOLE AGENTS FOB AMHERST. 




PHOTOGRAPHER. 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MAS* 





the college: signal 



XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 9, 1904 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students .f th. Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

^tify the Buaineaa M anager. — , _ — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Edltor-ln Chief. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905, Business Manager, 

B*i pm WARE PEAKE3 1906, Assistant Business Manager. 

RALPH WARE IWiW, ^^ H0BART SC0TT l906 , mtercollegiate. 

U.LEN NEWMAN SWAIN. 1905. GEORGE HENRY CHAPMAN. 1906. Alumni Notes. 

PERCY FREDERIC WILLIAMS. 1905, Department Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS. 1907. 

kLBERT DAVIS TAYLOR. 1905. College Notea. EDWIN DANIELS PH1LBRICK, 1907, Athletics. 
kRTHUR ALPHONSE RACICOT, J*.. 1906. 



^STi^iS^^^ r-^*--^!!!!^^ 



W. M. C. A. 

foot- Ball Association, 

pollege Senate, 

eadlr.g-Room Association, 




SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. S. Walker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

E W Newhall. Jr., Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

W. A. Munson. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Sli Index. 

H. F. Thompson. Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manage,. 

F. H. Kennedy. Manager. 

G. W. Patch. Pres. 



Entered as secand-class matter, Paet Office at Amherst. 



Edi"tb rials. 



^s the matter of speaking to the Freshmen on the 
subjtct of becoming pledged to a fraternity was neg- 
lected at the beginning of the college year, it seems 
fcnly right to mention It now. At a meeting of the 
fraternity conference some few years ago. a plan was 
Idopted by which no freshman could be pledged to a 
paternity before the day that college opened after the 
Christmas vacation. 



It would seem that the public press particularly 
lellghts In getting a knock at our college. Not long 
llnce an article appeared severely critising our exhibit 
it St. Louis, and the reader was led to believe that 
Ihe entire display was composed of worthless junk. 

lowever. the college has since been notified that 
Massachusetts has been awarded the grand prize for 
producing an exhibit which best typifies the class of 
Institution which It represents and the work done by 

hem. The principal of a scientific Institution In New 



York, who saw the exhibit at St. Louis, has written 
requesting that it be donated to his school ; but there 
are certain parts in the collection which will be so 
useful for class room demonstration that President 
Goodell declines to give it up. We know that it 
required a great deal of planning, of money, and of 
labor to prepare the exhibit and so we really think 
that our critic has taken as unwarrantable a stand as 
the western paper that attacked the college so severely 
last summer, calling our professors all " fossils M say- 
ing that none of our graduates worked along agricul- 
tural lines, and finally holding up as a model for us to 
copy Minnesota Agricultural College. The article 
was widely copied In the eastern papers, and produced 
no little sensation until facts and figures were brought 
forward which proved the utter baselessness and 
absurdity of the attack The most crushing blow to 
the whole article was dealt when it was made known 
that the much lauded Minnesota Agricultural College 
numbers among her presidents an M. A. C. man. and 
on her faculty are a Massachusetts graduate and an 
ex man, It Is too bad that an institution such as this, 












26 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 





supported by the state with the object in view of pro- 
moting the general welfare, cannot at all times receive, 
at least, fair treatment from the public Dress. We 
make no claims to being perfect ; but we do affirm 
that the college is doing a good work and that the 
State of Massachusetts nowhere puts an amount of 
money equal to that received by the college to a better 
use. 



The laws relating to penalties for cutting timber, 
wood or carrying away sedge, grass, hay or any kind 
of corn. etc. from the land of another have recently 
been amended by adding the words * or who cuts or 
takes theretrom any ferns, flowers or shrubs. The 
person who wilfully commits this act without license 
of the owner thereof, shall be punished by imprison- 
ment for not more than six months or by a fine of 
not more than five hundred dollars, and if the offence 
is committed on the Lord's day or in a disguise, or 
secretly in the night time the imprisonment shall not 
be less than five days nor the fine less than five dol- 
lars." President Goodell has obtained legal advice 
on this law and finds that the only thing for a student 
seeking specimens to do is to seek the owner of the 
certain land, certain flowers, may be on and obtain 
"the license of owner." The enforcement of this 
law will be watched with interest. We can see 
wherein the law will benefit the owners of pastures.etc, 
near the cities where thousands of city people flock on 
Sundays and holidays but what of the farmer who 
finds a solitary, harmless lover of nature plucking 
some small insignificant blossom from his 250 acre 
wood lot ? Shall he seek redress ? Of course, if he 
be a crank. Now to probe the exact course of the 
passage of this amendment we will find that a certain 
-tablishment in New York is responsible. Their 
representatives were recently sent out to Stockbridge 
and there camped for a summer. During their stay 
they shipped box after box of wild flowers to their 
firm in New York. The citizens of Stockbridge 
became indignant and now the botanist who is working 
diligently for a collection of 200 specimens has got 
to spend invaluable time seeking owners to obtain per- 
mission to pick these. This state with its acres and 
acres of undeveloped woodland is no longer open for 
flower collectors. You must admire but not pluck. 
From some standpoints the law is rather harsh after all. 



The feeling among the student body over the. can- 
celling of the Amherst game has been one of great 
disappointment ; but every man in college stands 
behind our management heart and soul. Our mana 
ger did every thing in his power to bring about the 
game, except he would not take water and allow 
Amherst to dictate highhandedly at points where foot- 
ball custom and a manly spirit would allow two parties 
to enter into the bargain. The exact points of dif- 
ference between the two managements have been 
ciearly stated in another column and it is not neces- 
sary to repeat them here. College sentiment, how- 
ever, goes a step further, and a feeling is not wanting 
that Amherst did not wish to meet us on the gridiron 
this year. The two teams are very evenly matched 
as to weight and football skill ; although in the matter 
of score comparison Amherst has a distinct advan- 
tage. Brown is the only college that has played 
both M. A. C. and Amherst this year. Our game 
with Brown was played under circumstances very 
unfavorable to our team and resulted in a score of 27 
to in Brown's favor, while Amherst managed to 
win her game 5 to 0. Our team, after playing three 
hard games in less than two weeks, Holy Cross, 
Dartmouth and Williams, went to Providence in a 
rather battered condition and arrived there twenty 
minutes after the scheduled time for the game to 
begin. They went directly to the football field and 
prepared for the game; consequently they played with- 
out the snap and dash which has so characterized the 
team this year. The very next week we beat Wes- 
leyan 24 to 6. and the week later we met Springfield 
Training School's strong team, which held Yale to a 
score of six points, and defeated them 11 to 0. We 
do not accuse Amherst of being afraid of defeat at 
our hands for we believe that she was not ; but we 
feel that she wished to avoid our game in order to 
save her players for her hard games yet to be played 
with Holy Cross, Dartmouth, and Williams, and that 
shj took a very unsportsmanlike way to accomplish 
her purpose. It is a pity that the two colleges cannot 
meet at football on an equal footing. The attendance 
at the game has always been as good and probably 
better than at any other game which Amherst plays 
on Pratt Field, and the M.A. C. supporters fully equal, 
and we believe exceed those of Amherst. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



87 



/Vthletic No*tS- 

FOOTBALL. 

Massachusetts, 39; Worcester Tech., 0. 

In the first game played on the campus this season 
issachusetts smothered W. P. I. in a rough game 
|the decisive score of 39-0. 
he Worcester team came on the field late, and 
the kick-off until the whistle announced the end 
the game, it was evident that Massachusetts 
:nded to wipe out the score of two years ago. 
^obb kicked to the goal line, Merrick running the 
to the 20 yard line. Massachusetts held and 
>rcester punted to Cobb. Line plunges advanced 
ball ten yards. A fumble lost us the ball on their 
yard line. Peters tried a quarterback run but was 
[own for a loss of 5 yards. Peters then punted to 
litaker. Whitaker made 10 yards through the line 
Lewis hurdled for five more. With the ball on 
25 yard line Munson went around right end for a 
yard run for a touchdown. Cobb missed the goal, 
irtin kicked off to Chlckering who was tackled by 
litaker. Peters made a 15 yard run through a 
:en field and then Massachusetts held for downs. 
Inson made ten yards outside of tackle and Whitaker 
:ked the line for four more. Phibrick was pushed 
>ugh for four yards and Munson carried tne ball to 
three yard line. Whitaker carried the ball over 
the second touchdown. Munson failed to kick the 
. Chickering kicked off to Philbrick, who advanced 
ball 15 yards. A cross -tackle play added five 
►re, then Whitaker went around Worcester's right 
for a brilliant run of 65 yards for a touchdown, 
inson kicked the goal, 
'orcester elected to receive the kick off and Cobb 
booted the leather over the goal line and Whitaker 
fell on the ball scoring five points for Massachusetts 
In Jess than a minute of play. Munson failed to kick 
the goal. Again Worcester kicked off. the ball 
going to Martin who ran the ball to Worcester's 35 
yard line. A few line plunges advanced the ball to 
Worcester's four yard line and Munson was pushed 
0r for a touchdown. Martin kicked the goal. 

fn the second half Massachusetts made many 
stitutions but still Worcester was unable to stop 
Massachusetts from scoring twice. For W. P. J. 




good game while 
played well for 



Peters and Chlckering played a 

Munson, Whitaker and Cobb 
Massachusetts. 
Line up : — 

MASSACHUSETTS. , WORCESTER TECH. 

Martin. (Clark) 1. e. r. e., Burke 

Gardner. I. t. r. t., Manning 

Carey (Holcomb) I. g. r g,, Kurtz 

Patch, c. c. Bacon 

Ladd. (Cutter) r. g. 1. g., Bliss 

Craighead, r. t. 1. t.. Malone 

Tupper. (Allen) r. «. 1. e., Chickering 

Cobb. q. b. q. b.. Peters 

Lewis. (Munson) (Taft) 1. h. b. r, h. b.. Hackett 

Whitaker. (Peters) r. h. b. 1. h. b.. Headburry 

Munson. (Philbrick) f. b. f. b., Merrick 

Score — Massachusetts 39, W. P. 1. 0. Touchdowns — 

Munson 3, Whitaker 3, Taft. Goals from touchdowns — 

Munson 2. Martin, Cobb. Refree — Trail. Umpire— Collins. 

Linesmen — Cottrell and Kennedy. Time — 25 and 20 min- 
ute periods. 



TO THE ALUMNI. 

The secretary of the Athletic Board, in behalf of 
the student body and of the Board, wishes to thank 
those of the Alumni who have contributed so liberally 
to the support of this season's football team. The 
only soliciting has been done through statements of 
the records of the team and an estimate of the amount 
of money necessary to carry out the plans initiated. 
An opportunity has thus been given to every alumnus 
(his address being known) to contribute. 

While many have generously sent more than was 
suggested in the circular, and a goodly number have 
been heard from, still the polls are open and there is 
yet an opportunity for those to help us, who may have 
overlooked this circular. 

We desire, further, that the alumni should know our 
attitude concerning the cancelling of the M. A. C.- 
Amherst game. 

There were several points of difference between the 
two managements. These were as follows : — 

1st. Our manager desired a date In November. 
Amherst insisted on October 29. This date was 
agreed upon. 

2nd. In view of the large gate receipts that can 
always be counted on for this game our management 
asked for a guarantee of $150. This was refused. 
One hundred and twenty-five dollars was then asked for. 
This was also refused and the statement made that 



*9\ 







38 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



This 



the game must be played for $100 or not at all 
proposition was accepted. 

3rd. As we have a relatively small number of 
players it was desired that 25 minute halves should be 
played. To this Amherst would not agree but stated 
that the decision would be made just before the game. 
4th. Two officials were early mentioned by 
Amherst and taken under consideration by our man- 
agement. After careful investigation Amherst was 
notified (on the Monday preceding the date fixed for the 
game) that one of the officials was not acceptable. 
Two others were named by our manager. One of 
these was not acceptable to Amherst. He was 
dropped. The other was agreed upon but it was found 
that he could not serve. Amherst then stated that 
the game must be played with the officials first named 
or not at all. In support of this position Amherst 
claimed that the protest came too late. It is suffi- 
cient comment to state that Amherst, in the game 
with Columbia, protested an official on the field. 

It was felt that to play under officials in whose per- 
fect impartiality we had not confidence would be a 
mistake and our manager refused to play. His action 
was unanimously and enthusiastically supported by the 
students in mass meeting. 

The letters which we have received from the alumni 
have encouraged us not a little. These have come 
from all parts of the country and many of them from 
men in the early classes who show the same enthusi- 
asm and interest In M. A. C. athletics that we find in 
the more recent graduates. This means more to the 
undergraduates and more to the college than the 
amount alone of the subscription, much as we value 
the latter and more material expression of loyalty. 
For these and past indications of your interest In us 
and In our college activities we again heartily thank 

you. 

S. Francis Howard, 

Sec. and Treas. M. A. C. Ahletlc Board. 



Guarantees 
Holy Cross 
Trinity 
Amherst 
Millers Falls 
Williams 

Springfield Tr. School 
Andover 
Bowdoin 
Northampton 
Northampton 
Wesleyan 



$25.00 
30.00 
5.00 
27.50 
50.00 
25.00 
60.00 
75.00 
75.00 
30.00 
60.00 



-$462.5 



Expenditures. 



MANAGER'S REPORT BASEBALL, SPRING 

OF 1904. 

Receipts. 

Taxes $283.75 

Subscriptions 7 400 

Gate receipts &-80 

Basketball Ass'n 27.06 

Football Ass'n 10-00 



Colby 

Boston College 

Trips 
Holy Cross 
Trinity 
Amherst 
Millers Falls 
Williams 

Springfield Tr. School 
Maine Trip 
Northampton 
Northampton 
Wesleyan 
Greenfield 
Springfield 
Liniments, etc.. 
Base Ball remade 
Football bills 

Campion & Fish 

Reading Room 
Mileage (Coach Bowler) 
Baseball, bats 
Stationery and Printing 
Telephones and Telegrams 
Shoes (l pr.) 
Stamps 
Express 
Umpires 

Wright and Ditson 
Sundries 

Total 



$864.1 



$50. 
53.1 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



$864 
864 



Deficit 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. A. Quigley, Manage 

This report is apparently correct. I have seen no voucl 

H. J Franklin. Auditc 



Collet Notts- 

ext Saturday is the day of the game with Pitts- 
thletlc Association. 

'eakes, 1906, and A. H. M. Wood have been 
ted corporals In the battalion, 
rofessor Walker and his family have moved 
Is new house on Lincoln avenue, 
rofessor Fletcher, '96, from Cornell university 
en about college for the past week, 
r. Forrlstall, superintendent of the farm, 
Uly passed a few days in New Hampshire. 

large number of the students have taken 
itage of the reduced railroad rates and returned 
to vote. 

L. Adams. '05, attended the flower show 

•ecently in Boston by the Massachusetts Horti- 

al society. 

large number of alumni returned to town last 

lay and many attended the Springfield-Tech 

in Springfield. 

rofessor Waugh while in Boston last week 
the annual chrysanthemum show held by the 
Horticultural society. 

anager Newhall has made arrangments through 
. F. Cassidy of Pittsfield for a game of foot- 
ith a New York college team to be played in 
[field on Thanksgiving day. 
iss Ella Hall, college librarian, has returned 
ler visit at the Exposition where she passed a 
devoting most of the time to library work, 
he florlcultural division from the Senior class 
d the annual chrysanthemum show of Mr. 
at Northampton, Nov. 3, and later visited the 
louses at the college. 

'he students from the Junior class, in Landscape 
ing visited the grounds at Smith college last 
for the purpose of studying the ornamental shrubs 
indscape effects about the grounds. 
Bk. new bulletin upon the the " Union of Scion 
nd Stock," containing many excellent photographs 
lustratlng the various points, has been written by 
^rofessor Waugh. It Is the result of thorough inves- 
igatlon upon the subject and should be of much value 
-j horticulturists. 



A set of lockers are to be placed in the drill hall 
for the use of the basketball condidates. This has 
been something for which the students have long felt 
the need and the step will be heartily appreciated. 

— F. C. Canning received a prize of ten dollars 
from the photograph contest conducted by Dreer & 
Co., wholesale seed dealers. The awards were based 
upon the merits of the photographs with respect to 
their value as Illustrating some point In floriculture. 

— President Goodell has been notified that the col- 
lege exhibit at the St. Louis exposition was awarded 
the grand prize by the jurors on awards. The exhibit 
occupied spaces in both the Agricultural and the 
Educational buildings. The commercial high school 
of New York has asked for part of the exhibit; but the 
greater part is to be returned to the college where it 
is to be saved. 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

The first informal dance of the year was held at the 
drill hall last Saturday immediately after the football 
game with Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Owing 
to the fact that all football men were restrained from 
participating, the attendance was somewhat less than 
usual. But nevertheless a very pleasant evening was 
enjoyed by all present. Music was furnished by War- 
ner's orchestra of Northampton and the catering done 
by Brown of Amherst. It is hoped when the next 
informal is held, after the football season is over, that 
all students who dance will take a special interest In 
these gatherings which are held to promote the social 
interests of the college. 

Those present were Mrs. Orcott, Smith ; Mrs. 
Paige. Mrs. Babson, Mrs. Hasbrouck, Amherst, and 
Miss Sanborn, Mt. Holyoke. as patronesses. From 
the alumni were G. D. Jones and Miss Cowles, 
Amherst ; Edward Proulx and Miss Jones, South 
Framingham ; W. V. Tower and Miss Tower, Smith ; 
E. B. Snell and Miss Proulx, Smith ; W. E. Totting- 
ham and Miss Farrar, Westfield Normal. From the 
undergraduates — C. S. Holcomb and Miss Perry, 
Smith ; Storkes, W. P. I. and Miss Reed. Mt. Hol- 
yoke ; Shattuck, W. P. I. and Miss Quimby, Mt. 
Holyoke ; J. F. Lyman and Miss Jenks, Smith ; W. 
M. Sears ; A. N. Swain and Miss Lee, Mt. Holyoke ; 
A. D. Taylor and Miss Hagermann, Mt. Holyoke ; L. 






t^ 






30 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



3* 



S. Walker and Miss Bates. Pelham ; P. F. Williams 
and Miss May. Smith; F. L. Yeaw and Miss 
Sears. Westfield Normal; W. W. Colton and Miss 
Sears'. Mt. Holyoke ; E. F. Gaskell and Miss Jones. 
Springfield; E. P. Mudge and Miss King. Mt Hol- 
yoke; H.M. Russell and Miss Warner, Northamp- 
ton; H. A. Suhlke and Miss Carlton. Mt. Holyoke ; 
W. O. Taft and Miss Sanborn, Salem ; W. D. Bar- 
low and Miss Tanner. Smith ; C. H. Chadwick and 
Miss Livers. Boston; C. B. Bates and Miss Roberts. 
Smith ; J. C. Pagliery and Miss Swain. Smith. 



A COLLEGE MEMORABILIA. 

There is a movement now being agitated by the 
President, Dr. Stone and Miss Hall to purchase a set 
of leather bound scrap albums to keep a College 
Memorabilia. This should be encouraged both by 
undergaduates and alumni. Every man who finds a 
newspaper article written upon any subject of interest 
to M. A. C. or in fact any item worthy of note to 
place in such a record should feel it his duty to send 
the same to the President. Athletic accounts, scien- 
tific articles written by professors, alumni or under- 
graduates. Prom, notices. Fraternity. Class and 
Alumni Banquet Menus etc., etc.. are a few things we 
would suggest. 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING A FINE ART m m QWS . or of quietness and rest at the close of 



In »i! 
to*i 

± 



the soft, subdued light across the landscape. 

>re told that Sophocles was Indeed the first who 

le kind of scene-painting made use of landscape 

Jgighten the effect of dramatic performances, 
not until we come to recent years do we find 
mce of a real appreciation of the beautiful that 

lies nil about us. 

tie primary purpose of the fine arts is to give 
^ssion to the sense of beauty. " And beauty." 
iRuskin. '• is a thing by itself, not dependent upon 
, or usefulness, or custom, or association of ideas, 
eh it is certainly connected with all of them." 
Je sense of beauty," says Darwin. '« in its simplest 
^| is nothing more than the reception of a peculiar 




M. A. C.'S EXHIBIT AT ST. LOUIS. 

It was with great pleasure that the student-body 
listened the other morning to the announcement of 
President Goodell that the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college had been awarded the grand prize by 
the Louisiana Purchase exposition for its exhibit at 
St. Louis. This prize was presented to M. A. C for 
containing the most comprehensive as well as the 
best arranged set of exhibits ; in short, it is regarded 
as the most typical of all the exhibits made by that 
unique class of colleges of which our Alma Mater Is 
In the foreground. 

So far, efforts to discover what the Grand prize is. 
whether a medal or a sum of money, have proved 
fruitless, as Mr. George E. Gay. the Massachusetts 
commissioner of education, has been unable to learn 
from the committee on the award of prizes. At any 
rate, we know that it is the largest prize awarded at 
the World's fair in the department of education. 



The spirit of art no doubt found its first definite ; 
large embodiment in architecture. We find 
crude drawings of the home, the royal dwelling 
the abode of a god. Later, emblazoned alonj 
walls, the rows of human figures in a variety of p. 
tion and condition tell, to a later age, a history of 
time, and finally there came into the minds 
people, a hint of the world they lived in, and w< 
the representation of a tree, a river, a desert, a m: 
tain. But for ages the only Idea of the artist la; 
the representation of things through the medium 
architecture, sculpture, and painting. •« recalling. 
doings and feelings of man or the man-god." W 
all about there lay untouched a vast region rich 

beautiful, the grand, the emotional. Landsc^^B f p | easure from certain colors, forms and 
offered this to art, and it was only by slow dep^K, . » and more t han this, it may be said that this 
that the latter saw and seized the opportunity. ^^ ( the beautiful is not purely intellectual, but 

But what Is landscape? Webster says it " IS 'eOMftfonal as well. 
pictorial aspect of the country. But how inadequs^ t he ldea j landscape garden," says Professor 
■ This green earth " we say, or " that blue "fjXy. •■ like the Ideal landscape painting, expresses 
Such vague and general terms may serve for of ^phasizes some single thought or feeling. Its 
occasion.— nay. may sufficiently express all expression may be gay. bold, retired, quiet, florid ; 
some minds care to see. But how feebly d° ''but If it is natural, its expression will conform to the 
represent the real spectacle, with its infinite v; p i ace and tne purpose, and the expressions are not 
and harmony of color. The panorama of Natv^^K rs f ru i e . |t should be a picture, not a collec- 
wonders seems to have been unrevealed to pa t ion of interesting objects. For landscape gardening 
and poet alike. It is said that no race of man I. muit be sharply distinguished from gardening : the 
in a wild country has ever enjoyed landscape. 1 former is the making of pictures with plants; the 
pleasure that belongs to modern times, to highly latter is the growing of plants without reference to the 
ized nations, to cultivated minds. And it is ptctur-. In one the interest centers in art ; in the 
appreciation of the beauties of natural scenery gjB \\ center in plants." And in that lies the sub- 
has developed landscape gardening and classe: rti M e f the whole matter. Landscape gardening is 
among the fine arts of the present day. That thKt of beautifying nature, " for landscape." says 
appreciation was lacking in early ages Is evldence:fj^t. " Is. after all. the creation of art. It was the 
the fact that few writers refer to nature in their * artistic eye that discovered landscape in the surround- 
and indeed when they do speak of nature effects mg tcene of things, the poetic vision had frequent 
without careful observation or true apprecia; foretastes of its charm." 

their beauty. " Every Homeric landscape inter Although landscape gardening is chiefly a matter 
to be beautiful." says Ruskln. " is composed of taste, still there are certain rules which should be 
fountain, a meadow, and a shady grove." cooaldered in the making of the picture and in the 

It is said of Socrates that he cared very littlej^Hg. It would be as absurd and out of place to 
walking outside the walls of Athens. " Trees fashion an Italian garden at the side of a farm house 
fields tell me nothing." he says. •' men are my te; r eaeate a rockery in a two by four city yard, as it 
ers." There was no meaning in the subtle r *H be to meet a Titian landscape in a laborer's 
change of light and shade among the trees ; no aP*tS These rules or principles are the same that 
elation of the harmony of colors along the fields .-would govern the creation of any picture either upon 



the cloth canvas of the artist or upon the greensward 
of Nature. Harmony and strength of effect must be 
obtained, and these can be obtained only through 
clearness of arrangement, repetition or regularity, 
and contrast, or variety, with the uniting of all the 
several parts Into one pleasing whole. Van Dyke 
says of the artist's work, •• Pictorial composition may 
be defined as the proportionate arrangment and unify- 
ing of the different features and objects of a picture. 
There must be an exercise of judgment on the part of 
the artist as to harmony of relation, proportion, color. 
light ; and there must be a skillful uniting of all the 
parts Into one perfect whole." 

But here the landscape gardener's work is far more 
difficult than that of the painter ; the latter has his 
canvas, a very limited field for work. His arrange- 
ment of parts, and proportionate relationship of 
objects, is a simple matter of the pencil or brush ; 
and his setting and sky-line are dead. Not so. how- 
ever, with the landscape gardener, he deals with living 
colors, a living sky, and living objects, whose Infinite 
variety of change demands a close observation of, and 
intimate acquaintanceship with Nature. He must be 
able to associate his several parts so that they shall 
respond to the varying moods and capers of Nature. 

He is the great artist who is able to have his pic- 
ture appreciated throughout the entire year. In the 
very desolation of winter there must be a ple?sing 
prospect. The red twigs and berries of the dogwood, 
viburnum.and barberry must harmonize with the clean, 
gaunt limbs of the Glngko and Kentucky coffee tree, 
and the dark tones of the pine. fir. hemlock, and rho- 
dodendron. In the springtime the blood courses In the 
veins with a fresh vigor as we look out upon the har- 
monious blending of the shades of green in the 
larches, chestnuts, poplars, oaks, and elms with the 
red maples and purple birches and the darker shades 
of the evergreen ; and with the colors of the mag- 
nolia, jessamine, lilac, and the snow of the fruit trees, 
and every shrub in its gayest dress ; and all in perfect 
harmony. In the heat of the midsummer, the mass 
of foliage from the trees and vines seems to ease the 
troubled spirit of the most restless. It is not the 
brightness of color then that is desired, but the soft- 
ened shade, and the cool retreats. In the autumn, In 
the Bacchanalian revel of colors, the landscape gar- 
dener proves his worth as a true artist in the harmon - 









3* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



33 



ious arrangement of his plants, due to his intimate 
knowledge of their character and the tone of their 

foliage. 

Landscape gardening a fine art? It is the fine art 
of all fine arts. In no picture however perfect is 
there found the infinitely varying degrees of light and 
shadow, or texture and color. In no poem however 
inspiring is the soul lifted to such heights as in the 
contemplation of Nature. But this power to arrange 
natural effects into an artistic composition is not 
granted to everyone in the same degree. Just as we 
c insider the genius of an Angelo. Titian, or Rubens, 
to be a natural gift, so is the genius of a Downing, an 
Olmsted, and an Elliott. Men who can turn barren 
wastes and disease-breeding swamps into a very para- 
dise of beauty and health are not only benefactors of 
the noblest rank, but artists of the highest type. And 
this is the work of the true landscape gardener — to 
beautify the world, and to make it a good place to 

live in. R. R. Raymoth, '04. 

. ^ 

THE DECADENCE OF THE AGRICULTURAL 

FAIR. 

" The world renowned Carrie Nation was present, 
and expounded her own ideas to the open mouthed 
crowds hanging breathless on her wisdom. And so 
were the noted three ring tumblers and acrobats, 
the Kitson brothers, direct from One Lung's circus. 
As for the midway, all hitherto attempts to exploit 
fakirs from Faklrville paled into the sickly insignifi- 
cance of much diluted crabapple cider. ' The mid- 
way will be full of fakirs this year, and we hardly have 
enough room to meet their demands. ' Large Bear 
and three little cubs were all there ; and so was a 
monkey running an automobile, and smoking a pipe : 
and likewise three long legged dogs harnessed abreast, 
driven by a bull pup in a sulky ; and so with an 
aggregation of wonderfully trained animals from 

Coney Island of such sweet odor. " 

* i * # • 

" Exactly 26 cheap fakirs, side shows and petty 
gambling devices by actual count disgraced the 
Northampton fair held last week. In one end of a 
small show case in the tent given over to agricultural 
products rested a ten-pound tub of butter, and two 
parcels of creamery prints, these constituting the 
the sole dairy display. " 



***** ^Bts and a half-dozen " fakirs " as the sum total 
Over on the west side of an enterprising their attractions. 
twenty miles south of Boston the- electrics pd^M ld fashioned '• cattle-show " has seen its day. 
large area enclosed with a high board fence a: jHuhed an annual meeting place for the farmer, 
which appear the roofs of numerous builc.^H as an incentive to excell the exhibit of his 
Through the various open gateways one ca ;|ghbor. Then when its work was needed no more 
glimpses of extensive grounds and a well-kept r^H obliged either to change its character to fit 
track. If you walk down the Belchertown roa: iang|ng conditions or else dwindle away, the relic of 




er generation In so doing it has simply done 
human establishments, In fact, we ourselves, 
, conform to present conditions. This is the 
f the decadence of the agricultural fair. 

K., '07. 



in Amherst, a mile or two. you will pass a 

similarly enclosed but scarcely as large and witrj 

one or two buildings located upon it. Yet boi 

these establishments produce annually wh 

locally known as a " cattleshow. " 

What is the cause for the difference In pros: , 

wnansi c J the STRUGGLE IN THE EAST 

of these two agricultural fairs? The causes u 
produce these effects apply to all of this class At the present time, when It would not be surpris- 
throughout New England. All started from a * ■* any rr.oment to hear that Port Arthur had 
or less purely agricultural basis and then one »»*•* it Is right io consider the probable results, 
pushed forward becoming cosmopolitan in cha-;»OUM the Japanese come out victorious in this war. 
while the other type receeded gradually in impor: When the struggle began a few months ago. the 
until at last they sank Into a dull legarthy which ***** for little Japan were so small that the sym- 
but to a peaceful end. lthles of the world were with that countr y- h was 

The managers of the first mentioned group*. PWhaps. so much because Japan seemed to be in 
ized that times were rapidly advancing and »• *&* and Russla in the wron g' as il was for the 
unless they advanced too, the tide of affairs .«"«« ° f admiration for a country of her size who 
soon leave them behind. They added to their a -««Ulspute the advance of the great Russian Bear, 
tions They pushed the agricultural exhibits h « V^Pathy was with the -under dog." Since then 
remote corner, developed the possibilities of 3 *«* r the Japanese have demonstrated their great 
Introduced band concerts. vau ravery and strength, and have surprised the world, 

f jre -3t by the way they have withstood the Russians, 



race-course, 

performances, balloon ascensions, even 
musters and last but not least they called sco 
•• fakirs " to their ranks to assist In attracting 
public. But it must be admitted that only 
fairs held near large centers of population have 
able to expand upon such a grand scale. The) | 
advanced so far as to be hardly included unde 
"agricultural fairs. " 

Of the other type, many were naturally pla 



he way they have continually defeated and 
hem. 

ow do the nations of the world wish to see 

ntinually victorious, and force Russia to yield 

demands ? What would be the result if the 

should win a decisive victory ? We may 

ell pause a moment and consider, it would be a 

hristltn nation overcome by a pagan nation. In all 

robabllty this would soon lead to a general awake- 




the heart of a farming district and apart fro 

, , , . . . . ,. ^ „„ , Jng Of all the eastern powers, and as they became 

village near which they were located the coun!' • v ' ... 

* , . T . , ., , . „„, „. ronger and more assertive, they would be a menace 
sparsely settled. Therefore they could not af ■ 3 

r / . _. , , > the western civilized countries. 

large attendance even had they attempted to . 

* ... , ..,, ... ... So far as our own interests are concerned, t 

They were obliged to stand still while their ' .... _ 

* . , . ... 'ould leem to be better for America if the Russians 
near the large cities advanced, and they soon '- 

..,,.. i j w re victorious. Japan, successful in this war, threat- 

behind. Many of them have already been obliQ J / , 

. ,. , , ... . na to be our most dangerous rival In commerce with 

cease their exhibitions while others are str ,, 

hopelessly along. These present to us a fe**^^ 



When we read, in Roman history of Hannibal, the 
great general of the Carthaginians, we cannot help 
but sympathize with him. After reading of the difficul- 
ties and hardships he underwent In reaching Italy, and 
of the great number of men he lost on the way, we 
are gratified to hear of his decisive and continuous 
victorories over the great Roman armies. It Is with 
real sorrow that we hear of his last years in southern 
Italy, and of his final defeat and suicide. Yet when 
we stop to consider the results if the Carthaginians 
had conquered, we cannot but be glad that It turned 
out as it did. If the great, cultured Roman republic 
had been overcome by the Carthaginians, civilization 
would have received a great set-back. Cannot the 
same be true of the present struggle between Russia 

and Japan ? 

H. '07 



Dfp&rtmfrvf JMcrt^s. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Owing to the large number of 1905 men who 
elected Entomology, three had to give up the course 
as the present accomodations at the laboratory are 
for twelve men. The neccessity of enlarging the 
laboratory is strongly felt and the department hopes 
to do this In the near future. 

The following men are taking post graduate work 
with Entomology as their major : W. V. Tower. ' 03, 
E. A. Back, ' 04. 

There is a very Interesting and instructive article 
this month In the Canadian Entomologist Vol. 
XXXVI. No. 10, written by Mr. Back, 1904. who is 
pursuing a post graduate course here this year. The 
title of the article is "New Species of North Ameri- 
can Arilidae." This contribution is an enlargement 
upon Mr. Back's graduation thesis and comprises a 
detailed description of the following insects : Dasyllls- 
clnerea, Dasyllis Fernaldl. Sarapogon allifrons. 
Ospriocerus Albifasciatus and Anlsopogon Johnsonl. 
CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The investigation of the official collection of com- 
mercial fertilizers Is progressing rapidly at the Station. 
A bulletin in this work will appear the last of this 
month. 

Samples of soil, peat and muck have bsen sent in 






34 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



35 






for analysis, in numbers far exceeding previous years. 

Mr. Henri Haskins has been making a thorough 
investigation of butter samples sent in for analysis by 
the Association of Official Chemists. 

Proulx '03, is at present collecting tobacco sam- 
ples and also obtaining an estimate of the tobacco 
crop. 

BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Cities and towns in the vicinity of Boston and 
Springfield, having trouble between their respective 
tree wardens and superintendents of local electrical 
companies have called in Dr. Stone for scientific 
advice on the question of the injurious effects of elec- 
tricity upon shade trees. The writer happened to pick 
up a certain local newspaper recently which devoted 
a whole page to one of the Doctor's discussions on 
the subject. Many of his half tone photos of injured 
trees are reproduced and all leads to the general 
conclusion that the recent investigations at the Station 
are proving of invaluable service to our cities and 
towns throughout the state. 

Photographs of injured trees are coming into the 



Young Men's Clothing 



With all the " Kinks of Fashion 
and plenty of assortment .'. .• 

THAT'S US. 



Springfield, 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 




in daily accompanied with notes and descriptions 

keep the department busy answering queries. 

It to gratifying to note the interest the people of the 

stall are manifesting In regard to their ornamental 

and shade trees Dr. Stone recentiy examined a 

nua^er of trees in Springfield affected by illuminat- 

s. 

Vo delegations from Mt. Holyoke College recently 

kd the college grounds to admire the botanical 

horticultural specimens on the hill. Miss Ander- 

Ihe Asst. Botanist at Mt. Holyoke had charge of 

irties. 

fARTMENT OF FOODS AND FEEDING, 

HATCH EXPERIMENT STATION, 
jring the past year the Department of Foods and 
ling has published four bulletins. Two of these 
related to the Inspection of concentrated feeds, one 
treated of the composition, digestibility and feeding 
value of distillery and brewery by-products, and 
another discussed the nutritive effect of dried molass- 
es-beet-pulp. This latter bulletin also contained an 
article by Mr. P. H. Smith, entitled "The Nutrition 
of Horses." The article was printed In full In a 
recent issue of the Springfield Republican . 

The department is at present engaged in the 
examination of a large number of feeds collected by 
Mr. Albert Parsons, and Intends publishing a bulletin 
on the subject during the next month. 

The value of molasses and molasses feeds is being 
given consideration both at the laboratory and at the 
feeding barn. 
th' tfr. Parsons will shortly begin his annual inspect- 
ion Of Babcock machines in use in creameries and 
milk depots In Massachusetts. 

S. R. Parker of the department. Is constantly 
engaged in testing the productive capacity of pure 
Prizes, Contingent Prize and other Prizes for little folks and big folks. Send 10c br "l cow * ! " some of the large dairy herds of 

for Business Penman, 12 Writh.g Mottoes, sarople rapid Writing, billed Birc^l IZVl^ZT F°T aL's" 

Easton, and trustee N. I. Bowditch of 



Surprise PRIZES given away. 

to get the people to talk about blxlkrs' physical training in penmanship, 
best method of instruction in the world — Saves 90 per cent, of time, etc. 

Merit Prizes, Surprize Prizes, Prize Prizes, Sure Prizes, Big Prizes, Littl 



WRITE US FOR FREE PAMPHLET. 

A CURB FOR 

PIMPLES 

With letters from physicians mul 

draggttti >uttag resuiis obtained. 

DERM-ASEPTIC 

SKIN LOTION NEVER FAILS 

It Makes Rough Complexions 
Smooth and Soft as Velvet. 

We will upon ftgaail "'ft" the pamphlet to you in a 
plalu envelope, and you will he convinced. 

All Druggists Sell It. 



DERM ASCEPTIC CO., 

CHICAOO. 



I :i'.'r<).nATIC 



Shoe Repairing Nearly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 



H*. W. SLOAN, 

Amhkkst, Mars. 



W. M. Seae*. mi.'.. 



r. K. Shaw, *07. 



A Full Lino of 



Flourish, and full particulars. (1 Surprise Prize will be included, worth 

FlWtllngham. 



froE. 



10c. to a dollar, and a $10 Prize Prize goes with each 100th 10c 
ditional.) 



Order — COI)' A neat folder has recently been issued, stating the 
different lines of work undertaken by the department. 
It contains a photograph of the Chemical Laboratory 
Prof. G. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. and of the Station Creamery. 

Ytles entering class is fifty smaller this year than 
It w» last. 



Students' Supplies 



AT THK 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 



i 



J 




3* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Alu 



mm. 



71. — W. H. Bowker has just returned from a trip 
to California. 

'95. — Jasper Marsh. W. L. Morse and H. S. Fair- 
banks visited the college recently. 

'96. — M. E. Sellew is at present teaching in West 
Springfield. 

'01. — F. L. Arnold, Chemist, Merrimac Chemical 
Co., Woburn. 

'01. — D. S. Greely Assistant in Hydraulic Turbine 
Department of Altis Chalmers Co., 147 W. 71st St., 
New York, N. Y. 

•02. — J. H. Belden spent a few days here last week. 

'02. — C. I. Lewis teaching Botany. Zoology, Ento- 
mology. Physiology and Geology in Alfred University. 
Alfred. N. Y. 

'03.— E. M. Poole. G. L. Barrus and S. C. Bacon 
were among those disappointed in not seeing the 
Amherst game last week. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 



') 



The largest stock and the lowest prices In town. 

Agents for the celebrated Quyer Hats and A. B. Klrsch- 

baum & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, FERRIN awd H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON A THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Hmberst Ibouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRIGK, PRormierom. 



On Tour Wag Home 



STOP AT 



Johnson's 



for something to read on the way. 

BOOKS, PICTURES, STATIONERY. 
318-815 Main Street, • Springfield, Mass 




HE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



v. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 30, 1904 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

nd Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Am hurst. Mass. The Signal will be 
subscribers until Its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
Iness Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Editor-in Chief. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. Business Manager. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES. 1906. Assistant Business Manager. 
-EN NEWMAN SWAIN. 1905. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT. 1906, Intercollegiate. 

*CY FREDERIC WILLIAMS. 1905, Department Notes. GEORGE HENRY CHAPMAN, 1906. Alumni Notes. 

3ERT DAVIS TAYLOR, 1905, College Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS, 1907. 

THUR ALPHONSE RACICOT, Jr., 1906. EDWIN DANIELS PHILBRICK, 1907, Athletics. 



Belle jjjjj Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



Term*: $l.oo per gear In adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 28c. extra. 



*. C.A 

-Bail Association. 
:ge Senate, 
ding-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. S. Walker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

E. W. Newhall, Jr., Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

W. A. Munson. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Sii Index. 

H, F. Thompson, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manager . 

F. H. Kennedy, Manager. 

G. W. Patch, Pres. 



Entered as seosnd-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 



Cdrt&ri&.s. 



)v7e are greatly disappointed that more men are not 
ng for positions on the Signal board. We still 
>e to see a large number enter into the competi- 
l. and at once. Articles may be handed to any 
mber of the board or put in the Signal mail box in 
rth College. 



Thanksgiving, the first milestone on the college 
d. has been passed, the turkey killed and eaten. 
i can now see the markers along our way getting 
t nearer. Some bring to us anticipations of pleas- 
times and some bring the feeling directly opposite. 
^^^ s Christmas holidays will be upon us before we 

PHOTOGR -A.Ir*Hl£Rdly realize it. and after them the semester's end is 

far away. It is, perhaps, by no means irrelevant to 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



a word at this time about college work. We must 
agree that it is much easier to do each day's task as 
•resents itself ; but still we all know of that fatal 
NORTHAMPTON, MA^ deno * of ,et,in & everything go until the night before 



examinations, and then trying to •■ bone " through. 
There is plenty of time for one who begins now, or 
better still for one who has begun already, to make 
his road to the end of the semester smooth and 
agreeable, but there will be woe for the slothful man 
in February. Let us take the warning. 



Our western states are certainly showing a great 
interest in their agricultural colleges, and by their 
lively interest are strengthening that basis of all whole- 
some civilization in a way that the eastern states would 
do well to copy. The following clippings show how 
the westerner's feeling for his state college manifests 
itself, and we might suggest that if such a feeling 
could be enthused in the New Englander, our state 
colleges here would suddenly find themselves lifted to a 
new plane. •• The up-to-date harvest festival consists 
of a pilgrimage to the agricultural colleges. Last 
season, after threshing out the grain, twenty thousand 
Iowa farmers and their families traveled to the col- 
lege at excursion rates, looked over the latest notions 






u 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




look back upon. The convention opened * 
.. smoker " at the Mu chapter house Thursday e* 
and closed with a banquet at the Hotel Co onadt 



ere< 



in grain machinery and methods, and had a general 
Id time. The idea has spread to Kansas North 

Dakota and Minnesota, and might well be taken^ur- 1^^ ;'— ^ conventi0 n, Saturday 
tner east." " The agricultural colleg a Ames headq ^ ^^ ^ givgn 

iC ted an addition to Agricultural dall.a ^j^sstoiis. Saturday afternoon practical 

whole convention attended the U. of P.. Cflii 
football game on Franklin field. 

Among the alumni of Massachusetts present 

•c « 10 Rarrett '75, Cutter, 82. 

Thompson. 72, Barren, 

Couden, '04. The convention occurred net 
anniversary of Mr. Barrett's birthday and as 
one of the founders of the fraternity a beau 
jeweled fraternity pin was presented to him | 
banquet. „. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



39 



Iowa, has i 

judging pavilion and a new greenhouse. The addi- 
tion to Agricultural Hall is 60 by 100 feet, three stor- 
ies high, and is devoted to farm mechanics, photog- 
raphy and bulletin work. The judging pavilion is two 
Lories high. The lower story is used by the AnUn « 
Husbandry department, the upper one by the Depart- 
ment of Agronomy. The new greenhouse is 38 by 
82 feet, and is so divided as to accommodate Agron- 
omy Soil Physics and Horticulture. An Insectary for 
th e use of the entomological section of the expert. 
m ent station has been erected in <"™f™* X )** 
greenhouse. An addition has been made to the feed- 
ing sheds. A horticultural barn and laboratory has 
JJ, been completed at a cost of $5,000. The new 
dairy building, 60 by 1 10 feet, three stones with 
basement and attic, is of fireproof construction w.th 
pressed brick and cut stone walls and enameled bnck 
tile and pressed brick interior finish 



7uKUti<^N°-t«s 



FOOTBALL. 

The Pittsfield A. A. Game. 
The game on November 12 with the Pi 
cost 1 Athletic Association proved to be the most u 

T^T^Z building will be begun dur- J Alth ough outweighed at every pos.uon._our . 
ing the coming year. This building will cost about 
$250 000. Buildings will be erected and improve- 
ment's made on the dairy farm and poultry department 
during the coming year." It seems entirely .ncon- 
wuous that the West, supposedly so far beh.nd the 

^ ^£21 " ow d r^l^STol i signals. Indeed.some happ. 
its political o^"'" t,ons ' S ftctlvj which for the [ he game could hardly be explained any o he 

namely Agriculture. It is surely time for some of our 
Yankee - mossbacks " to shake off the stupor the has 
fallen over them and. since they cannot lead, at least 
to join In the procession. 



not expect to find it hard to score over their opp: 
but the game was scarcely begun when it was, 
that the defense of the Pittsfield backs was 
phenomenal. Neither rush nor trick plays . 
runs could advance the ball for substantial gain 
it is supposed by some that the Pittsfield team 



lumphed over the Brown and Blue and every game 
been hotly contested. In the second half a dls- 
e arose on Massachusetts' five yard line over who 
on a fumbled ball. The officials ruled in favor of 
A. C, but so much time had been taken in dispute 
,t the game had to be called on account of darkness 
;h eight minutes to play. The teams were quite 
nly matched as to weight, but the Tufts line was no 
Ktch for the Massachusetts' forwards. 
^Massachusetts kicked off to Vlles who was tackled 
on the 20 yard line. After a few rushes Massachu- 
setts received the ball on downs. After advancing the 
ball to the ten yard line. Tufts recovered It on a 
fumble. Tufts made their distance three times but 
was forced to relinquish the ball on their own 25 yard 
line. By straight plunges through Tufts' line Massa- 
chusetts carried the ball to the one yard line where 
Philbrlck was pushed through for the first touchdown. 
K/I. A. C. kicked off to Jones who made a brilliant 
run of 40 yards. Tufts lost the ball on downs but held 
Massachusetts on their 35 yard line. Tufts slowly 
advanced the ball to Massachusetts' 15 yard line where 
lost it on downs. Massachusetts rapidly carried 
ball to the centre of the field where Whitaker 
le a run around Tufts' right end for a touchdown, 
kicked the goal. Time was called soon after 

kick-off. 
the second half Tufts kicked off to Whitaker. 

,ssachusetts advanced the ball to the 40 yard line 
where Cobb punted to Jones. Tufts now began to 
pound the left side of the line for barely the distance. 
but kept the ball and by fierce line plunges carried it 
to the five yard line where the game ended. 




PHI SIGMA KAPPA CONVENTION. 

The twelfth general biennial convention of the Phi 
Sigma Kappa fraternity was held in Philadelphia 
Pa Oct 20th. 21st and 22nd under the auspices of 
the" Mu' chapter of the University of Pennsylvania. 
Every chapter and every club of the fraternity was 
represented and all have a most enjoyable time to 



referee to the home team. At the very close 
first half Pittsfield had the ball near our g: 
At this point time was up. but the referee re;. 
blow his whistle until after another rush was 
The ball was carried over our goal line ; but ir 
ately pushed back and downed a foot from t 
This the referee declared a touchdown. N 
scoring occurred. 

Massachusetts, 1 1 ; Tufts, 0. 
November 18th. the football team closed the 
with a victory over Tufts at Tufts Oval. I 
This is the fourth year that Massachuse" 




BACH U SETTS. 

Hn. 1. e. 
Iner, 1. t. 
Carey (Holcomb) 1 



Tufts. 
r. e,, Sullivan 



r. t.. Hall 
r. g. J. P., Jones 
Patch, c. c ' Resnolds 

L*dd. r. g. I. g. P.. J- Sullivan. (White) 

Cralfhead. r. t. >■ <•• P rinc « 

Tupper. r. e. '• e.. Wilson 

Cobb. q. b. Q- b-. Knowlton 

Munson. I. h, b. r. h. b., Viles. (Smith) 

Whitaker. r. h. b. I h. b., C. P. Jones 

Phtlbrick, f. b. f. b.. Peterson. (Green) 

Score — Massachusetts It*. Touchdowns — Philbrlck, 
WWtaker. Goals from touchdown — Cobb. Umpire— 
Burleigh of Exeter. Referee— Patch of Tufts. Linesmen- 
ley and Peters, Time— 25 minute halves. 



Sophomores, 1 1 ; Freshmen. 0. 
Nov. 17. The annual football game between the 
Sophomore and Freshman teams resulted in a victory 
for the second year men after a well-played contest. 
The Freshman team was much heavier, but showed a 
decided lack of practice, especially on the defense. 
This was particularly true in the second half when the 
light Sophomores pushed the ball the entire length of 
the field on straight line plays. That the Freshmen 
were unable to stop these plays was doubtless due to 
their inexperience. The Sophomore defense was at 
all times strong, showing that their experience on the 
scrub had been for the good. 

The Sophomores kicked off to Nutter who was 
downed on the 20-yard line. By a series of fast plays 
the ball was advanced to the centre of the field 
where they were forced to punt to Peters. '07 fum- 
bled and held the Freshmen for no gain. The Fresh- 
men attempted to punt, but Whitney blocked the ball. 
Thompson recovering the ball for '07. By several 
quarterback runs the Sophomores carried the ball to 
the 20-yard line, where Shaw and Wood slowly worked 
it to the four-yard line on straight line plunges. Shaw 
was pushed over for the first touchdown. Peters 
kicked the goal. The half ended with the ball on the 
Freshman 25-yard line. 

In the second half the Sophomores carried the ball 
the entire length of the field on straight plunges. 
Wood and Shaw hurdling the line for repeated gains. 
Shaw scored the second touchdown. Peters failed to 
kick a difficult goal. For 1907 Peters. Wood and 
Shaw did excellent work, while Nutter, Barry and 
Jackson played well for the Freshmen. The line-up : 

SOPHOMORES. FRESHMEN. 

Walker, l. e. r, e., Negus, Goodwin 

Watkins, 1. t. *■ »•• Chase 

Whitney. 1. g. r - 8- Farlev 

Green, c. c • Jackson 

Thompson, r g. I S- Potter. Damon 

Summers, r. t. I *•• Wheeler 

Clark, r. e. U e., Barry. Douglass, Bates 

Peters (capt.). q. b. q. *>•< Hamburger (capt.) 

Wood. I. h. b. 1> h. b., Nutter 

Shaw. r. h. b. •• h - b • Shattuck 

Pierce, f. b. '• *>.. Brown, Edmunds 
Score— 1907. 11 ; 1908,0. Touchdowns— Shaw 2. Goal 

from touchdown— Peters. Referee— Franklin. 03. Umpire 

— Proulx. '03. Linesmen— Tupper, '05. Kennedy. '06, 

Time — 20-minute halves. 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



4i 



Nov. 12. The second team went to Ludlow and 
played the heavy town team. The Ludlow team is 
one of the strongest teams in this section of the 
state and that they only defeated •• the second team " 
by a score of 18-0 speaks well for our boys. 

Taft. '06, who has been playing sub half-back met 
with a serious injury during a scrub practice lately 
and had to undergo an operation at Pratt hospital for 
a ruptured blood vessel in the spine. 

The baskets have been placed in position and Capt. 
Hunt will soon issue a call for candidates for the 
basketball team. Manager Gardner has arranged a 
fine schedule for this season. We hope to announce 
the complete schedule in our next issue. 



BASKET BALL. 

The defeat of Tufts marked the closing of a most 
successful season in football at the college as well as 
the hardest schedule the team has ever had. The 
time has come now when the abunda nee of basket- 
ball material should be raked over and sifted out. 
Most of the college teams have been working for the 
past three weeks and to overcome this handicap 
means a lot of hard and faithful practice. 

The season has never before opened with such a 
spirit and interest in the game. Last year's class 
carried out with it two of the best players ever repre- 
senting the college and only two regular men from 
last year's team remain. However, with the large 
number of freshmen and the renewed interest taken 
in the sport, no one can be called a fixture in any of 
the positions. A hard schedule will probably be 
presented for the team and still there is little reason 
to believe that the team cannot come up to the 
standard of last year's five. Hard and conscientious 
practice is the key to success, and continuing in the 
spirit with which the men have begun nothing else 
should be e esult. 



possesses the most thorough and varied cultivation, 
will necessarily become the most powerful and happy ; 
the growth or the decay, the real fate of a people 
depends upon this. 

Who shall say that the ball and bat. the pigskin, 
the racket and the hockey stick, and the track events 
do not hold a well deserved place in modern educa- 
tion and thus in the growth of the nation? Since the 
formation of character is the great object of education, 
directed sport becomes an important factor. Steady 
perseverance, patient practice and unselfishness are 
necessary to gain success in athletics. The code of 
honor among true sportsmen demands that truth and 
fair dealing shall always be practised. Manliness, 
courage and energy all follow because they are felt to 
be absolutely essential. Patriotism is naturally fos- 
tered, for one who will make sacrifices for the good 
of his class or college will extend this feeling tenfold 

to his state and country. 

H. '06. 



A PLEA FOR ATHLETICS IN COLLEGES. 

Education has become the real problem of this 
age. All political 



all social controversies at the 
present time concentrate finally in this great question, 
for it is only through an improved popular education 
that the defects of civil and social life can be 
corrected. That nation which, in all its classes. 



EXTENSION TEACHING IN AGRICULTURE. 

I. THE POINT OF VIEW. 

BY PROF. S. W. FLETCHER OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY. 
M. A. C. '96. 

The dominating spirit of the times is the spirit of 
altruism— an unselfish interest in the welfare of 
others. Most unfortunate is the man who looks out 
upon the world of today and sees only its selfishness 
and greed. More than likely he has the distorted vis- 
ion of one whose knowledge of the world is gleaned 
chiefly from the columns of our daily press, with their 
nauseating details of crime, scandal, corruption, sor- 
didness— all that is unlovely in life put in. colored and 
amplified ; and that which is sweet and unselfish left 
out. We hear much about " grinding trusts" and 
•• soul-less corporations." Somebody takes pains to 
tell us that the law of competition which governs bus- 
iness the world over, is •• Get the most you can and 
give the least you must." We hear that the poor are 
taxed by the rich ; that the weak are oppressed by 
the strong. In the opinion of many of these lack- 
lustre eyed, vinegar faced philosophers, as life is 
becoming more strenuous, it is also becoming more 

selfish. 

This is true only in part. In spite of the strong 



currents of selfishness which are set in motion by the 
fierce competition of our modern industrial system, 
there are stronger counter -currents of unselfishness. 
It is not egotism which leads us to believe that never 
before have men and women been so generally con- 
cerned about the welfare of others. Like the Jewish 
lawyer many centuries ago. they are asking the Great 
Altruist, •• Who is my neighbor ? " and are trying to 
follow the teachings of the parable which he gave in 
reply. Never has there been so little of sect and 
caste ; so much of fellowship and brotherhood. 

This growing spirit of altruism Is manifest not only 
in persons but also in communities and peoples. The 
wonderful development within the past few decades of 
free schools, free libraries, free hospitals, free mus- 
eums and other public institutions for promoting the 
happiness and usefulness of the people, has no other 
significance but that the public conscience has been 
quickened to a sense of its responsibility toward the 
individual. Never has the body politic taken such a 
sympathetic interest in the welfare of the individual. 
This is not the growth of paternalism or of socialism. 
It is the growth of the idea of universal brotherhood. 
This idea is nearly 2,000 years old. 

Education has been touched by the altruistic spirit. 
For centuries the door of knowledge was jealously 
guarded by monks and doctors. Only the rich and 
influential, that is. the few. might enter therein. Is it 
very long since the days when there were considered 
to be but four " learned " professions— law. medicine, 
theology, and teaching ? How many are there now ? 
One by one the barriers are being broken down and 
the common people are entering into the possession 
of their birthright— the right to expect and to receive 
training in any legitimate vocation which they desire 
to make their life work. The establishment of the 
land grant colleges of agriculture and mechanic arts 
was a signal advance toward the realization of this 
ideal. These institutions have done more to democ- 
racise education than any other single factor, and 
their Influence will continue to be exerted along this 
line until every Industry in which men and women are 
engaged has been put into pedagogical form. 

But the fact remains that the vast majority of 
people do not go to colleges or training schools. 
Many cannot ; a much larger number will not. 
Because they either cannot or will not. does our 



responsibility towards them cease thereby? It is the 
old, old question, -Am I my brother's keeper?" 
Shall we say to the ambitious young man. who is so 
bound by home ties or other circumstances that he 
cannot go to college. •• My lad. you are most unfor- 
tunate. We are very sorry for you," and go our way? 
Shall we say to the unamoitious young man, whose 
early training and environment has been such that he 
has no desire to bring into his lite the beauty and the 
power of education. " Very well. sir. If you prefar to 
remain in ignorance it is your fault, not ours, and you 
must suffer the consequences ? " The spirit of altru- 
ism in education leads us to try to help each of these 
young men If they cannot or will not turn to the 
light we must carry the light to them. 

The altruism which has seized modern education 
is expressed in many ways. The farmers' institute is 
one way ; the home education work of some state 
libraries is another. Perhaps it is best illustrated in 
what is called university extension teaching— literally 
an effort to extend the inspiration of university teach- 
ing to those who cannot attend the university. Some 
extension teaching is conducted by means of public 
lectures ; some by means of reading courses ; some 
by means of personal visitations. There is extension 
teaching in the arts, in literature, in the sciences, and 
there is extension teaching in agriculture. Of all 
people the farmer is the hardest to reach in extension 
teaching. This is not because he is less eager to 
learn than other people, but because he is conserva- 
tive. The nature of his work and the comparative 
isolation of his life tend to make him tenacious of 
established ideas and slow to accept Innovations. 
Farmers are the great conservative element in our 
body politic. So it was only natural that the early 
efforts in the extension of agricultural education were 
viewed with suspicion by many farmers and with 
derision by others. But all of this is passing away ; 
we hear less and less about ' ' book-farming." ' ' Sci- 
entific farming " and " practical farming " are merg- 
ing so rapidly that they will soon be synonymous 

terms. 

Extension teaching in agriculture is of far greater 
importance than extenson teaching in any other sub- 
ject, not only because agriculture engages the atten- 
tion of so many more people than any other industry, 
but also because such a relatively small number of 



I 






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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



43 









farmers are so situated that they can attend agricul- 
tural training schools or colleges. The attendance at 
most of our agricultural colleges is rapidly increasing, 
and one does not need to be unduly optimistic in 
order to predict that before the end ot this century 
the agricultural course will be as largely patronized as 
any other course in the curriculum ; but even then, 
most farmers will never see the inside of college 
walls. They must be reached by extension teaching. 
As children they should be interested in the natural 
world around them ; in birds, flowers, stones and the 
majestic procession of the seasons, so that they may 
learn to love country life and the environment in which 
they are placed. This effort has been called nature- 
study. As lads, they should be shown something of 
the wonderful alchemy of the soil, how plants eat and 
drink ; how the farmer prospers only when he questions 
the soil and studies the plant. This type of effort Is 
being Introduced as » Elementary Agriculture In the 
Public Schools." As men. they should be brought 
into touch with the vital problems of their profession, 
for farming may be made a profession, by means of 
farmers' Institutes and farmers' reading-courses. 

The movement called extension teaching in agri- 
culture, therefore. Is best Interpreted from the point of 
view of altruism. It is but one feature of a general 
tendency in modern education. It has the ring of 
earnestness and unselfishness. The men who have been 
identified with it have put their heart into the work, 
and In most cases, have not expected or received 
any' recompense except the joy of service. The 
whole extension movement is bound to grow, because 
it la the expression of a truth which must some time 
possess the world— a truth to which a wise man once 
gave concrete form in the words. "We that are 
strong ought to bear the Infirmities of the weak." 



John M. Merriam. Esq. Response for the Board of 
Agriculture by First Vice-President William R. 

Sessions. 

10-30 a. m.— Lecture : •• Producing and Marketing 
of Milk." by Frank B. Allen. Treasurer Springfield 
Co-operative Milk Association. Springfield. 

2 P . m.— Lecture : - The Profitable Dairy Cow." 
by Prof. Charles S. Plumb. Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. Ohio State University. Columbus. Ohio. 

7-45 p. m.— Lecture: " Methods and Procedure in . 
the National House of Congress," by Hon. John D. 
Long. Hingham. 

Wednesday, Dec. 7. 
10-30 a. m.— Lecture: "The Advisability of Agri- 
cultural Education In Elementary Schools." by Prof. 
L. H. Bailey, Director College of Agriculture, Cor- 
nell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

2 P . m.— Lecture: "The Present Definitions of Fer- 
tility." by Dr. W. H. Jordan, Director New York 
Agricultural Experiment Station, N. Y. 

8-15 p. m.— Reception to the Board of Agriculture 
and others attending the meeting. His Excellency 
John L. Bates will extend the greetings of the 
Commonwealth. 

Thursday, Dec. 8. 
10 a.m.— Lecture : "Food Adulterations." by Dr.H. 
W. Wiley. Chief Bureau of Chemistry, United States 
Department of Agriculture. Washington. D. C 

1-30 p. m.— Leave Hotel Kendall to visit farm of 
N. I. Bowditch. Framlngham, on Invitation extended 
the Board and others attending the meeting. 



College N <>**$■ 



MEETING OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
AGRICULTURE. 

The public winter meeting of the State Board of 
Agriculture will be held at the Opera House. South 
Framlngham, Dec. 6. 7. and 8. The following pro- 
gram has been arranged : 

Tuesday, Dec. 6. 

10 a m.— Meeting opened with prayer by Rev. 
Charles H. Daniels, D.D. Address of welcome by 



—The next Issue of the Signal is to be the annual 
football number. 

—The drill and gallery practice will be confined to 
the drill hall from now until spring. 

Caldwell, '08. who was sent home with a broken 

collar-bone, has returned to college. 

—The Senior class is now taking up laboratory 
work in Bacteriology under Dr. Paige. 

G. N. Willis was taken down with an attack of 

diphtheria last week and immediately went to Pratt 
hospital. 



— Fullam, '08. from Brookfield and Damon, 08. 
from Belchertown have both left college. 

— L. S. Walker and C. F. Allen attended the Y. 
M. C. A. convention held in Worcester recently. 

— Sec. William M. Olin was the guest of Maj. 
Anderson at the college, during the week of Nov. 14. 

— The Experiment Station has purchased a new 
centrifugal machine to be used in making physical 
analyses of soils. 

— The M. A. C. Alumni club of New York will 
hold its annual dinner at the St. Denis hotel, New 
York. Friday evening Dec. 9th. 

— The football game, scheduled with Fordham 
university, to be played at Springfield on Thanksgiving 
day, was cancelled by Fordham. 

— The second of a series of dancing parties, given 
by Mr. and Mrs. A. X. Petit and their dancing class, 
will be held in Red Mens hall tonight. 

— Quite a number of students and some of the 
alumni attended the game against Tufts on the 
Friday before the Harvard-Yale game. 

— L. S. Walker, president of the Y. M. C. A., 
spoke at a meeting of the Epworth league held at the 
Methodist church on Sunday evening, Nov. 6. 

— Holcomb, 1905. attended the annual Initiation 
and banquet of the Alpha Lambda chapter of Kappa 
Sigma at the University of Vermont, Nov. 15th. 

— The trees in the college wood-lot have become 
so thick that a thinning out is now being done. Many 
magnificent specimens of the chestnut tree are being 
cut. 

— Scott, '06. and Engstrom, '07, represented the 
local chapter of Kappa Sigma at the Initiation and 
banquet of Beta Kappa chapter of the New Hamp- 
shire State college. 

— The Tufts game coming Friday instead of Sat- 
urday afforded both the team and rooters the oppor- 
tunity of witnessing the interesting contest between 
Dartmouth and Brown. 

— A bulletin, containing the names of speakers 
available to speak before farmers' institutes in this 
state, has recently been published by the State Board 
of Agriculture. The bulletin contains, besides the 
names of the speakers, the subjects on which they 
are prepared to speak. M. A. C.'s alumni and faculty 
are very conspicuous in this list. 



— The second informal dance will be held in the 
drill hall on Saturday afternoon and evening. Dec 3. 
Music will be rendered by the Academy of Music 
orchestra. This Is to be the last dance in the drill 
hall previous to the Christmas vacation, and a large 
attendance is anticipated. It is the intention of the 
committee to have a series of these dances during 
the winter and spring months, and to do this the 
support of all is needed. 



SOIL INOCULATION. 

" Inoculating the Ground," is the subject treated 
upon by Gilbert H. Grosvenor in Harpers' Monthly for 
October. It is a very Interesting article and shows 
that the department of agriculture is making vast 
strides in its work in plant physiology. For years it 
has been known that vetch and such crops produce 
nodules on their roots. These have been found to be 
composed of bacteria and are termed " nitrogen fix- 
ing bacteria." Untiring efforts have been made to 
isolate these minute organisms and grow them in 
media in the laboratory. This has been accomplished 
and Dr. George T. Moore, head of the Laboratory of 
Plant Physiology at Vashington found that he could 
not only grow these organisms but could make them 
permanent. His bacteria grown upon nitrogen free 
media w.ll retain their high activity for a long time if 
carefully dried out and revived in a liquid medium." 
From this showing Dr. Moore found that cotton is the 
economic material to distribute these organisms. 
Millions of them will adhere to the cotton which is 
subsequently dried thoroughly and shipped to any por- 
tion of the universe. Seeds for inoculation are soaked 
in this nitrogen fixing bacterial solution. The soil is 
Inoculated by spreading a mixture of earth containing 
these organisms lightly over the surface of the fields 
and then plowing In. Three packages are sent out 
by the government on request and remittance of 
actual cost which Is about four cents. Package num- 
bers one and three contain media or food for the far- 
mer to multiply the germs by. Package number two 
contains the dry cotton with the millions of dried bac- 
teria in it. All can be carried in a man's vest pocket 
and is sufficient, when chemicals in packages one and 
three are in solution and number two soaked in It. to 
inoculate from three to four acres of barren land. 
Directions are enclosed with every package. Thus the 



i 




44 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



farmer receiving it. can mix up the solution even 
though he has not spent years in the chemical labo- 
ratory. Experiments have been made in different 
sections of the country and results have been grati- 
fying. The author's article is well illustrated and 
also contains figures which are startling. The gov- 
ernment sends out different cultures for different 
crops. If this scientific discovery continues to meet 
with the success it has attained in this, its infancy, 
woe be unto the fertilizer manufacturers when it 
reaches its full development. Too much praise can- 
not be given Dr. Mocre for the manner in which he 
turned his patent over to the government rather than 
make an individual fortune. 



A FIRE SCENE. 

Clang, clang, the deep ringing tones of the fire bell 
are heard in the dead of night ; half dressed and sleepy 
people rush to doors and windows to see where the 
fire is. A dull red lurid glare fills the sky to the 
south, and those who know the city turn pale and 
exclaim. " My God. its Sullivan's Flats!" 

" Sullivan's Flats " is the name given to a whole 
row of old wooden tenement houses in the southern 
part of the city, and which were so unsafe that com- 
panies refused to insure them for any amount. 

A few moments after the alarm has been given 
people are seen hurrying toward the scene of the con- 
flagration. Great clouds of smoke roll upward 
through the thin air. In front of the building In 
which the fire is, three great engines are puffing away, 
vomiting forth smoke and fire, and at every stroke of 
the piston sending a resistless stream of water into 
thp blazing building. The fire chief shouts his orders, 
and then asks if all are out of the house. No one 
seems to know. 

At this instant a man and a woman are seen in 
different windows of the house. The firemen shout 
to them to wait, the woman seems to hear, but the 
man, crazed by the fire, pays no attention to the shouts 
of the people. He jumps to the window-sill and stands 
there, gesticulating wildly. Then he sees a narrow 
ledge of projecting brick, going around the building 
on a level with it. At the top of the window is another 
similar ledge, and in spite of the warning shouts, he 
grasps the top ledge and stepping on the lower one, 
tries to go around the building that way. caring for 



nothing but to get away from the fire. 

The people, horror-stricken stand speechless as 
slowly, oh, so slowly he makes his way along the wall. 
He takes another step and a shower of mortar and 
brick falls to the flagstones sixty-five feet below ; he 
slips, recovers himself, then his hand loses its hold, 
and with a heart-rending yell he topples over and falls. 
Twenty feet below he strikes some telegraph wires, 
these hold him for an instant, and then he drops 
another fifteen feet onto a trolley post, hangs across 
the arm a moment moaning piteously, then plunges 
down the remaining thirty feet and strikes the sidwalk 
with a sickening thud, moves his limbs convulsively 
and then all is over — he is dead. A doctor who is on 
the spot hurries forward, and, lifting the man's head 
so as to help carry him away, shudders as he grasps 
it. for through a great hole In the back of his head 
blood and gray matter are slowly exuding. They 
cover him with a sheet and carry him off in an 
ambulance. 

The woman, meanwhile, has been rescued by the 
firemen and sits, half fainting, among the other 
inmates of the block, watching the destruction of her 
home. 

The fire, in spite of the efforts of the fire men is 
spreading, and though streams of water are poured in 
from every quarter, it spreads rapidly. The flames 
mount higher and higher, the firemen give up all hopes 
of saving the structure and turn the water upon the 
adjacent buildings to save them if possible. All 
seems in vain, however. 

Suddenly a man rushes forward, his eyes starting 
from his head in terror ; catching the fire-chief by 
the arm he yells, " There is fifty pounds of gunpowder 
in that building," pointing to a shed In the rear 
" Heaven help us if it reaches that." At these 
words the chief shouts to his men and they turn and 
run a line of hose around to the shed. 

Blazing embers are falling all around the place, and 
in one place the roof is on fire A well directed 
stream puts it out in that place, but the heat is so 
intense that the firemen cannot get near enough to 
soak the building. Then the chief signals to the 
engineers to put on more pressure. They do so, and 
for an instant it seems as if they were gaining on the 
flames, then, suddenly without an instants warning, 
the hose bursts, drenching the people around. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Nothing can save the building now ; the police hurry 
here and there dispersing the crowd ; the horsemen 
and truckmen reel in their hose with feverish haste ; 
the engines are driven off. the hose carts following' 
Soon there is nothing to be seen but the burning 
building and pieces of broken hose lying around. 

Then a tremendous roar is heard, and a cloud of 
debris rises In the air, and everything is obscured by 
the smoke and falling boards, earth, and rocks, which 
follow. The gunpowder has blown a whole side of 
the building out. and the rest collapses, making a hot 
bed of ruins. Now the engines return ; the hose-carts 
gallop up ; the men quickly lay new lines of hose and 
strive to put out the fire which glows fiercely in the 
ruins. After four long hours they succeed in putting 
out the last spark, and. tired but triumphant, they and 
the spectators return to their homes. 

The terror is passed, and the rest of the •• Flats " 
are safe, but at what a cost ! Thousands of dollars 
worth of property burned and destroyed, and one 
man killed in a horrible manner, by leaping sheer 
sixty-five feet, when crazed by fire. 

___ c. 



45 



Dfp&rtm?rvir flot*s. 



HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

State Forester Ackerman has arranged with the 
trustees of the college to obtain land for raising 
125.000 seedlings. The seedlings will consist of 
chestnut, ash. beech and sugar maple. Mr. Acker- 
mar, says that the first crop will be ready some time 
next year, but most of them will require two or three 
years for proper development. When these are ready 
they will be distributed around the state wherever they 
are wanted. Experiments on the barren wastes of 
Cape Cod will also be undertaken by the Forester. 

The seniors in Floriculture are at present interested 
in the subject of ■< Mushroom Growing," and will 
obtain some practical experience in this line during 
the winter. 

HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 

The public seminars in horticulture and landscape 

gardening will be continued from time to time this 

winter. An earlier lecture would have been held 

but the speeches could not come at the date arranged. 



A definite appointment can now be announced for 
Dec. 9. when John Davey of Ohio will speak on the 
care of shade trees. Mr. Davey is the author of a 
new and very popular book called - The Tree Doctor " 
His lecture will be illustrated with stereopticon slides 
and .s spoken of by those who have heard it as some- 
thing unusually good. Mr. Davey is making a lecture 
tour in the New England states under general arrange- 
ments with G. S. Parker of Hartford. It is probable 
that J. H. Hale, the peach man. will be the next 
speaker. 

Mr. Canning has secured from the Arnold Arbore 
turn a fine collection of specimens of ornamental 
shrubs in fruit for the landscape gardening classes 
Professor Waugh has managed the customary 
exchanges of apples for the use of the pomology 
classes. These classes find it a very useful experience 
to examine, describe and judge fruits from Michigan 
Kansas and other foreign parts. 

George O. Greene lectured last week in Keene 
N. H.. before the annual meeting of the New Hamp- 
shire Horticultural society. 

The Library of Congress, in co-operation with the 
American Library association and under the editor- 
ship of Melvil Dewey, has just issued an elaborate 
library catalog for use in small public libraries It 
contains an index to 8.000 recommended volumes of 
all kinds. Two members of the M. A. C faculty 
Professors Brooks and Waugh. are among the 
authors included. 



Alumni. 



74.— E. H. Libby is president of the Lewiston. 
Clarkston company, which controls a territory nearly 
25.000 miles in extent, situated In Washington Ore- 
gon, Idaho, and Nevada. Bowker. 7 1 . and Wheeler 
71. are Interested in the company. 
'80.— C. M. McQueen, St. Louis. Mo. 
•82.— Herbert Myrick has recently had published 
a book entitled. - A swim for Life.', This relates the 
author's personal experience off Marblehead. 

'84.— E. A. Jones, formerly superintendent of the 
college farm, has accepted a position as manager 
of the country estate of L. H. Lapham. New 
Canaan, Conn. 



4 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•87.— Edward R. Flint is college physician and pro- 
fessor of chemistry at Lake City, Fla. 

'94._Dr. Claude F. Walker's marriage to Miss 
Harrlette S. Ward of New Haven, Conn., was 
recently celebrated. 

'94.— John E. Glfford's marriage to Miss Luella 
M. Dudley of Sutton was recently celebrated. 

02.— H. E. Hodgkiss is at present assistant ento- 
mologist at the New York agricultural experiment 
station. Geneva, N. Y. 

•02.— C Milton Kinney. General Delivery. Los 
Angeles, Cal. 



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Students at Columbia were employed during the 
summer in 85 different pursuits. 

The attendance of 3.300 students at Cornell this 
year is the largest in its history. 



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47 



Tufts is soon to observe the semi-centennial anni- 
versary of the founding of the college. 

The medical school of the University of Vermont 
has received the addition of a new building. 

A theatre with a seating capacity of 900 is to be 
erected on the campus of the University of Michigan. 

The thirty-five American scholars holding the 
Rhodes scholarships have begun their studies at 
Oxford. 

"Bill Reid." Harvard '01. seems to be the one 
particular bright star In the football zenith at 
Cambridge. 

The new athletic field at Brookline. of the Mass. 
Institute of Technology, is said to be one of the finest 
in the country. 

A dozen automobiles were furnished to Colum- 
bia students who supported Parker, in which to 
stump New York. 

A weekly democratic paper dealing with the state 
and national campaign is published by the democrats 
of the University of Michigan. 

Columbia college has been presented with $150,000 
for the School of Mines, by Adolph Lewishon, presi- 
dent of the United Metal Selling Co. 

Owing to a lack of accommodations over 200 were 
turned away from Dartmouth ; as it is there Is an 
enrollment of 860. with 360 freshmen. 

The Amherst German club with about fifty mem- 
bers was organized two weeks ago at Amherst college. 
They are to have rooms in one of the dormitories. 

Brown Is considering ways and means to retire pro- 
fessors who are over seventy years of age or who have 
been connected with the university for twenty years. 
There is a deficit of over $42,000 in the running 
expenses the past year at Yale. The small college 
seems to be the most successful In living within its 
income. 

A mine has been leased in Colorado to be worked 
during the summer entirely by the mining students 
from Harvard, Yale. Institute of Technology and the 
Colorado School of Mining. 

Harvard's attitude in regard to Matthews, the colored 
end and star ball player, shows that with her recog- 
nized social tendencies, she Is rubbing elbows with 
Dartmouth democratically. 



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48 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Another interesting feature of the Army-Navy 
game at Philadelphia was the presence of Captain 
Hurley of Harvard on one end of the measuring line 
and Captain Hogan of Yale on the other. 

The anti-fraternity rule in force at Iowa State col- 
lege has been abolished by the faculty. The ruling, 
the college authorities claim, was made because of a 
misunderstanding of the aims of the college fraternity. 

Now that the supremacy of the leading western 
colleges in football is placed, another rivalry has 
sprung up along an entirely different line. Minnesota, 
Nebraska. Wisconsin, Iowa. Ohio and Purdue are 
contesting for honors at the Live Stock exposition at 
Chicago from Nov. 26 to Dec. 2. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters an d Tailors. 

The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Guyer Hats and A. B. Klrsch- 

baurn A Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN ahd H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON A THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



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FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



O. H. KKNDRICK, PmormiMTOm. 



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NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. DECEMBER 14, 



1904 



NO. 



^ , I* PubHshed For,ni « htly *y Studen,s of »h^^*^*^^ 

notify the Business Manager. *"* Subscribers "ho do not receive their piper regularly ere requested to 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Editor-in-Chief 
GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. Business Manager. 

ALLEN NEWMAN SWAIN ,905^^" **" = PEAKES ' "° 6 - A —» « *"— •*«»«" 

PERCY FREDERIC WILL.AMS. '. 905. Department Note,. GEORGE^* v ^ZL ! ^ ,ntercolte ^- 
ALBERT DAVIS TAYLOR. 1 905, College N«es. ARTH UR w m I£u£? *"' ' 9 ° 6 ' A ' Umn ' No,M 
ARTHUR ALPHONSE RACICOT Ik 1906 ARTHUR WILLIAM HICCINS, 1907. 
° ' J "- * 906 - EE >W!N DANIELS PHILBRICK. .907. Athletic. 

T * r,B " >l0 ° "* r BW ^"i*» ^ 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 

College Senate, 

Reading- Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. S. Walker. Pres. Athletic Association, 

E. W. Newhail, Jr., Manager. Base- Ball Association 

W. A. Munson. Pre*. Nineteen Hundred and Six Index 

H. F. Thompson, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manager. 

F. H, Kennedy, Manager, 

G. W. Patch, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Pott Office at Amherat, 



Editorials. 



The Autocrat, who has been writing for the Signal 
since last spring Is leaving college and consequently 
will discontinue his work. His work was made to 
cover many points which require particular treatment 
and it is hoped that it will be taken up by some mem- 
ber of the board or from the senior or junior class. 



It might be fitting at this time to say a few words 
upon the condition in which we find the dressing room 
at the drill hall. At the beginning of the basketball 
season the baths were put In proper working order. 
Today as a result of rough usage and mistreatment 
none of them are in a respectable condition. Whether 
this is the doings of students In college, or of those 
outside, privileged to use the hall we know not ; but 
these things are not there for abuse and such a condi- 
tion of affairs ought not to exist. It should be the 
duty of the students in the interests of the basketball 
association to do their part, and if the fault is found to 



be with outsiders, then the use of such things will be 
prohibited them. The management cannot sincerely 
ask the college authorities for lockers and repairs If 
what they have already given us cannot be properly 
used. The season has started with plenty of spirit 
and enthusiasm ; let it continue and go into history 
as a record to be proud of. With but one week 
before the vacation and games immediately after, there 
Is much to be done to round a team Into shape, and 
strong scrubs are the main factor in obtaining such 
an end. 



That there is a fitness to all things, we are forcibly 
reminded by the action recently taken by the college 
senate in regard to the wearing of sweaters or shirt 
waists, without coats, to chapel ; and also in regard to 
certain classes celebrating special days by appearing 
In outlandish or horrible costumes. That sveaters 
and shirt waists do. indeed, have their merits of use- 
fulness and comfort cannot be denied ; but it is equally 
evident that their pleasing effect Is limited by time 



50 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



and occasion. In some colleges it is a hard and fast 
rule that sweaters shall not appear in any class-room ; 
while at other institutions the sweater seems to be the 
distinguishing mark of a college man. and here it is 
made to serve for nearly alt occasions. It does not 
seem necessary for us here at M. A. C. to adopt any 
college laws on the matter of wearing apparel ; but 
we should suggest that every man use proper judg- 
ment, even in his dress. Clothes do not make the 
man, it is true, but they do go far towards making 
first Impressions, and first impressions last the longest. 



to obtain a copy of it. it has been republished this 
year and just presented to the public. The second 
book is one which is of great interest to us all, as it 
was written by one of our alumni, Herbert Myrick of 
the class of 1882 and now the editor of the New Eng- 
land Homestead, published in Springfield. The work 
is entitled " A Swim for Life," and contains the per- 
sonal account of the author's thrilling experience in 
the water off Marblehead, during a squall in the sum- 
mer of 1895. 



After our success in football this year the thought 
that is now foremost is for the team next year. Just 
at present the outlook is by no means rosy. This years 
graduating class carries out nine men from the varsity 
squad, seven of whom were fixtures in their positions. 
This means that the team must be wholly reorganized 
next fall, and men with weight and experience will be 
in demand. It has been decided to hold a spring 
practice for the purpose of training the raw material 
in college in the game, At that time every man with 
a love for football ought to come out. It is particu- 
larly desired that the big men take up the practice. 
There may be some "finds" In the men we least sus- 
pect of having gridiron ability. Meanwhile we ought 
to be on the alert to get some good men to enter with 
next year's class. Try to get all such men interested 
in the college. It may mean a great deal to M. A. C. 



Among the latest additions to the college library 
are two books of especial interest. One is entitled 
- : e'ters from an American Farmer." by J. Hector 
S John Crevecoeur and published in 1782. It con- 
tains an account of the wanderings of this French- 
man who came to this country and became a natural- 
ized citizen of New York In 1764. Among other 
places described are Martha's Vineyard and Nan- 
tucket. Also Negro Slavery is treated, together with 
subjects of a widely separated character. There is 
one thing which marks this work from others of that 
date, and that is that, in addition to the information 
contained in it, it is looked upon primarily as a piece 
of literature. In fact, it is so looked up to. that it is 
in reality a classic, and for this reason, it being hard 



This year the college is asking from the state legis- 
lature appropriations for a new Horticultural Hall, for 
an addition to the Insectary. and for an addition to the 
East Experiment Station. There are strong grounds 
to expect that these petitions will be granted. How- 
ever these are not the only new buildings the college 
needs ; but as our legislature seems to consider a pal- 
try few thousands as an exceedingly generous sum for 
its agricultural college, it appears likely that we shall 
not be able to get more. Some of the other buildings 
which we greatly need and which we must have for 
the proper progress of the college are a new library, 
an Agricultural Hall.containing a museum and labora- 
tories, and a new Chemical and Physical laboratory. 
Of course there are many other buildings that would 
be useful, but these mentioned are even now almost 
necessary. President Goodell long ago set himself to 
the building up of the college, and he has succeeded 
wonderfully. The ground-work for a great institution 
has been carefully laid ; but most of the work of con- 
struction still remains to be done. It is agreed that 
the management of the college is in competent hands. 
Only money Is lacking. It was but a year ago that 
the state appropriated two million dollars for M. I. T. 
Is training in agriculture and the allied sciences less 
important than a knowledge of engineering ? There 
are indications that Massachusetts people think so ; 
but it cannot be otherwise than that our state 
will yet see her mistake. Not long ago our present 
freshman class was pleasantly informed that their 
number was too large to be accommodated by the 
college, and that a thinning out process would soon 
begin. It seems hard ; but what can be done by 
those have no power to get at the source of the 
matter? 



Athletic tioU*. 

REVIEW OF THE SEASON. 

The past football season has been without doubt the 
most successful in the history of the college. Indeed 
Captain Munson and his team have earned our con- 
gratulations and the gratitude of every loyal son of 
Massachusetts. When one considers that from a 
college of less than two hundred men. a team can 
come forth and defeat five larger institutions, play a 
tie game with another and hold the two best teams 
in New England outside of Harvard and Yale to a 
creditable score, it speaks well for our spirit. 

For this success a large share of the praise is due 
to our coach, Matthew W. Bullock the former Dart- 
mouth star. A student of football and a fine condi- 
tioner of men, he put his heart and soul into his task 
and throughout the season had the team " coming." 

The first game of the season was played with Holy 
Cross after but a few days practice. Inasmuch as 
they had been practicing for two weeks, our team did 
exceedingly well to hold them to a 0-0 score. Dart- 
mouth came three days later ; and while our team was 
unable to stop their heavy opponents, it maintained 
the reputation which has characterized our teams for 
playing gritty football. Williams followed three days 
later and for the first time in the history of our col- 
college our team scored a decisive victory by scoring 
12 points to Williams by straight football. Then 
came the Brown game three days later which was In 
many ways the disappointment of the season. Our team 
was rather lame from their hard schedule and this 
together with the fact that the jaunt to Providence 
was exceedingly tedious, seemed to take the spirit 
away from the eleven, and throughout the game our 
play was characterized by listiessness. After a rest 
of a few days the team started on a series of victories, 
Wesleyan, Springfield Training School, Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute and Tufts each giving way to the 
prowess of Massachusetts. 

That the annual game with Amherst was called off 
was a source of disappointment to our students ; but 
this affair has been explained in a previous issue. 

In regard to our prospects for next year we can 
truthfully say that they are most excellent. To be 
sure, we lose many of this year's team, but with the 



right spirit there is little doubt but what a team that 
will uphold our present high standard of football can 
be turned out in the season of 1905. 

SCORES FOR THE SEASON. 

Sept. 28— Massachusetts 0. Holy Cross 0. 

Oct. I — Massachusetts 0, Dartmouth 17. 

Oct. 4 — Massachusetts 12, Williams 0. 

Oct. 8 — Massachusetts 0, Brown 27. 

Oct. 15 — Massachusetts 24, Wesleyan 6. 

Oct. 22— Massachusetts 1 1, Springfeld T. S. 0. 

Nov. 5 — Massachusetts 39, Worcester P. I. 0. 

Nov. 18 — Massachusetts 1 1, Tufts 0. 

Games won 5. Games lost 2. Tie game 1. 
Points scored by Massachusetts 97. Points scored 
by opponents 50. 

THE TEAM. 

Capt. Willard A. Munson, '05. came to us from 
Aurora. III., where he captained his high school 
eleven. He has played fullback for four years and 
has the reputation of being one of the best fullbacks 
in the minor colleges. He is 22 years old, weighs 175 
pounds and is 5 ft. 11 in. in height. 

John J. Gardner, '05. of Milford, left tackle, 22 
years old, weight 185 pounds, height 5 ft. II in. 

G. Willard Patch. '05. of Arlington Heights, centre, 
prepared at Somerville high school where he played 
2 years. He is 23 years old, weighs 160 pounds, and 
is 5 ft. 6 in. in height. 

Bertram Tupper, '05, of Truro. N. S., held down 
right end in a very creditable manner. He Is 24 
years old. is 5 ft. 8 In. in height and weighs 150 
pounds. 

Chester L. Whitaker. '05. of Somerville played two 
years on his local high school team before coming to 
Massachusetts. He has played right halfback every 
year since entering college. He Is 22 years old. 
weighs 155 pounds and is 5 ft. 10 in. In height. 

Clarence W. Lewis, '05, prepared at Melrose high 
school, where he played fullback for three years. 
Since entering college he has played left halfback, is 
23 years old. weight 175 younds. height 5 ft. 10 in. 

G. Howard Allen, '05, of Somerville, end. age 22. 
weight 140 pounds, height 5 ft. 7 in. 

Edward T. Ladd. '05. right guard, comes from 
Winchester, age 20. height 6 ft., weight 175 pounds. 

C. Sheldon Holcomb. '05. of Tariffville, Conn., 



i 



■ 



5* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



guard, is 21 years old, weight 155 pounds, height 5 ft. 

8 in, 

William H. Craighead, '06 (capt. '05), of Boston, 
left tackle, age 27, weight 190 pounds, height 5 ft. 
1 1 in. 

J. Edward Martin. '06, of Brockton, left end. 21 
years old, weight 150 pounds, height 5 ft. 10 in. 
Before coming to college he played three years on 
the Brockton high school team. 

Daniel W. Carey. '06. of Rockland, left guard, is 
20 years old, weighs 158 pounds, and is 5 ft. 7 in. in 

height. 

William O. Taft, '06, left halfback, prepared at 
Pepperell high school. He is 21 years old, weighs 
150 pounds, and is 5 ft. 9 in. in height. 

Fred A. Cutter, '07, of Pelham, N H., centre, 
prepared at Lowell High school, where he played 
three years. He is 22 years old. and weighs 160 
pounds.and is 5 ft. 8 in. in height. 

Fred C. Peters, '07. of Lennox, halfback, played 
two years at Cushing academy before coming to col- 
lege. He is 20 years old, weighs 145 pounds, and is 
5 ft. 9 in. in height. 

Edwin D. Philbrick, '07, of Somerville. fullback. 
Played two years at Somerville High school, is 20 
years of age. weighs 165 pounds, and is 5 ft. 10 in. in 
height. 

George Cobb, '08, of Amherst. He learned the 
game at the local high school and has played a fine 
game at quarterback this past season. He is 19 
years old, weighs 150 pounds and is 5 ft. 8 in. in 
height. 

Average weight of team 161 pounds. 

Average weight of line 162 pounds. 

Average weight of backs 159 pounds. 

Average age of team 22 years. 

Average height of team 5 ft. 9 in. 

FOOTBALL ELECTION. 

Dec. 1 the football team elected William H.Craig 
head, '06, of Boston, captain ; and Ralph W. Peakes 
of Newtonville manager for the season of 1905. 

William Hunlie Craighead was born at South Hill. 
Va., 27 years ago. He prepared for college at the 
Howard University Preparatory school. Washington. 
D. C While here he played football two years. 
Since " Bill " came to Massachusetts he has played 



a strong game, playing guard two years and tackle one. 

Ralph Ware Peaks, '06, manager, comes from 
Newtonville. Since entering college he has been 
prominently connected with many college affairs. 

After the Tufts game Captain Munson presented 
Coach Bullock, on behalf of the team with a hand- 
some watch-fob and charm. The charm consisted 
of the college seal, on the back of which was a suit- 
able inscription. 

MADE ENVIABLE RECORD. 

The Boston Globe says " The hard, consistent work 
of the Massachusetts agricultural college in football 
this season, as well as past seasons, places her in the 
same class as Williams, Wesleyan and Amherst. 
The record of this eleven this fall was five games 
won and two lost, the invincible Dartmouth eleven 
winning one of the games. In 1902 M. A. C.held 
Dartmouth down to a tie. 



BASKET BALL. 

The excitement of football had hardly left the 
campus when all eyes were turned to the Drill Hall 
watching the various candidates for the basketball 
team. This is a sport that needs a little more 
encouragement. In past years the teams from this 
college have been handicapped by lack of interest 
and the earnest support of the student body. This 
year we expect to see a change, and the sport should 
certainly flourish. Every position is open and the 
best men will certainly receive the positions. Right 
here is a golden opportunity for both Freshmen and 
Sophomores. Do not be discouraged if you do not 
make the college team, come out on the scrub. The 
men who take advantage of the opportunities to 
receive experience at the regular team's expense are 
by no means losers. This point was well illustrated 
this fall on the football field. It shows the right 
spirit and the right spirit is what makes a college. 
Let us co-operate one and all to give the team our 
strongest support in carrying through a successful 
season. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



53 



HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 

John Davy of Kent. O.. the author of " The Tree 
Doctor" lectured before the Horticultural Seminar In 
the chapel last Friday evening. There was quite a 



large audience and all were appreciative of the good 
work Mr. Davy set forth. His lantern slides illus- 
trated his work very clearly and gave every one a 
definite idea as to just what his methods of the doc- 
toring are. The lecturer gave an introductory speech 
which set forth some startling facts in regard to the 
forest conditions of foretgn countries and the United 
States. He urged the audience that they should 
come to the tescue in this, the critical period of forest 
conditions in our native land, that an attempt be made 
to have forestry taught in the public schools, and that 
lessons in practical reforestration start there. Mr. 
Davy received hearty applause when he made the 
statement that the town of Amherst showed trees in 
a better condition than in any town he had visited 
Street, park and cemetery plantings were among some 
of the features he brought out. 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

The second informal dance of the year was held 
in the drill hall on Saturday, Dec. 3 ; and with ideal 
weather for dancing it may well be called the most 
successful dance of its kind ever held at the college. 
Few alumni were present, and the number of students 
attending well demonstrated the fact that there are 
men galore in college who can turn out to make these 
dances a success. The hall was elaborately decorated 
with bunting and a fine display of plants from the 
greenhouses. A generous distribution of college 
banners around the walls added much to the life or 
the decorations. The Academy of Music orchestra 
rendered an excellent program; and Brown of Amherst 
did the catering. 

At the next Informal which is to be held about the 
middle of January, and being the only one previous to 
the " Prom." the committee expect an attendance 
even greater than at this one. The patronesses were 
Mrs. G. E. Stone, Mrs. J. E. Ostrander, and Mrs. 
Forestall, Amherst; Mrs. Orcutt, Smith; Miss Mun- 
roe, Mt. Holyoke. Those dancing were, L. R. Her- 
rick and Miss French, Amherst ; Mr. and Mrs. Has- 
kins. Amherst ; Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Smith. Amherst; 
R. W. Morse and Miss Wallace, Mt. Holyoke ; E. G. 
Proulx and Miss Bessie Harrington, Ware; W. V. 
Tower and Miss Harrington, Ware ; Mr. Kibby and 
Miss Thayer. Amherst ; G. H. Allen and Miss Bar- 
ker. Smith; H. D. Crosby and Miss Goodnow, Am- 



herst; J. F. Lyman and Miss Jenks. Smith ; E. W. 
Newhall. Jr. and Miss. Peers. Smith ; W. M. Sears 
and Miss Taylor, Ludlow; A. N. Swain and Miss 
Lee, Mt. Holyoke ; A. D. Taylor ; L. S. Walker and 
Miss Bates, Pelham ; C L. Whitaker and Miss 
Dodge, Smith; P. F. Williams and Miss Robinson, 
Smith; F. L. Yeaw and Miss Quimby. Mt. Holyoke; 
W. W. Colton and Miss Farnsworth. Holyoke; A. D. 
Farrar and Miss Cobb. Amherst; E. F. Gaskell and 
Miss Jones, Springfield; E. P. Mudge and Miss 
Reynolds. Smith; F. C. Pray and Miss Hall, Am- 
herst ; H. M. Russell and Miss Warner, Northamp- 
ton; H. A. Suhlke and Miss Carlton, Mt. Holyoke ; C. 
H. Chadwick and Miss Livers. Boston ; M. H. Clark 
and Miss Austin, Smith ; J. G. Curtis and Miss King, 
Mt. Holyoke ; J. H. Walker and Miss Eaton. Spring- 
field ; C. B. Bates and Miss McKillip, Burlington, 
Vt.; H. M. Browne and Miss French, Smith ; G. R. 
Cobb and Miss Bartlett. Amherst ; T. L. Warner and 
Miss Farrar, Amherst ; C. L. Shaw and Miss Battles. 
Smith ; C. S. Holcomb and Miss Irwin. Smith ; H. 
T. Pierce and Miss Hawley. Amherst ; W. D. Bar- 
low and Miss Tanner, Smith ; F. C. Peters and Miss 
Converse, Springfield ; C. L. Flint and Miss Haskell, 
Mt. Holyoke ; K. E. Gillett and Miss May. Smith ; 
Mr. French, Amherst. 




— C. L. Shaw, ex-'07, passed a few days at college 
recently. 

— Many enjoyed the skating upon the pond before 
the light snow came. 

— All are anxiously looking forward to the announce- 
ment of the date of the Junior Prom. 

— The first basketball game will be played tonight 
with Holyoke Consolidated in the drill hall. 

— A number of students attended the skating car- 
nival held at Mt. Holyoke last Saturday evening. 

— At the annual football election W. H. Craighead 
was elected captain and R. W. Peakes was elected 
manager for next year. 

— On Nov. 29 Professor Tyler of Amherst college 
gave a lecture before the zoological seminar upon 
the •• Survival of the Fittest. " 



54 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



—On Dec. 2 President Goodell attended a banquet 
given at the Algonquin club in Boston by Governor 
Bates to his Royal Highness Prince Fushimi. 

— E. A. Jones, formerly superintendent of the farm 
department has received an appointment as manager 
of a large country estate at New Canaan. Conn. 

— R. P. Gay, ex-'04. who for the past year has 
been in the employ of the exposition company at 
St. Louis returned to college last week to finish his 
course. 

—A. V. Osmun is at the Delaware Experiment 
station for a few days studying soil bacteria under 
Prof. Chester, who has investigated the subject 
thoroughly. 

—During the past week Mr. Wethered from New 
York gave a talk before the horticultural seminar upon 
" Greenhouse Construction " and Mr. Davy gave 
one upon •■ Care of Shade Trees. " 

— Word has been received that Arthur A. 
Racicot, Jr., ex- '06 has been successful in passing 
the examination for a commission as 2nd Lieutenant 
in the U. S. Marine Corps. His position was ninth 
in a list of 14 who passed. 

— The junior class elected to serve on the " Prom " 
committee the following men : from the faculty 
Professor Waugh, Professor Lull, and Professor 
Hasbrouck ; from the class, H. O. Russell, chairman, 
W. C. Tannatt, G. W. Sleeper, H. A. Suhlke, R. 
Wellington. R. W. Peakes. W. O. Taft. S. S. 
Rogers, and G. T. French. 



winding up her work for the year 1904. should feel 
pleased with the year's achievements. 

But at this late hour, the entire undergraduate body 
is overshadowed by that dark, gloomy storm-cloud 
which has threatened us for so long— the cloud of 
internal dissension. The causes of the present deplor- 
able state of mind in which the students have plunged 
arise from M. A. C.'s four points of the compass. 
And if the bitter feelings are allowed to go any fur- 
ther, the college spirit for some time to come will 
suffer Irreparable loss. 

And what is a college with weak and disordered col- 
lege spirit ? 

All those phases of college work which depend 
more or less on good college spirit will be paralyzed. 
Surely every loyal and faithful son of Massachusetts 
ought to do his best to prevent any such conditions. 
And the gravity of the present situation should be 
plain to every undergraduate. We must break down 
this angry feeling that exists between the associations 
of undergraduates, if we wish to push along the best 
Interests of the college. 

" The kind and tender spirit of Christmastide shall 
rule in the hearts of men throughout all the wide 
earth." 

This is the dream of poets and prophets and the 
Autocrat is not alone in hoping that it may soon come 
true for M. A. C. 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

[The failure of the Autocrat to appear in the last 
tw^ tasues of the Signal is due to his absence from 
college for the last five weeks.J 

It is delightful to everybody just at this time to look 
over the Christmas numbers of the periodicals and 
magazines with their beautiful illustrations and read 
the poems and Christmas stories. And all seem to 
join in a chorus to repeat with variations that Christ- 
mas song of the angels. " On earth peace, goodwill 
toward all men." 

This message strikes the Autocrat as being very 
appropriate to place before the undergraduate body of 
this college. To say the least, Massachusetts, In 



This matter necessitates careful handling, but the 
Autocrat believes that what he has reference to is 
plain to all. We certainly need to assume a more 
liberal spirit towards each other and cast away all sel- 
fish ambition if we wish to do our share in pushing our 
college to the front. 



AN INTERESTING GROUP OF BANANAS. 

Among the important commercial and ornamental 
plants found in the tropics and in our Northern green- 
houses the banana holds a place in the front rank. 
It is called Musa after a Roman physician, and is 
known also as the plantain tree. 

It is a large herbaceous plant, with immense, long, 
undivided leaves, which are parallel-veined. The 
sheathing leaf stalks form the false stem. The flow- 
ers are unisexual, formed in clusters, and are borne on 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



a stalk coming and hanging down from the top of the 
false stem. 

The banana is a staple crop in all the tropics and 
is grown in large numbers In colder climates for orna- 
mental purposes. The principle species Is the Musa 
Textll.s. grown largely in the Philippine Islands, and 
known in commerce for its fibre, the common manila 
hemp; it is also used by landscape gardeners for dec- 
orative purposes, the smaller ones for bedding out 
A sheltered place must be obtained, and an abundance 
of sunshine is invaluable for their development In win- 
ter they are taken inside ; if their ornamental value 
only is desired the tops are cut back and the roots 
stored over winter, new growths starting in the spring 
The Abyssinian banana. Musa Ensete, is one of the 
largest species and probably the best ornamental and 
most hardy of all the bananas. It is also very quickty 
grown. The fruit, however, Is not edible. The leaves 
are especially large, specimens measuring from 15 to 
20 feet in length. The flower is of a whitish color 

The Musa Cavendishii is a dwarf species which is 
used for ornamental purposes ; the fruit Is also edible 
It reproduces itself by sending out suckers which take 
the old plant's place when it has fruited and died 
This is a very hardy type, being grown extensively in 
the Southern states, and in the Hawaiian Islands. 

The common banana of commerce is Musa Sapi- 
entum. The fruit is borne on stalks four to five feet 
long, the fruit bract being a deep rich purple color It 
is a native of India but is grown throughout the tropics 
There are several varieties of this species, among 
them the red banana often seen in fruit stores. 

It may be interesting to note that the above varie- 
ties are represented in the college greenhouse, three 
species of which are now in bloom and developing 
fruits. Considering the enormous commercial value 
of the banana and with the opportunity thus afforded 
one should not fail to become acquainted with the 
specimens shown In our Plant House. C. ( '05. 



55 



>> 



THOREAU'S « UNSOCIAL EXPERIMENT. 

In the historic town of Concord Is laid the scene of 
Henry David Thoreau's life. There he was born in 
1817, and there he passed almost his entire life 
which, to say the least, was very peculiar. His 
father's ancestors were of French descent, while his 
mother's were purely English. From both, young 



Thoreau Inherited many characteristics. From 
father he developed a revolutionary spirit and a love 
of the wild and the savage ; but from his mother came 
the want of sociability. The civilized world chafed 
him , and he held colleges in small esteem, although 
his debt to them was great. Many professions of life 
did he enter into ; but for none was he willing to 
sacrifice his Increasing ambition for knowledge and 
action. He was not a man ambitious to gain fame or 
riches. On the other hand he chose to be rich by 
making his wants few and supplying them himself. 
He was a person who could not bear to do again what 
he had once done well and consequently, in his early 
manhood, changed from one thing to another To 
quote an old friend of his we may sum up his peculiar- 
ities in a few words. •• He was bred to no profession 
he lived alone, he never went to church, he never 
voted, he ate no flesh, he never knew the use of 
tobacco, and though a naturalist he used neither traps 
nor gun. 

Even from the boyhood days of Thoreau we begin 
to see traces of his growing tendencies, which were 
brought out so forcibly In his later years. He possessed 
a strong desire for nature ; its beauties and hidden 
treasures. As a result he tried a singular and at the 
same time a most interesting experiment. It was a 
sort of -• Brook Farm", only that was asocial experi- 
ment, while Thoreau's was decidedly unsocial. In his 
twenty-eighth year he built a small hut beside Walden 
pond. Here he lived for two years far from friends 
and in the heart of the woods, his only companions 
being the birds and squirrels, and occasionally a visitor 
from town. He tells us that here he lived in 
perfect happiness, performing all household duties and 
working a few weeks each summer as a means of sup- 
port during the rest of the year. He always earned 
his money by manual labor and never accepted any 
lengthy contracts. Seldom was he seen in town but 
when obliged to go. he always took great precaution 
to go and come unobserved. 

Many wonder why he went to Walden. and what his 
purpose was. It was not a desire to live cheaply ; but 
to transact a little business with the fewest means, 
besides showing to his fellowmen a life •• worth living." 
When asked his purpose he said. <• I went to the woods 
because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the 
essential facts of life, to learn what It had to teach and 



1 











56 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



not. when my end came, to discover that I had not 
lived." Here at Walden he found ample opportunity 
to fulfill all of his intentions. His life was one long 
holiday, broken only when it became necessary for him 
to obtain money. He studied the habits of the wild 
animals, he studied the plants, he fished, he cultivated 
his garden, he swam in the pond, he studied, and he 
wrote. Often he would sit motionless, from morn till 
eve. upon the threshold of the small door and study 
the phenomena of nature about him. It was certainly 
a beautiful life and one adapted especially to a man of 
Thoreau's nature. Others could not, as he did. enjoy 
nor reap benefits.either for themselves or their fellow- 
men.from such a life. Such men as John Field, the 
poor bog-digger, could not live in this way. They 
would be quite unsuccessful should they attempt to 
catch a dinner with the hook and line. Unlike 
Thoreau, although expert in other callings, they do not 
understand the art of fishing as did he. To these 
men It might be easier to swing a bog hoe and much 
more agreeable to obtain a living thus than live as did 
Thoreau. To them the beauties of nature are 
secondary. 

At Walden Thoreau proved to his own and to a few 
others' satisfaction that men were simply wasting 
their lives in trying to keep themselves properly 
clothed, sheltered, and fed. To him " the mass of 
men were leading lives of quiet desperation." He 
wished further to prove that by living simply one could 
supply all of his wants with less than one hundred 
dollars a year. Besides he could have two-thirds of 
his time In which to enjoy nature and satisfy his 
intellect. In attempting to prove these things he dis- 
regarded many important points. He claimed to 
detest c 
that part 

always remained near enough to the Concord corner 
of it to feel the Impression he made." Morever he 
borrows its ax to build his shanty, he obtains bricks 
for his chimney, he reads its papers, and takes its 
money. We conclude that a nation like Thoreau's 
must either become uncivilized or else tend towards 
that civilization at which they scorn. His life was 
indeed helpful In that its teachings caused many to 
hesitate and consider the question of whether or not 
their lives were being wasted. 

During the first part of his peculiar life Thoreau 



was regarded as an oddity ; but he finally came to be 
admired by his townsmen. Few of his books were 
published before his death and those were not well 
received by the public. As a lecturer he was not 
successful, although people always had a desire to 
hear what he was going to say. Both Lowell and 
Emerson have criticised him severely and the latter 
says : " 1 cannot help counting It a fault in him that 
he had no ambition." His lack of ambition made 
him the leader of a berrying party instead of a leader 
of men, as he might have been. However, today he 
is much more highly esteemed by critics than he was 
twenty years ago. His name now stands first in the 
list of secondary writers while many, who at first 
gained temporary fame, are ranked below him today. 
His life, we must admit, was of some use to 
mankind. He gave the world something which was 
needed ; but along with this came much which was 
worse than useless. While Thoreau lived, many did 
not appreciate the good in his teachings. It Is only 
in the years succeeding his death that they realized 
the value in them. His solitary communion with 
nature did not have any sweetening effect upon his 
character as is shown in some of his later works. 
And moreover his shanty life was not a true indepen- 
dency of mankind though he claimed it to be such. 
He was sincerity itself and his was an experience, 
which could be set aside. 



D*p&rtm*ivf fiot*s. 



aation. in fact he wished to be as far from 
of the world as possible. But still " he 



HORTICULTURAL. 

P. F. Staples, '04. has spent much time working 
on the seedless variety of apples which is at present 
attracting such wide-spread attention in the horticul- 
tural world. An article written by Mr. Staples 
appared in a recent issue of the New England Home- 
stead which is considered to be the best ever written 
on the subject. This work Is part of his graduate 
course of study. 

Professor Greene lectured before the New Hamp- 
shire State Horticultural society at Keene. N. H. last 
week. 

The State Board of Agriculture met last week at 
South Framingham. All the trustees were present, 
also many of the college professors and alumni, of 




o 



Ll. 
O 

2 
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CD 
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2 



1 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



57 






whom were President Goodell. Professor Brooks. 
Professor Waugh and Dr. Stone from the faculty, 
and Bowker, 71, Southwick, 75. Howard, 75, Whlt- 
aker, '81, Plumb. '82 and Legate. '9 1. C. S. Plumb, 
'82, of Ohio was a prominent speaker. 

BOTANICAL. 

Mr. Osmun, '03, left the station Friday Dec. 10, 
for his vacation. He expects to spend most of his 
time visiting some of the Agricultural experiment 
stations. 

Dr. Stone lectured in Springfield Nov. 19th before 
the Springfield Botanical Club on Lichens. 

ZOOLOGICAL JOURNAL CLUB. 

The students of the zoological department have 
been organized Into a Journal club which holds a 
meeting each Tuesday at 4-45 p. m. One meeting 
a month is given up to a review of the zoological lit- 
erature of the month, while at the other meetings dif- 
ferent phases of the work are presented by the mem- 
bers or by outside speakers. On Nov. 15, Dr. Fer- 
nald gave an instructive talk on the relation between 
the Medusa and the Hydra. Two weeks later Pro- 
fessor Tyler of Amherst college gave his interesting 
lecture on " The Survival of the Fittest " to a crowded 
audience, while at the last meeting of the club Miss 
Thayer, a special student, reviewed Dana's •' Corals 
and Coral Islands." 

Dr. Loomis of Amherst college lectured before 
the Zoological Journal club Tuesday afternoon on 
.' The Evolution of the Horse." The lecture was 
illustrated by lantern slides. 

The Entomological Journal club held Its regular 
December meeting on the first Saturday of the 
month. 

■• Nature's Hieroglyphics," by Dr. R. S. Lull, is the 
title of a very Interesting article on •' Creatures far 
antedating man in antiquity," in the December number 
of the Popular Science Monthly. 

Mr. Nawa, Japanese entomologist, has been spend- 
ing several days at the Insectary studying the collec- 
tions. He is one of the Nawa family which has 
done so much for this science In Japan. 

The Boston Herald for Dec. 4 gave a full page to 
a review of Dr. R. L. Lull's work on fossil animals. 
We were glad to see it ; it speaks well for our Profes- 
sor of Zoology. 



Alu 



mm. 



On Friday evening. Dec. 2, His Excellency, 
John L. Bates, Governor of the Commonwealth, gave 
a banquet at the Algonquin club In Boston in honor of 
H. R. H. Prince Fushimi of Japan. President 
Goodell was present as the representative of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College, which was so closely 
connected with the founding of the Imperial Agricul- 
tural college of Japan. Former President Clark of 
our Alma Mater together with five of the alumni of 
M. A. C. were the founders of that college, and for 
several years, Prof. W. P. Brooks, now occupying 
the chair of Agriculture at this college, was president 
of the Imperial college. 

Ex-76. — M. T. Rogers, Manager of the School 
department of the Scarborough Company, Boston. 

'96.— Frank L. Clapp. 294 North Willow St.. Wat- 
erbury, Conn. He Is at the office of the city engi- 
neer, and is in charge of the city sewage system. 

'99. — W. A. Hooker, who has been working in 
Texas on the cotton boll Commission, is expecting to 
resume his post-graduate work at the college after 
Christmas. 

'02. — H. E. Hodgkiss, assistant entomologist at 
the New York experiment station at Geneva, will stop 
in Amherst Dec. 19 for a short visit. 

•04. — A. W. Gilbert is taking, under Professor 
Hunt of Cornell, for his major subject for the degree 
of Ph. D.. work on the Influences affecting the ger- 
mination of seeds. 

•04. — J. W. Gregg has accepted a position as prac- 
tical landscape gardener and engineer at Mt. Pleas- 
ant, Texas. 



lrvt?rcoll{gi& a te. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

Yale has a basketball schedule this year of 39 
games. 

Compulsory attendance at church has been discon- 
tinued at Wesleyan. 

Cornell has given up the honor system, although 
not calling It a failure, and returned to the proctor 
system. 



I 






58 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Rollins, 1905, of Amherst, holds the New England 
Intercollegiate record as a shot-putter. 

Leland Stamford Jr. university has lost by fire the 
forestry station located at Santa Monica. 

The naval academy at Annapolis has recently 
suspended a cadet for smoking in his rooms. 

A class in law for women has been started at New 
York university this fall with an enrollment of 19. 

•• Bloody Monday " with all Its dark meanings to 
the Freshman has been done away with at Harvard. 

Williams has just sustained a loss of over $20,000 
through a severe fire in one of her best dormitories. 

Williams college has been awarded a gold medal 
for its educational exhibit at the St. Louis exposition. 
A report made by the Harvard graduate treasurer 
gives a balance of receipts over expenditures amount- 
ing to $33,000, 

The expenditures of the class of 1905 of the 
University of California, in publishing their Junior 
annual, were $9,405.35 while the receipts were 
$9,605.50. 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment .'. ••• 

THAT'S US. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



Spkingkield, 



Mass 



Surprise PRIZES given away. 

to get the people to talk about bixlers' physical training in penmanship, the 
best method of instruction in the world-Saves 90 per cent, of time, etc. 

Merit Prizes, Surprize Prizes, Prize Prizes, Sure Prizes, Big Prizes, Little 
Prizes, Contingent Prize and other Prizes for little folks and big folks. Send 10c. 
for Business Penman, 12 Writing Mottoes, sample rapid Writing, skilled Bird 
Flourish, and full particulars. (1 Surprise Prize will be included, worth from 
10c. to a dollar, and a $10 Prize Prize goes with each 100th 10c. order-con- 

Prof. G. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



59 



The plan of having all students wearing caps and 
gowns on the campus is being considered by the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. 

Brown has introduced fencing and hopes soon to 
have men ready to meet those from other colleges 
on equal terms in this line. 

The first German University to adopt co-education 
in the University of Munich which has just agreed to 
admit women to the student body. 

The ^centennial of the changing of the name of 
Brown university from Rhode Island college was 
recently celebrated at Providence. 

The final game for the championship of the West 
is to be played by the universities of Michigan and 
Minnesota in the Stadium at St. Louis. 

Williams' new chapel. Thompson Memorial, will be 
the finest college chapel in the country. It will be 
ready for use Feb. 1 and costs about $350,000. 

A new technical school to be built at Birmingham, 
England, will cover 30 acres and will include a whole 
city of shops. A special feature, occupying an acre 
of land, is a model mine. 

Purdue is going to erect a memorial costing 
$100,000 to its undergraduates who were killed 
last year in a railroad wreck, while on their way to 
att-nd a football game. 

The Chicago university students have protested 
against the presence of the co-eds in the library of 
the law department, claiming that their presence there 
interferes with serious work. 

A football game, tug-of-war. slow bicycle race, etc., 
were given by the faculty of the University of 
Nebraska for the benefit of the college settlement 
fund. They had splendid success. 

The 'Varsity students at the University of Minnes- 
ota have started an organization for the prevention of 
theft. This will deal summarily with future offenders 
and is the direct outcome of a recent act of 
vandalism. 

Illinois students who support themselves while in 
college are going to organize a society for the exchange 
of ideas in reference to the best way to earn money 
while studying. The society contemplates starting an 
employment bureau later for student workers. — Ex. 

Dean Vincent of Chicago gave the characteristics 



Regals in Quarter Sizes 

Fit any foot. 

J. J. GARDNER, Agent, 

12 South College. 



XJ I^-TO- 13 A.T IS 



Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TELRMS STRICTLY CASH. 



Amhrrst, Mass. 



W. M. Sbais, '05. 



F. E. 8HAW, '07. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 



ROOM 2i NORTH COLLEGE. 






6o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 












: 



of a college athlete, before a gathering of the same. 
as follows: " The leading characteristics of a college 
athlete who is an honest athlete are first, he is not a 
braggart ; second , he is not a whiner ; third, he is a 
sportsman and not a sport." 



REVIEW. 

We have recently received from Hinds, Noble & 
Eldredge, New York, a copy of the " Most Popular 
College Songs," price $.50. It is a collection made 
from the songs of all the colleges and is a very com- 
plete and satisfactory book. It is one that every col- 
lege fellow who likes music, college music, should 
possess. It contains most of our old standbys and a 
goodly number of new ones, and will give us a chance 
to have a change. 

The Pope Bicycle Daily Memorandum Calendar 
for 1905 with a leaf for every day is something every 
student needs for his desk. It is free at the Pope 
Mfg. Co.'s stores or can be obtained by sending five 
two-cent stamps to Pope Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 

The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Ouyer Hats and A. B. Kirsch- 

batim & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN ahd H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON dt THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Hmberst Ibouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



O. H. KBNDRICK, Rmormimro*. 



On Your Wag Dome 




STOP AT 



Johnson's 



for something to read on the way. 

BOOKS, PICTURES, STATIONERY. 

313-315 Main Street, - Spuinofiklu, Mass. 



Belle mean Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 18, 1905 



NO. 6 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Colueoe Signal. Amhkrst, Mass Thb Siohai will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance Is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. * 7 h" 1 ""™ 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN, 1905, Editor-in Chief. 
GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. Business Manager. 
RALPH WARE PEAKES. 1 906. Assistant Business Manager. 
ALLEN NEWMAN SWAIN. 1905. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT. 1906 Intercoltecnato 

iLBE^/DfvfsTAYToR'^OS IX ^T^ ^ GE0RCE HENRY CHAPMAN ' "°<" A-uS Notes. 

ALBERT DAVIS TAYLOR. 1905. College Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS 1907 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS. 1906. EDWIN DAN1ELS PH ILBRICK. 1907. Athletic. 



Terma, »I.OO per uear In adcance. Single Coplaa, IQc. Po»ta 9 Youf Idc ol United SW^iiid Canada, 8»c. eiSaT 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Senate. 
Readlng-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. S. Walker. Pres. Athletic Association. 

E. W. Newhall. Jr., Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

W. A. Munson. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Six Index. 

H. F. Thompson, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manager. 

F, H. Kennedy. Manager. 

G. W. Patch. Pres. 



Entered as secand-class matter, Past Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tbriaJs. 



We have, recently lost by resignation one of our 
most influential and indefatigable trustees, Hon. Elijah 
W. Wood of West Newton. Mass. Mr. Wood has 
served faithfully on the board of trustees for over fifteen 
years. For some time he has felt that his age was 
pressing too heavily on him for the proper discharge 
of his duties as trustee. He has several times before 
sought to resign ; but has reconsidered after long 
pleading from his friends. Mr. Wood has been promi- 
nent in political and in. agricultural matters, having 
served several terms as state representative and being 
a member of both the Massachusetts Horticultural 
society, and the Massachusetts Society for the Promo- 
tion of Agriculture. Mr. Wood has been a loyal friend of 
the college, and all who come in contact with him 
hold him in high esteem. 



vacancy caused by the resignation of trustee Wood 
has been received by those connected with the college 
with considerable surprise. Just the reasons for the 
appointment of Mr. Pollard it has been impossible to 
fathom. The advice of our alumni was evidently not 
taken into consideration in the matter, as Mr. Pollard's 
name had never been voted on by them. Mr. Pollard 
is a business man. a merchant, and although he has 
never taken an active part in agricultural affairs, still 
he will probably prove a valuable man on the board. 
It has been hinted that as Mr. Pollard is not an agri- 
cultural man he will not trouble himself much with our 
affairs. We earnestly hope that this will not prove 
the case and as we fail to see the significance of the 
remark we trust it will not come true. 



The appointment by Gov. Bates of Mr. Arthur L. 
Pollard of Lowell to the board of trustees to fill the 



The ] 906 Index which was distributed before the 
Christmas holidays is a very attractive volume and in 
general merit it ranks well among the best ever pro- 
duced. The cover of Japanese wood with stampings 
In red is most attractive ; while the dedication to Prof. 
C. H. Fernald is well chosen and is appreciated by all. 



62 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






Two innovations which add much to the value of the 
book are the pictures of the faculty and the autographs 
of the members of the junior class. The artistic work 
is good and profuse. If there is any criticism against 
it.it is that outside talent has been too freely called in. 
Some of the grinds and a few of the drives in the 
records of the 1906 men become almost too personal 
and jar somewhat. This is the severest criticism we 
have to make. We believe that above all things the 
Index should be clean and manly. We do not mean 
to insinuate that the Index has become dirty ; but any 
tendency to make fun out of personal oddities or 
physical shortcomings in any student should be sternly 
squelched. The 1906 Index, however, is one which 
any student may show his friends with pride, and every 
alumnus should be glad to place a copy In his office 
or home. We hope that this latter will actually take 
place for thereby two very important purposes would 
be accomplished ; the alumnus would be brought into 
closer touch with the present college life at his Alma 
Mater, and the fame of old Massachusetts would be 
more widely spread. 



63 



Umeketchi Nawa, assistant to Y. Nawa of Glfu. 
Japan, and editor of the little monthly entomological 
magazine, The Insect World, was recently in Amherst 
and spent about two days in examining the collection 
and entomological library at the Insectary. Mr. 
Nawa spent practically all summer in St. Louis in 
charge of the exhibit sent to the World's Fair by his 
chief, Y. Nawa. He also spent a day in looking over 
the collection at Harvard. Although able to write 
excellent English. Mr. Nawa can speak scarcely a 
word in English, and so, through lack of an interpreter, 
most of his conversation with Dr. Fernald was carried 
on " means of pen and paper. Mr. Y. Nawa, our 
visitor's father- in-law, is regarded as the foremost 
entomologist of Japan. In addition to his own work 
in collecting, etc. and in addition to editing his maga- 
zine, he also carries on a school for this study. Such 
a reputation has this institution that it is attended by 
advanced students and teachers from all over the 
Empire of Japan. His daughter is also closely con- 
nected with him in this work, and is well known for 
her delineating, which Is far-famed. Mr. U. Nawa 
took his last name by marrying her, as is the custom 
of the country. 



It is a cause of much sorrow to the student body 
that President Goodell, on account of sickness, has 
been forced to give up his active duties at the college, 
and, as soon as he can travel, seek a new measure of 
health in a climate more lenient to him. For many 
years our President's health has been poor and our 
severe New England winters have been particularly 
trying to him, making it necessary for him to use great | 
care for; his health and often forcing him to seek 
refuge in some southern country till the season of the 
year became more propitious here. This year disease 
has attacked him most violently, and while he suffers at 
his home the sympathy of all the students goes out to 
him, and the hope of all is that he may soon again 
receive back health and strength. As students at 
M. A. C, it seems that we can hardly say enough of 
what President Goodell has done for the upbuilding of 
our beloved Alma Mater. His work In its interest 
has been unceasing for over thirty-seven years. 
Through summer and winter, during vacations as well 
as during the college sessions, he has kept at his tasks. 
At first, as Professor of Modern Language and Eng- 
lish literature, it was he who was ever ready to step 
into any vacant place on the faculty ; and the diversity 
of the subjects in which he has given instruction is 
truly marvelous. Languages, English literature, his- 
tory, entomology, physiology, zoology, gymnastics, 
military tactics, rhetoric and elocution have all been 
under his domain. To his duties as instructor were 
also added those of college librarian ; and from nothing 
with which to begin he has created our present fine 
library which ranks among the best of its kind. As 
president of the college since 1886 he has worked in 
season and out of season at the college among the 
students, and at Boston and Washington among the 
legislators, for funds and new buildings to carry on and 
extend the work of the college. It is needless to say 
that all this energy has brought glory to this institution 
which is so dear to him ; but now It has left him worn 
with labor and torn with the pain of disease. Many have 
been the enticing offers for honorable and remunera- 
tive positions open to our President; and coming at a 
time, as some of them did, when the state of the col- 
lege was very low and its prospects for the future 
exceedingly dark, can we but admire the courage which 
kept him at his tasks and the determination with which 
he labored to put the college on a high and sound 
basis ? 



BASKET BALL. 

Massachusetts, 67; Holyoke. 12. 

The basket season opened with Massachusetts defeat- 
ing the Hoiyoke Consolidated 67-12. Although It was 
our first game the team played fairly well. Ladd in 
particular doing excellent work at centre. 

The summary : 

MASSACHUSETTS. HOLYOKE 

Taylor. Whitmarsh. I. f. r . g., Bullard. Hardigan 



Ladd, Adams, c. c A.| van 

Peters, Chapman. I. g. |, ,., stratton 

Hunt ' r - S- r. f.. Connor 

Score— Massachusetts 67, Holyoke 12. Goals from floor 
—Taylor 6. Whitmarsh 5. Ingham 5, Ladd 9. Chapman 2 
Peters 2. Hunt 4. Brien 2, Bullard, Stratton. Connor. Goals 
from foul— Hunt. Bullard. Alvan. Referee — Gardner 
Umpire — Hastings. 

Worcester Tech.. 34; Massachusetts. 21. 
In a close and Interesting game at the Drill Hall 
Worcester Tech. defeated Massachusetts by a score 
of 34-2 1 . The teams were quite evenly matched but 
the Worcester boys were much more accurate in 
shooting baskets. For Tech. Lawley excelled, while 
Hunt played well for Massachusetts. 



1. b 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

I. f.. Ingham 

r. f.. Cobb 

c, Taylor 

Hunt (Capt.) 

r. b.. Peters 



WORCESTER TECH. 

Butterfield, 1. t. 
Hall. r. f. 
Lawley. c. 
Martin (Capt.) 1. b. 
Steimer.r. b. 

Score— Worcester Tech. 34. 'Massachusetts 21. 
from floor— Martin 8, Lawley 4. Butterfield, Hall 3. Hunt 5 
Ingham 3. Cobb 2. Baskets on free tries— Hunt. Martin' 
Free tries missed— Hunt 9. Martin 3. Butterfield. Fouls 
called on— Martin 4. Hall. Steimer 3. Cobb. Hunt 3. Lawley 
2. Ingham. Referees— Gardner, Towne. Timer— Peters, 
Kennedy.— Time— Two 20 minute halves. Attendance— 200. 

•Worcester awarded 1 point for interference, 



Manager Gardner has arranged the following basket- 
ball schedule : 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



7. 
17. 
20. 
21. 
28. 
II. 
17. 
18. 
22. 
I. 
3. 
4. 



Worcester Tech. at Amherst. 
Holyoke Consolidated at Amherst. 
Newport Naval Reserves at Newport. 
Brown at Providence. 
Trinity at Amherst. 

Boston University at Amherst. 

Tufts at Medford. 

Andover at Andover. 

Delphi Athletic at Amherst. 
Norwich University at Northfield. 
University of Vermont at Burlington. 
Game pending. 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

Saturday afternoon and evening. Jan. 14. saw the 
occurrence of the third, and by far, most successful 
Informal, of, not only this season, but of all previous 
seasons. It was an Ideal day for such a gathering, 
and everybody seemed in the best of spirits for the 
occasion, so that from 5 to 9. jolly good fellowship 
reigned supreme. The occurrence of some of the 
initiation banquets the night before brought to town 
several alumni and outsiders who were present at the 
dance. The decorating witn bunting and tropical 
plants from the College greenhouses was quite simi- 
lar to that on previous occasions of a like nature. 
Brown of Amherst catered. 

Mrs. Wellington. Mrs. Cooley and Mrs. Waugh of 
Amherst received, aided by Mrs. Orcutt of North- 
ampton and the Misses Clark, Lasbey and Dulcher of 
South Hadley. 

Before adding a partial list of those present, it 
would seem proper to add that the presence of so 
many underclassmen was a cause of great satisfac- 
tion to the committee, as It assures the success of 
these times In years to come. 

Of the alumni, there were present ; Mr. and Mrs. 
H. D. Haskins of Amherst; Mr. and Mrs. P. H. 
Smith of Amherst ; Dr. A. W. Morrill of Washing- 
ton, D C. and Miss Lee of Mt. Holyoke ; C. P. Hal 
llgan of Bucks County. Pa. and Miss Proulx of Hat- 
field ; G. E. Proulx and W. V. Tower of Amherst ; 
C. F. Elwood of Greens Farms, Conn, and Miss Mar- 
tin of Wallingford, Conn.; P. F. Staples of Amherst 
and Miss Felton of Northampton. 

The undergraduates were represented by ; G.H.Allen 
and Miss Baker of Smith. H. D. Crosby and Miss 
Farrar of Amherst. C. S. Holcomb and Miss Eastern 
of Mt. Hoiyoke. J. F. Lyman and Miss Murlless of 
Mt. Holyoke. E. W. Newhall Jr. and Miss Peers of 
Smith. W. M. Sears and Miss Taylor of Ludlow. A. 
N. Swain and Miss Dodge of Smith. A. D. Taylor and 
Miss White of Mt. Holyoke. L. S. Walker and Miss 
Bates of Pelham. C. L. Whitaker and Miss Whltakcr 
of Northampton, P. F. Williams and Miss Robinson 
of Smith. G- N. Willis and Miss Ripley of Springfield. 
F. L. Yeaw and Miss Brush of Bridgeport. Conn., 
F. C. Pray and Miss Hall of North Amherst, G. T. 
French and Miss Nolan of Hatfield. H. M. Russell 
and Miss C, Goodnow of Amherst. G. W. Sleeper and 



64 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Miss La Vene of Mt. Holyoke, H. A. Suhlke and 
Miss Drake of New Hartford, Conn., W. O. Taft and 
Miss Sanborn of Amherst, C. E. Hood and Miss 
Goodnow of Amherst, C. H. Chadwick and Miss 
Livers of Amherst, M. H. Clark and Miss Austin of 
Smith, H.T.Pierce and Miss Hawley of Amherst, F.C. 
Peters and Miss Love of Mt. Holyoke, E. D Philbrick 
and Miss Farnsworth of Holyoke. W. D. Barlow and 
Miss Tanner of Smith, H. H. Green and Miss Kane 
of Mt. Holyoke, C. F. Allen and Miss Scott of Provi- 
dence, F. L. Austin and Miss Legros of Mt. Holyoke, 
C. Bates and Miss Carlton of Mt. Holyoke, R. R. 
Blake andMiss Rysbyof Smith.M. M.Browne and Miss 
French of Smith, T. R. Cobb and Miss Burnham of 
Holyoke, L.W. Chapman and Miss Bartlett of Mt. Hol- 
yoke, H. C. Chase and Miss Bardwell of Amherst, R. 
E. Cutting and Miss Ray of Amherst, S. L. Daven- 
port and Miss Hood of Mt. Holyoke, C. L. Flint and 
Miss Lyman of Mt. Holyoke, K. E. Gillett and Miss 
May of Smith, R. H. Jackson and Miss Henry of 
Amherst, J. R. Parker and Miss Woodworth of Mt. 
Holyoke. H. B. Reed and Miss Dodge of Mt. Holyoke, 
A. D. Farrar and Miss Cobb of Amherst, Mr. Randall 
of N. H. State and Miss Bailey of Mt. Holyoke, Mr. 
Edwards of Bowdoin and Miss Schauffler of Smith. 



EXTENSION TEACHING IN AGRICULTURE. 

By Prof. S.W.Fletcher of Cornell University, M.A.C. '96. 

THE FARMERS' READING-COURSE. 

Ever since the establishment of the land-grant Col- 
leges of Agriculture, it has been felt that some means 
should be provided for reaching the farmers who are 
not able to attend these colleges. This feeling has 
found expression in Farmers' Reading-Courses and in 
Farm. V Institutes, two co-ordinate lines of work 
which have a common aim and which should be more 
closely affiliated than they have been hitherto. The 
first Farmer's Reading-Course, of which there Is 
authentic record, was established in 1882 at the Onta- 
rio Agricultural College. Farmers' Reading-Courses, 
under this or other names, are now conducted by the 
Agricultural Colleges of Pennsylvania, Connecticut, 
Michigan, New York, New Hampshire and South 
Dakota. The Agricultural Colleges of Indiana, 
Rhode Island, Texas, Massachusetts, Missouri, Ten- 
nessee, and Virginia have each established a Farmer's 
Reading-Course at some time, but it is now discon- 



tinued. There are also several Correspondence 
Courses in Agriculture conducted by private interests. 
Of these that conducted by the Home Correspondence 
School of Springfield, which is in the charge of Prof. 
W. P. Brooks of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, is the most widely known. 

Let us first understand the necessity for this work. 
Is it not encroaching upon the field of the Experi- 
ment Station Bulletin ? It is not, for three reasons. 
In the first place, the Act establishing the Experiment 
Stations provides that Bulletins shall be published, 
containing the results of experiments and such other 
information as will be useful to the farmer ; but the 
feeling now is that the province of the Experiment 
Station Bulletin should be limited to investigational 
work alone. This leaves a wide gap, for the farmer 
must have some knowledge of the elementary princi- 
ples of Agriculture before he can derive the greatest 
benefit from the bulletins, many of which are, and of 
necessity must be, more or less technical. Again.an 
Experiment Station bulletin on Bovine Tuberculosis 
may be followed by one on Orchard Cover Crops. 
To be of greatest value, reading must be methodical 
and progressive. The Farmers' Reading-Course 
aims to meet this need. 

Furthermore.the farmers whom we wish to reach most 
with the Reading-Course, are not those whose names 
are on Experiment Station Mailing lists. They are 
not those who attend Farmers' Institutes or who sub- 
scribe for the best agricultural papers. Many farmers 
do not care to learn by reading; many more desire to 
learn, but their educational opportunities have been so 
limited and their habit of thought is so restricted that 
the average agricultural book or experiment Station 
bulletin is sealed to them. To such men, the short, 
pithy, elementary bulletins of the Farmers' Reading- 
Course are an awakening, and a stimulus to further 
reading. The Farmers' Reading-Course, therefore, 
does not encroach upon the field of the Experiment 
Station bulletin but should be preparatory and supple- 
mentary to It. The Farmers' Reading-Course bulle- 
tins are intended to be easy reading, hence they are 
adapted for the many. Experiment Station bulletins 
are necessarily adapted only for the few. The main 
idea of the Farmers' Reading-Course, as I see It, is 

I to take the great non-reading class of farmers and 
prepare them to read agricultural books, journals and 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



65 



bulletins understandingly. When they have reached 
this point, they can take care of themselves. 

The Farmers' Reading-Course is still a compara- 
tively new movement. It has not yet reached the 
point where there is a definiteness of ideals. There 
are now, and necessarily must be for some time to 
come, many changes in the organization of the work, 
due to an enlarging understanding of the ways by 
which the farmer may be reached most effectively. 
Some Farmers' Reading- Courses have been moder- 
ately successful along certain lines ; none has by any 
means attained to the full measure of usefulness of 
which such a course is capable, I shall now attempt 
to outline some of the reasons for the failures, and 
some of the characteristics of the ideal Farmers* 
Reading-Course, as the writer sees it. 

Most Farmers' Reading-Courses have not been 
successful because they have shot too high. They 
have outlined very elaborate courses of reading in 
current books and bulletins, sometimes recommending 
literature, every page of which fairly bristled with 
technicalities. Some Farmers' Reading-Courses 
which I have seen, would almost stagger a graduate 
of an Agricultural College. A few of the best edu- 
cated farmers have been able to use them with profit, 
but they do not appeal to the majority of farm ers, 
because they are too technical. A large proportion 
of the farmers have not yet formed the reading 
habit. They take one or two farm papers and read 
them quite regularly. Perhaps they occasionally 
look over an Experiment Station bulletin, but it is my 
observation that fewer farmers actually read and digest 
Experiment Station bulletins than is commonly sup- 
posed. Aside from this, they read very little on agri- 
cultural subjects. Nothing could be more impractical 
than to ask these men to wade through several three- 
hundred page books, most of which were written from 
the point of view of the teacher, rather than from 
that of the farmer. It is a misfortune that so many 
of our agricultural books smack of the Lecture- 
room, rather than of the soil. The farmer who tries 
to read them is quick to notice this and to condemn it. 
The Farmers' Reading Course, therefore, should 
not only suggest a course of reading in agricultural 
books and bulletins for those whose education has qual- 
ified them to read such literature but It should also 
provide more elementary reading matter for those who 



would not be interested In this advanced reading. 
The Cornell Reading-Course bulletin is an effort — not 
yet entirely successful— in this direction. The bulle- 
tin should be short, pithy, practical, and abounding in 
word-pictures drawn from farm life. It should be 
printed on good paper and well illustrated, so that it 
will catch the eye and Invite the attention of the 
farmer who is " not much of a hand to read." It 
should be written in the language of the farm, not of 
the class-room. Technical words and long tables of 
figures should be absent. The Reading-Course bul- 
letin should discuss the principles of agriculture, 
which can be applied everywhere, not mere practice, 
which is local and conflicting. It should not be a 
syllabus or a book, but an illumination of a few very 
important points. If we can once get the interest of 
the farmer by means of these short readable, attrac- 
tive bulletins, it will not be difficult to draw him on to 
further reading. 

Accompanying each bulletin should be some ques- 
tions on the subject discussed. These the reader 
should be asked, but not required to answer. In the 
Cornell Farmers' Reading-Course, this "Discussion- 
Paper " is sent out with each Reading-Course bulle- 
tin. The questions are designed to draw out the per- 
sonal experience of the reader and stimulate his 
observation. As the Cornell Discussion- Paper says, 
" We should like to know your own ideas on these 
subjects. On some of these points you have prob- 
ably had experience which will be interesting and 
valuable to us. No matter what the bulletin says, if 
you have different ideas upon any of these subjects, 
do not hesitate to state them on this paper and give 
your reasons. We can learn from each other. " The 
questions in the Discussion- Paper which accompanies 
the Cornell Reading-Course bulletin on " The Soil ; 
What it Is." will illustrate this point: 

•' 1. Is there any large body of soil being made or 
transported on your farm ? Tell us about It. 

2. What is your idea as to the reasons why soils 
become ' worn-out '? Is there any worn-out soil In 
your neighborhood ? 

3. How would you go to work to Improve a worn- 
out soil ? 

4. Have you ever tried green-manuring ? With 
what crops, and with what results ? 

5. Have you found that it pays to practice rota- 
tion of crops ? 



I 



66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



67 



Why do you 



6. What rotations do you follow ? 
arrange the crops as you have ? 

7. What other rotations are followed in your 
neighborhood? What is your opinion of these ?" 

These Discussion papers are considered as personal 
letters. They are examined carefully and answered 
if they contain any points about which correspondence 
is desirable. 

The Farmers' Reading-Course should be progres- 
sive. The specially prepared and elementary Read- 
ing-Course bulletins will have failed in their mission If 
they do not interest the farmers sufficiently so that he 
desires to read further on that subject. At the end 
of each bulletin in the Cornell Farmers' Reading- 
Course, is this: 
" To The Reader : 

If you are interested in this bulletin, you 
should secure other literature which will give you a 
fuller knowledge of the subject. The Reading-Course 
bulletins are elementary and brief. You should sup- 
plement them with reading from other sources." 
Then follows a list of books and bulletins which it Is 
suggested that the reader may purchase and read. 
But it is not enough to merely recommend books. 
The Correspondence Course in Agriculture of the 
Pennsylvania State College has an excellent plan of 
sending to the readers, with each book recommended, 
a short outline which explains and emphasizes its 
most important points and gives the jlst of the book 
in a form easy to remember. The elementary Far- 
mers' Reading-Course has now merged into the more 
advanced reading, called at Cornell the Correspond- 
ence Course in Agriculture. This is where most 
Reading-Courses begin, but It is half way up the 
ladder Neither is complete without the other. 

So lar as possible, the members of the Farmers' 
Reading-Course should be grouped in Farmers' Read- 
ing-Clubs. The flame of interest burns brighter if 
there are several to tend the fire. Anything which 
can be done to bring the farmers together for the 
purpose of talking over their mutual interests is a 
long step towards correcting the greatest fault which 
farmers have, as a class. Some Granges are organ- 
ized as Reading-Clubs and use' the bulletins In their 
meetings. Some of the best Cornell Reading-Clubs 
meet from house to house and are the center of the 
socia 1 , as well as the educational life of the farming 



community. The Cornell Farmers' Reading-Course, 
which is conducted only In the state of New York, 
has organized over two hundred and fifty Farmers' 
Reading-Clubs in the past four years. 

The next step is the Traveling Library. At Cor- 
nell, this part of the work is conducted with the 
co-operation of the State Library at Albany. From 
ten to a hundred books may be sent to a group of 
rural people, usually a Farmers' Reading-Club, on the 
payment of a nominal sum which scarcely covers 
express charges. These books may be kept six 
months and may then be exchanged for others. A 
third of the books are on agricultural subjects, the 
others are on history, science, biography, travel and 
fiction : books which make for a broader outlook and 
higher culture. 

The salient features of a Farmers' Reading-Course, 
It appears to me, should be these : 

1. It should be progressive. It should aim to con- 
stantly lead the readers to take up more thorough and 
advanced reading in the agricultural subjects which 

Interest them most. 

2. It should be flexible and adaptive. It should 
provide elementary reading for the beginner, and more 
advanced reading for those who are fitted to receive 
it. It should try to help all farmers who desire to 
learn and to Improve their farming, both the farmer 
who is behind the times, and the farmer who Is up 
to-date. It should give encouragement to the begin- 
ner as well as advice to the expert. It should 
endeavor to help the man who says, " farming does 
not pay," as well as the man who says " the farm 
pays me well." 

3. It should be personal. The needs of each 
individual reader should be studied. He should be 
invited to write his own views and to ask questions. 
These personal letters should be answered promptly 
and carefully. The correspondent should be made to 
feel that he has a friend, not merely an instructor In 
the editor. The more of this personal element there 
Is in Farmers' Reading-Course work, the more suc- 
cessful it will be. 

4. It should make for higher living as well as 
better farming. With the advent of the Traveling 
Library, the readers are Introduced to books which 
broaden the horizon and raise the Ideals of life. If 
the Farmers' Reading-Course did nothing but help a 



man to till the soil better, it would still be worth 
while, but since it also tries to make him a broader 
man, It appeals to me as being one of the Important 
agricultural movements of our times. 



Colleg? Notts- 



—Caldwell. '08, has left college. 
— Corp. T. F. Hunt has been promoted to a Ser- 
geant and F. C. Pray has been appointed corporal In 
the battalion. 

— Dr. Fernald, who was present at the Science 
meetings at Philadelphia, recently visited the Carnegie 
Museum at Pittsburg, Pa. 

— E. A. Back, '04, is instructing the members of 
the short course In Zoology and W. E. Tottlngham, 
'04, is instructing in the chemistry of milk. 

— There Is a record-breaking class In the ten 
weeks' course, and a large number were refused 
admission because of lack of accommodation. 

— Harold M. Edwards of Bowdoin college attended 
the Kappa Sigma banquet at the Amherst House last 
Friday evening, being the delegate from Alpha Rho 
chapter. 

— A large number of alumni have visited college 
since the Christmas holidays and we note with pleas- 
ure the number of graduates who were present at the 
Informal. 

— The senior nominating committee for class day 
speakers has been elected as follows : G. W. Patch, 
chairman ; H. L. Tompson, J. J. Gardner, B. Tupper. 
H. L. Barnes and A. D. Taylor. 

— A large number of applications have been 
received at the horticultural department for men to 
work In the various branches of horticulture and land- 
scape work during the spring rush. 

—J. L. Randall and C. O. Dodge represented Beta 
Kappa chapter of the New Hampshire State college 
at the annual Initiation and banquet of the Gamma 
Delta chapter of Kappa Sigma here last week. 

— The Signal board desires the freshmen to show 
a little more Interest in this paper and make an effort 
to send In their contributions early. The paper needs 
the support of the best literary workers and every one 
should give himself a fair trial. 



— The basketball game with Worcester Tech. was 
somewhat of a disappointment but it clearly showed 
the lack of practice against a strong scrub. Now that 
the practice is to be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays 
after drill there should be no more want of men for 
the scrub. 

— At present there is a movement on foot among 
the Western alumni to establish a prize of something 
like $25 to be given to a member of one of the upper 
classes who shall have made the most advancement 
in scholarship, physical bearing, and manly character 
since his entrance Into college. Nothing definite has 
as yet been determined upon, but It is expected that 
there will be before long. 

— " Mistakes will happen in the best regulated fam- 
ilies" and through an oversight Manager Newhall's 
name was omitted in our recent football number. 
Newhall has been one of the most faithful managers 
that any M. A. C. team ever had and was untiring In 
his efforts to bring out a winning team. The sched- 
ule was without doubt the strongest played by any 
minor college in the East and on all the trips his 
thoughtfulness for the comfort of the men was plainly 
evident. No, we shall never forget "Jack." 

— The Government has presented the College 
Library with a reprint copy of the Jefferson Bible. 
With the exception of the copy owned by President 
Goodell, it is believed to be the only one In Amherst, 
This Bible is entitled " The Life and Morals of Jesus 
of Nazareth Extracted Textually from the Gospels In 
Greek, Latin, French, and English " by Thomas Jef- 
ferson. The original volume of this work was pur- 
chased In 1895 by the United States National Mus- 
eum at Washington. After coming into the posses- 
ion of the National Museum, considerable interest 
was manifested in It. and as a result of this interest 
the present compilation has been presented to the 
public, through a resolution adopted by the 57th 
Congress, first session. 

— The following members of the freshman class 
have been Initiated into the various fraternities In col- 
lege : College Shakespearian Club — C. F. Allen, B. 
W. Bangs, T. A. Barry, R. R. Blake. H. C. Chase, 
G. R. Cobb, W. J. Coleman, J. E. Draper. A. F. 
Hamburger, H. M. Jennison, F. A. Johnson, J. 
R. Grady, L. A. Shattuck, and A. J. Wheeldon. 



68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



69 






Kappa Sigma — F. L. Austin, C. Bates, E. W. Bailey, 
M. M. Browne. S. L. Davenport. P. W. Farrar, C. 
L. Flint, C. S. Gillett, H. K. Hayes, D. Larsen, D. 
P. Miller. J. R. Parker, H. B. Reed. W. S. Regan, 
and R. D. Whitmarsh. Phi Sigma Kappa — A. J. 
Anderson. F. L. Edwards. O. L. Clark, L. C. Cox, 
R. E. Cutting, K. E. Gillett. R. H. Jackson. J. C. 
Pagliery. F. E. Thurston, and R. H. Verbeck. Q. T. 
V, — L. W. Chapman, W. A. Cummings. J. Daniel, 
A. J. Farley. D. F. Ingalls, J. S. Potter, W. F. 
Sawyer, T. L. Warner, T. F. Waugh. J. W. Welling- 
ton. H. T. Wheeler, H. L. White. A. L. Whiting, 
and S. J. Wright. 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

Once again we are all together after a short rest. 
The old year has gone, a new year with all Its possi- 
bilities and encouragements is with us. The spirit of 
internal dissension is rapidly dying, closer friendships 
are being formed, and a feeling of satisfaction is 
spreading. The autocrat hopes that the four points 
of M. A. C.'s compass will soon be forgotten. Let us 
all forget our mere personal desires and work eagerly 
and willingly for our glorious Alma Mater. 

***** 

The basketball season is now well started. The 
autocrat has been glad to see the large attendance at 
our last two games. There is nothing that will help 
the team any better than for the student body and 
alumni to show their appreciation of the team's good 
work by attending the games and cheering them on 
to victory. It might be well to mention that prompt 
payment of taxes is the exception that proves this 

rule. 

***** 

"peaking of basketball where is the class of "07 ? 
Are they coming out with a challenge ? We are all 
waiting and the freshmen are getting anxious. The 
autocrat hopes that this interesting feature of the sea- 
son will soon arrive. 



The '• Chinese Department " in Columbia univer- 
sity has recently received from the Chinese govern- 
ment a copy of the Standard dictionary of the Chinese 
language. It consists of more than five thousand 
native volumes, which is equivalent to over one hun- 
dred volumes the size of an English encyclopedia. 



D?p&rtm?rvlr ^lot?s. 



HORTICULTURAL. 

The last number of the Photo Era contains an illus- 
trated article on " Microphotography without Special 
Apparatus " by Prof. F. A. Waugh. 

The Garden Magazine is the name of a bright new 
monthly horticultural publication just launched by 
Doubleday, Page &. Co., publishers of Country Life m 
America. The first number contains an article on 
Foxgloves.and many photographs by Professor Waugh. 

The Horticultural seminar will gather In the Stone 
chapel Thursday evening, Jan. 19, to hear a lecture 
on trees, forestry, etc. by Mr. George H. Moses of 
the New Hampshire Forestry Commission. The lec- 
ture will be illustrated with excellent stereopticon 
views. The public is Invited. The exact hour will 
be announced later, as Mr. Moses expects to come 
from Worcester on one of the evening trains. 

Professor Waugh left Monday for Delaware where 
he will lecture before the Horticultural society at 
Seaford. 

The Seniors in Horticulture and Floriculture were 
given a rare treat Monday, the 9th. Professor 
Waugh's desk was found heaped with dishes and 
dainties. Two large plates of mushrooms, gathered 
from the Upper House were sliced and prepared for 
eating in the chafing dishes. The Professor and Miss 
Sanborn established a reputation for excellent cooking 
and after the repast a vote of thanks was extended to 
the Professor. 

The following extract from a letter written to Pro- 
fessor Waugh by one of the leading landscape garden- 
ers of Chicago will be interesting to many of the stu- 
dents at M. A. C. He writes : •■ Prospects for busi- 
ness the coming spring are exceptionally good. I am 
busy all the time with plans, but shall have to drop 
them In ten days to go south for a month. I wish 
you would write me quite fully as to just what men 
you have for the landscape work. Let me know 
whether you have any who can draw up good plans 
and who has had some experience in planting out. 
I have engaged two students from the Michigan Agri- 
cultural college, and if I could get the right kind of 
men I could use an indefinite number of them. What 
can you offer ? ; ' 



FLORICULTURAL. 

A consignment of several hundred bulbs were 
received from H. Waterer, Seedsman and Bulb 
Importer, 107 So. 7th St., Philadelphia. Pa., just 
before college closed for the Christmas vacation. 
The varieties represented were suitable for forcing 
and outside planting. This afforded the Seniors in 
Floriculture a good opportunity to become familiar 
with the appearance and names of the different kinds, 
and to note the variation of characterististics in 
species and varieties. They furnished also, excellent 
material for a laboratory exercise on preparing bulbs 
for forcing by potting, boxing, etc. The results at 
flowering time is being looked forward to with con- 
considerable interest. It would seem judging by the 
high quality of the bulbs received, that Mr. Waterer 
well deserves the credit of being one of the fore- 
most bulb importers in this country. The generosity 
of Mr. Waterer is much appreciated. 

The plant house mushroom bed, the preparation 
of which was supervised by the Seniors in Floriculture 
has commenced to bear the toothsome " vegetable 
beefsteak," so called. Six weeks from spawning the 
bed is the usual time for their appearance ; ours came 
two days ahead, which speaks well for the Floriculture 
men. 

ZOOLOGICAL. 
E. A. Back spoke on «• The Effect of Sedentary 
Life on Animals," before the Zoologi cal seminar, 
Jan. 10. 

CHEMICAL. 
The station is preparing a bulletin of forty pages on 
" The Analysis of Officially Collected Commercial 
Fertilizers." The bulletin will appear this week. 

Albert Parsons. '03, has commenced his regular 
tour of state inspection. 

BOTANICAL. 

Monahan, '03, is carrying on some interesting ex- 
periments on self-registering sun thermometers. 

Philip Smith '97, is at present working on the 
bacterial analysis of milk in the special laboratory, 
ENTOMOLOGICAL. 

The Journal club met at the Insectary last Satur- 
day morning and was addressed by Austin W. Morrill, 
'00, on the " Cotton Boll Weevil Investigation." He 
gave a brief outline of the methods adopted In fight- 



ing the pest. Mr. Osmun, '03, reported on his visit 
to the Deleware Experiment station. 

Dr. Fernald was reelected Nursery Inspector by 
the Board of Agriculture last week. 

The entire exhibit from the Entomological depart- 
ment at the St. Louis exposition was disposed of, to 
Prof. F. H. Snow of the University of Kansas in 
return for specimens sent here by him from the west 
and southwest. 

An addition has been made to the collection of 
Butterflies so that now it includes all the New Eng- 
land varieties. 

A collection of Hymenoptera from Europe Is due, 
comprising 25 selected specimens. 



RESOLUTIONS 

OF THE Q T. V. FRATERNITY 
BROTHER WILLIAM SPAULDING CHAPMAN. 

V/hereas, It has pleased God in His infinite wisdom to 
remove from our ranks our beloved brother William Spauld- 
ing Chapman and 

Whereas, We do keenly feel the loss of him who was to us 
a brother be it 

Resoved, that we, the Amherst chapter of Q. T. V. frater- 
nity desire to express our heartfelt sympathy to his family in 
this their day of sorrow. And be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, a copy to the College Signal. Amherst 
Record and Attleboro Sun for publication ; also a copy to be 
kept on file in the Chapter Rooms. 

R. W. Peakes. 

C. W, Lewis, J Commltte. 

Clifton 



eakes. ) 

-ewis, > 

King. ) 



When we, the class of 1907, returned from the Christmas 
Holidays our hearts were saddened at the news of the death 
of our classmate. William Spaulding Chapman, who died at 
his home in Attleboro. Dec. 31, after a short illness. At a 
special meeting «f the class, the follow resolutions were 
adopted : 

Whereas, it has pleased our Almighty Father to remove 
from our midst our classmate. William Spaulding Chapman, 
be it therefore. 

Resolved, That we. the class of 1907, hereby express our 
deepest sorrow for our loss and extend our heartfelt sympa- 
thy to his family in this, their day of bereavement. 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, that a copy be placed in the class records 
and that a copy be sent to the College Signal for publication. 
Adelbert Joseph Larned, ) 
Edwin Daniels I'hilbrick, > For the Class. 
Arthur William Higgins. ) 






% 




7o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY. 

Whereas, Death has removed Henry A. Dearth, father of 
our classmate, George A. Dearth, 

Resolved, That we the members of the class of 1907 do 
recognize the severe loss which has come to our friend and 

classmate, 

Resolved. That we do hereby extend to the family of Mr. 
Dearth our deep and heartfelt sympathy in this their great 

sorrow ; 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family and that a copy be sent to the College 

Signal. 

Ernest A. Lincoln, ) 

Nils Engstrom. > For the Class. 

John N. Summers. ) 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment .*. ••• 

THAT'S US. 



Harvard University celebrated a peculiar sort of 
founder's day. On Nov. 29, services were held com- 
memorating the baptism of John Harvard, who gave 
the University Its start, at St. Savior's, Southward 
London. It was the 297th anniversary, the baptism 
having taken place Nov. 29, 1607. His baptism is 
celebrated instead of his birth, because the exact date 
of the latter Is not known.— Ex. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



SnuNanaLD, 



Mass 



Surprise PRIZES given away. 

to get the people to talk about bixler 8 ' physical training in penmanship, the 
best method of instruction in the world-Saves 90 per cent, of time, etc. 

Merit Prizes, Surprize Prizes, Prize Prizes, Sure Prizes, Big Prizes, Little 
Prizes, Contingent Prize and other Prizes for little folks and big folks. Send 10c. 
for Business Penman, 12 Writing Mottoes, sample rapid Writing, skilled Bird 
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10c. to a dollar, and a $10 Prize Prize goes with each 100th 10c. order-con- 

ditional.) Tn 

Prof. O. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



7* 



Alu 



mm. 



ATTENTION ALUMNI ! 

The " Junior Prom." of the class of 1906 will 
be held on Friday evening, Feb. 17. Come and 
renew old college associations, and also help to 
make the " Prom." a success. Watch this 
space for further details or write to H. M. Rus- 
sell, chairman of the committee. 

At the meeting of the American Society for 
Advancement of Science and Affiliated Societies 
which was held In Philadelphia, Convocation week 
were many M. A. C. men. Dr. Wellington attended 
the meetings of the Chemical society, Dr. Stone 
those concerning Botany, Dr. Lull the Paleontological 
and Dr. Fernald the Entomological. Among the 
alumni present were Charles Walker, '99, who is 
assistant of the Entomological Bureau. U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.Washington,D.C.;Pres.Washburn, 
78, of the National Farm school. Doylestown, Penn.; 
Charles Sumner Howe, 78, President of the Case 
School of Applied Science, also secretary of the 
American Associations of Bachelors of Science ; 
Homer J. Wheeler, "83, director of the R. I. Experi- 
ment Station ; Bernard H. Smith, '99, of Washing- 
ton. D. C; Dr. E. W. Allen. '85, editor of Experi- 
ment Station Records, Department of Agriculture. 
Washington. D. C; A. F. Burgess. '95, state ento- 
mologist of Illinois. 

The annual dinner and business meeting of the 
Alumni Club of Massachusetts will be held Jan. 27 at 
the American Hotel, Boston. Reception at 6 p. m. 
Dinner at 7 p. m. 

'92. — Alfred T. Beals and wife have been doing 
extensive work In Nature Study. Mrs. Beals received 
honorable mention at St. Louis for her work. 

'95. — Thomas P. Foley has recently purchased the 
" Four Bridge Farm " In Easthampton. He will 
engage in market gardening and general farming. 

'99.— The class of '99 held its fifth annual banquet 
at the Amherst House. Dec. 30. Five members of 
the class were present. The reunion was an informal 
affair. 

"99. — Dan A. Beaman has gone to Ponce. P. R.. 
where he has a position to teach Entomology and 
Horticulture. 



'99. -William Anson Hooker 
Washington, D. C. to resume 
studies. 



has returned from 
his post graduate 



Regals in Quarter Sizes 

Fit any foot. 

J.J.GARDNER, Agent, 

12 South College 



IJI».Tt>.|»A'rK 



Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 

FT. W. «IvO^VIV, 

Amiikkht, Mabh. 



W. M. SKA KM, '05. 



r. K. smaw, '07. 



A Full Line of 



Students' Supplies 



AT TUK 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM II NORTH COLLEGE. 






7» 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'99. — Charles M. Walker is visiting his parents 
in town. 

'00. — J. E. Halllgan, recently chemist in the sugar 
experiment station at New Orleans, La., has accepted 
a position with the Cuban American Sugar Co., of 
Perico. Cuba. 

'00. — Austin W. Morrill, expert entomologist of 
Victoria. Texas, visited college last week. 

'01. — John C. Barry. In charge of commercial 
tests of steam turbines for the General Electric Co. 
at Schenectady, N. Y. 

'02. — T. M. Carpenter is assistant in Human Food 
Investigation and has charge of the calorimeter at 
Wesleyan university, under Prof. W. O. Atwater. 

'03. — C. P. Halligan, professor of Horticulture at 
the National Farm School, Pa., is spending a few 
days at college. 

'03. — G. L. Barrus recently spent a few days 
around college. 

'04 — C. F. Elwood attended the Kappa Sigma 
Initiation and banquet last Friday evening. 

'04. — Arthur L. Peck spent a few days about col- 
lege last week. 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 

The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Guyer Hats ami A. B. Klrsch- 

Imiim & Co. Clothing. 

MOKAHfcll SHIRTS, PERRIN and II. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON <& THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Hmberst Ifoouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



O. M. KENDRICK. PmarmimTO*. 



Ob Your Wag Home 

STOP AT 

Johnson's 

for something to read on the way. 
BOOKS, PICTURES, STATIONERY. 




313-315 Main Street, 



Springfield, Mass. 



Bene laj Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 

The best Confeetions made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AOENTS FOR AMHERST. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS., FEBRUARY I, 1905 



NO. 7 



a*. . h a„ PUb ' iShed F ° r,nigh,ly ^ Studen,s °< ,h « Massachusetts Agric^aTc^eT 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed Co, , .™ ■» * 

sent to all subscribers until it, discontinuance is ordered and arrears aTpaL Substrlbe^ H ?"*'■ , ""l"^ ****■ Thb Siohal will be 
notify the Business M anager. «"", are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 



BGASD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Edltor-in Chief 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 190S, Business Manager. 
ALLEN NEWMAN SWA.N. ,905.^"" ^ "^ "^Assistant Business Manage, 

PERCY FREDERIC WILL.AMS. 1 905. Department Note,. GEORGE Sptll fuTJ' ! 9 ° & ' lnM egto e . 
ALBERT DAVIS TAYLOR. 1 905, College Note.. ™ "f ™ J CHAPMAN. I 906. Alumni Notes. 
ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS, JR., 1906. tnwl n». r ^ HIGGINS. 1907. 
EDWIN DANIELS PHILBRICK. 1907, Athletics 

J!^!^L^^ o. K Stat e- and C„„. da> 2<Sc . eJrtra . 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Senate. 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. S. Walker, Pros. Athletic Association 

E. W. Newhall. Jr., Manager. Base- Ball Association 

W. A. Munson. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Six Index. 

H. F. Thompson, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manager . 

F. H. Kennedy. Manager. 

G. W. Patch. Pres. 



Entered as second-cias, matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



Editorial 



s. 



PRESIDENT GOODELL. 

From all who have the interests of M. A. C. at 
heart come inquiries as to the health of our dear 
President. We are glad to state at this time that he 
is slowly improving and is able to sit up a few hours 
each day. It will be at least six weeks, however, 
before he can leave for the south. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



How long before the college may have a trophy 
room in some of the future buildings is an uncertainty. 
But be it sooner or later. Is It too early now to estab- 
lish a custom long since practiced In other colleges ; 
namely, that the managements of the athletic teams 
and of the college Signal should leave with the col- 
lege a framed photograph in remembrance of such 
association ? Many of our teams have been such that 
the college might be proud of, and we should feel 
under an obligation to do that little for the institution. 
In looking over the photographs left In the reading 



room or library during the past few years one sees 
very few of the athletic teams represented. Of th- 
football teams during the past four years we should 
certainly feel proud and yet in remembrance of them 
we have little except a temporary list of '01 victories 
printed upon the backstop and on photograph. Can 
this year's football management not begin the good 
work by leaving with the college a framed photograph 
of the team ? And hereafter it should be the duty of 
the reading room association to see that such a custom 
is adhered to by subsequent teams. 



It Is reported that the bill for the college appropria- 
tions, which is to be brought before the house Friday 
of this week Is going to be fought against by the far- 
mers of the state. The total sum asked for this year 
is $1 16,000, and it is intended to use it largely for 
the construction of new buildings. A new Horticul- 
tural Laboratory, a Botanical Laboratory, an Ento- 
mological Laboratory, and a new greenhouse are 
among the things asked for. It Is hard to compre- 
hend that opposition should come from the farmers of 






74 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



75 




the state, the very ones who would receive the bene- 
fit from the investment, and the ones to whom the 
college always looks for support. The main point in 
the opposition is that the college, by selling its produce 
at a low price, injures the local farmers, gardeners 
and dairymen. If the college happens to sell a few 
ears of sweet corn in Hadley at eighty cents a hun- 
dred when the local gardener is getting two dollars a 
hundred, is the agricultural interest of the state 
injured thereby ? The college has been founded here 
for the advancement of knowledge in agriculture and 
the kindred arts. If agriculture has already reached 
the summit of perfection in the state, or if the college 
is no longer capable of promoting agricultural knowl- 
edge, then, indeed, is the usefulness of the college 
gone by, and the farmers do well to stop a further 
expenditure upon It. But we have seen certain 
methods practiced in this very state so lately, and 
have our own college instruction so vividly in mind 
that we are sure this is not the case. Granted that 
the local man is Injured by the college, shall we do 
away with the college ? The college does not cater 
to any particular market, and it makes no difference 
to it whether the produce goes to a man in Spring- 
field, Boston, New York or Amherst. In the past, on 
account of its superior quality, the produce has been 
eagerly bought up by the local dealers, and the many 
have been benefitted, while a few may have been 
Injured by the college. Even if every potato and 
turnip from the farm, every peach and apple from the 
orchard and every rose and carnation from the green- 
house had to be utterly destroyed as soon as it 
reach-.u perfection, still the work done by the college 
would be worth the cost to the state. And if the col- 
lege is to carry on its work, more equipment Is abso- 
lutely necessary. There is hardly another college in 
the land where there is no class-room large enough 
to accommodate the whole of a single class. As the 
matter stands now the college has asked for nowhere 
near enough funds. The trustees have been very 
conservative and very timid in their requests. What 
is a hundred thousand dollars when we consider the 
wealth of the state guarded over by the college and 
the high ideals which are held before us? 



Through the winter and spring months football 
enthusiasts who have the interests of the game at 



heart occasionally get together and discuss plans for 
making the college game more ideal. Every year 
new rules come in, old ones go out ; and every year 
new difficulties arise to contend with as soon as pre- 
vious ones have been overcome. The question of 
cleanliness in the game is now foremost in the grid- 
iron world, and we hear suggestions from every quar- 
ter relating to it. To deal with it is beyond the 
powers of one man or two. We see the " dirty ' 
playing every year and in nearly every contest. 
Sometimes it is in the open, and sometimes in the 
pile out of sight of officials and spectators. We have 
seen four or five players co-operate In their endeavers 
to put a star opponent out of the game simply because 
of his reputation as a good man. This end Is 
undoubtedly accomplished and the tide of battle 
turned. Victory seems to be the all inspiring end 
and purpose of all that is good and bad in the game. 
Victory at any price ! Officials favoring this team or 
that team overlook the "dirty" work of their favorites. 
Their attention is constantly called to the underhand 
work of this or that player but called in vain. We 
have seen open fistic matches time and time again in 
games, often seeing both men ruled out of the game. 
The captains get together and agree to let those men 
go back into the game. The thing continues and 
before the game has ended the common idea of 
" fight " has been infused into nearly every player on 
both teams, and instead of football we see pugilism. 
If the men comprising the teams are not gentlemen 
they must remember that among the spectators there 
are bound to be some. These have paid their admis- 
sion with the rest, and as football has been advertised 
they expect to see it in return for their money. If 
they do not, why should team managers expect to sell 
them tickets to future games ? There Is a class 
which delights in seeing " slugging " matches in foot- 
ball rather than gentlemanly sport and this element 
seems to get the most satisfaction out of their price 
of admission. The player who can put his opponent 
out of the game is the hero, regardless of his football 
ability ! In fact modern coaches often drill their men 
into methods of putting their opponents out and into 
disregarding rules. They want to get the 'varsity to 
show " fight " in their matches. To be aggressive 
doesn't necessarily mean to " kill " the opposing men. 
We like to see ginger and go in every team ; but 



these pugilistic encounters are uncalled for. The 
scrub team gets the benefit of this coaching all the 
season. If the scrub man is larger and a better 
fighter than his 'varsity opponent he has nothing to 
fear even though he doesn't know as much football. 
But how many such men can be found in the scrub of 
a small college ? Can we blame men for refusing to 
turn out every afternoon to be battered and "slugged" 
by their mates who are often double their weight ? 
It must be anything but inspiring for these scrub men. 
Often enmities arise which otherwise never occur 
from such tactics. If a man is "slugged" and has the 
right stuff in him he will « slug " back, it is expected, 
but if the thing is allowed to go on, how much football 
is actually played by men pursuing these methods ? 
It is difficult enough for any man to remember the 
signals, and get his man out of the way without being 
compelled to dodge several pairs of well aimed fists 
at the same time. The man who hits back is not to 
blame. It is rather the man who initiates the " dirty " 
work. Right men as officials will find the man out 
and put him on the side lines but these •• right men " 
as officials are hard to find. College athletics are 
perhaps the greatest advertising medium institutions 
have. Why not make them clean and businesslike ? 
It doesn't appear to be so much a question of rules 
etc. as it does of getting " right men " as officials. 
Every institution which Is represented on the gridiron 
should combine in an effort to down this " rowdyism." 
It is something which crops out In every college 
game, and M. A. C. teams should endeavor to down 
such a spirit whenever and wherever it shows a ten- 
dency to arise. For the good name of the college 
keep our athletics clean. 



BASKETBALL. 

Newport Naval Reserves, 20 ; M. A. C. 15. 

Jan. 21 the basketball team went to Newport, and 
played the strong Naval Reserve team. The game 
was without doubt the fastest played so far this season 
jy Massachusetts. The first half of play was very 
even, and when time was called the score stood 10 
6 In favor of the Reserves. In the second, Massa- 
chusetts started with a rush and scored seven points. 



Shortly after this, however, Allen threw two goals in 
succession, and this example was followed by Maher 
and Beattie. 

For the Reserves, Allen and Millington excelled, 
while Hunt, Gillett and Ingham played a fast game 
for Massachusetts. The work of the officials was 
highly commendable. Lineup: 



NAVAL RESERVES. 

Allen. 1. f. 
Millington. 1. f. 
Maher, c. 
Nelson, r. b., 
Beattie. 1, b., 

Goals from field — Allen 4 
Ingham 2, Gillett 2. Hunt 
Hunt. Referee — McLean of Newport 
M. A. C. Time — Two 20 min. halves. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

I. b.. Hunt 

r. b., Peters 

c. Gillett 

I. f.. Ingham 

r. f., Cobb 

Millington 2, Maher. Beattie, 

3. Goals from foul — Allen 4, 

Umpire — Gardner. 



Brown, 51 ; Massachusetts, 14. 

The day following the Newport game the basket- 
ball team went to Providence and met the fast Brown 
five. The Brown team played a very fast game, and 
together with the fact of the hard game the night be- 
fore our team was unable to do much scoring. 

Backle and Dewolf excelled for Brown, while 
Ingham and Gillett did good work for M. A. C. 
Line up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. b., Taylor, Peters 

1. b., Hunt 

c. Gillett 

r. f.. Ingham 

1. f.. Cobb 




BROWN. 

Dewolf, I. f. 

Rackle. r. f. 

Pryor (Elrod). Harding, c. 

Ingalls. 1. b., 

Reynolds, Swartz, r. b., 

Goals from floor— Dewolf 7, Rackle 7. Ingalls 6. Harding 

2, Schwartz. Ingham 3, Gillett 2. Goals from fouls. Pryor 

3, Rackle 2, Hunt 2. M. A. C. awarded one point for infer- 
ence, Referee — Schwaffielf of Brown. Umpire, Cardner 
of M, A. C. Time— Two 20 min. halves. 

NOTES. 

Trinity cancelled her game scheduled for Jan. 28 
at the Drill Hall on only one day's notice, finding that 
the game interfered with examinations 

Manager Gardner has made arrangements for a 
game with the Northampton Y. M. C. A , to be 
played to-night at the Drill Hall. 



BASEBALL. 

In a month's time, or six weeks at the most, the 
candidates for the baseball team will, in all probabil- 
ity, be called out. It has been customary in former 




7 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




years to work out in the Drill Hall until the weather 
permitted out-door practice. Up to the present time 
there has been perhaps more work done for the bene- 
fit of the team than in any previous years. The best 
schedule that the college has ever had is to be played. 
When such teams as Brown, Exeter and the Univer- 
sity of Rochester are being added to our list, it is 
quite evident that we are making rapid strides in the 
baseball world. 

In order to uphold the reputation established by our 
football team, it is unnecessary to say that good, hard, 
conscientious work has to be done. The Freshman 
class, especially, is looked to for considerable aid in 
this work. Don't think. Freshmen, that because 
there are old men on the team that it means that you 
have no chance to make it. If you are capable, 
there is a place for you. This idea has been preva- 
lent in former years, but it is an erroneous one. Even 
if you shouldn't make the team your first year, you 
have three more. So come out and help and do all 
In your power to make the season a success, and to 
place our college in a position which our alumni and 
student body will be able to point to with pride. The 
following is the schedule : 

April 18. Wesleyan at Middletown. 
Holy Cross at Worcester. 
Colby at Amherst. 
Trinity at Hartford. 
Exeter at Exeter. 
New Hampshire at Amherst. 
University of Rochester at Amherst. 
S. T. S. at Amherst. 
Williams at Williamstown. 
Andover at Andover. 
New Hampshire at Durham. 
Colby at Watervllle. 
S. T. S. at Springfield. 
Brown at Providence. 




May 



29. 

1. 

3. 

6. 
10. 
13. 



June 



20. 
22. 
23. 
24. 

3. 

7. 



THE BEGONIA. 

The begonia in one of its various forms is of great 
value to both the amateur and the commercial 
grower. The amateur should hold it in high esteem 
because of Its easy propagation and fitness for home 
decoration, or to give beauty and distinction to the 
garden. In the hands of the commercial man it 



yields flowers during the fall and Christmas seasons, 
thus affording him a good plant for decorative pur- 
poses, or an attractive pot-plant for the trade. 

Most people think that there are but few begonias, 
perhaps four or five, but the fact is, there are three 
great classes and many kinds in each class. The first 
class, to which belong the fibrous-rooted or winter 
flowering ones, is of the greatest value for its members 
blossom in-doors in the fall and early winter, produc- 
ing a profusion of blooms at a time when flowers are 
at a premium. In this class are Metalllca, Semper- 
florens, Nigricans. Thurstoriis. Weltoniensis, Incar- 
nata, Glorie de Lorraine, and a number of others, fine 
examples of which are found in our own greenhouses. 
All are easy of propagation making them esspecially 
useful as window plants. Especially fine is Incarnata, 
which blossoms at Christmas, and Glorie de Lorraine 
the most popular kind at present. In the summer-flow- 
ered or tubrous rooted, the second class, we have the 
material with which to decorate the greenhouse in 
early summer, they are also popular for garden plant- 
ing. These two classes alone produce a succession 
of flowers the year round. The third class comprises 
the Rex begonias so much sought after for decorative 
purposes, and admired for their great variety of fancy 
leaves. 

The begonia is easy of propagation, growing quickly 
from stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, or division of the 
rhizomes (creeping woody stems), as well as from 
seeds. The essentials to its culture are a tempera- 
ture of 50° to 55° at night,— 10° to 15° higher during 
bright days, — and shading ; for while the begonia 
delights in a strong light it will not stand direct rays 
of the sun. The plants are started in March or April, 
and potted off when well rooted. From now on. 
during the summer all the care necessary is to shift 
them to larger pots as they grow, pinch back exces- 
sive growth, and protect from the sun. 

And one word more. After this sketch, to bring 

the matter to your attention, make up your mind to 

pay a visit to the greenhouses and see for yourself the 

gorgeous and changing array of color and variation 

that presents itself. This is the time to become 

acquainted with our common plants of which, in this 

one at least, we have a fine collection, worthy of 

your attention. 

A., '05. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




College N°t*$. 



— The invitations for the prom, have at last arrived! 

— Our second semester begins on Thursday, Feb. 9. 

— Fullam, ex-'08. has entered the New Hampshire 
State College. 

— A committee consisting of Taylor.Yeaw and Hatch 
has been elected to construct the design of and present 
plans for the senior class bed. 

— The dairy school class has elected these officers: 
President, W. H. Ranney ; vice-president. A, E. 
James ; secretary and treasurer, R. S. Fabian. 

— At the annual meeting of the trustees of the col- 
lege held in Boston, a committee was appointed to 
look into the matter of getting an athletic field. 

— J. F. Lyman attended the annual alumni dinner 
held at the American Hotel in Boston last Friday 
evening, going as the representative of the Signal. 

— Prof. F. A. Waugh visited Seaford, Del. lately, 
where he delivered two lectures before the Peninsular 
Agricultural society on " Horticultural Education " 
and "Grafting." 

— W. P. Brooks, acting president, and G. E. Stone 
were in Boston last week for the purpose of consulting 
the committees of the Legislature In regard to the 
college appropriation. 

— The library is trying to get a complete collection 
of Farmers' Almanacs and all almanacs of an agricul- 
tural nature. Anyone would confer a favor on the 
college by presenting to the library any old copies 
which he may have. 

— At a joint meeting of the senate and a committee 
from the faculty it has been decided to devote one 
week to the semester examinations, instead of three 
days as formerly. They will begin on Thursday morn- 
ing and end the following Wednesday. 

—Lieut. William H. Armstrong, '99, has been 
ordered to Washington with a battalion of a Porto 
Rico regiment and the regimental band to participate 
In the inaugural celebration. The battalion is expected 
to arrive In New York about the last of February. 

— Prof. C. A Goessmann has published bulletin 
No. 102, which contains 40 pages of the results of the 
year's work. It contains analyses of manurial sub- 



stances forwarded for examination, analyses of ferti- 
lizers collected in the general market, and the market 
value of fertilizers. 

— Last Thursday evening the Y. M. C. A. was 
addressed by Mr. Rasmussen from Iowa State College, 
who is Instructor of dairying in the short course. He 
gave a very interesting sketch of the methods and 
accomplishments of the Y. M. C. A. as conducted In 
his western college 

—George H. Moses, secretary of the New Hamp- 
shire forestry commission, addressed the horticultural 
seminar at the college on Thursday evening, Jan. 19. 
his subject being, " New Hampshite Out of Doors." 
The lecture was illustrated by the most picturesque set 
of stereopticon views seen at the college for a long 
time. 

— At a meeting of the senior class the following 
men were elected for the class day exercises: Ivy 
poet, G. H. Allen; class orator, F. L. Yeaw ; class 
ode, G. N. Willis ; campus orator, H. L. Barnes ; 
pipe orator. T. F. Hunt; hatchet orator. Bertram 
Tupper. The writing of the class song was left open 
to competition among certain members of the class. 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

Another turning point !n our college life Is at hand. 
A feeling of gloominess, of sad melancholy, of vague, 
indefinite longings and misgivings will soon take pos- 
session of us. The pleasant "hello" or "good 
morning " which is so natural among us. will have a 
touch of indeflnitness and a lack of spontaneous out- 
bursting of general good fellowship. But such a con- 
dition has Its benefits. Life Is not all one " grand 
sweet song" as many wish it were. The days of 
extra work and greater trouble only make our 
leisure moments the more appreciated. The majority 
who remain with us next semester will be more genial 
and open hearted, and a feeling of happiness, of satis- 
faction, and of reward well merited will soon again 
reign supreme. 

***** 

A student prominent In athletics, in one of the col- 
leges of Massachusetts became interested in M. A. C. 
and wished to become a student here. A few days 
ago he wrote to one of the seniors asking if work, 
such as a waiter In the dining hall or janitor of some 







78 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



79 



dormitory, could be obtained for him. This college 
needs that man as we need and want fifty more just 
like him. But what could this senior offer? He 
knows that the Athletic association cannot offer him 
financial aid outright as do other college athletic asso- 
ciations ; he knows that all the available positions are 
now occupied, and what, Is more, he knows that some 
of theee men have no right to hold their positions to 
the exclusion of worthier men. He Is compelled to 
write back asking for a few days to see what can be 
done. This means without a doubt that another good 
athlete is lost to M. A. C. To the Autocrat it seems 
that there must be some one here who is now receiv- 
ing help from the college in some way or other who 
would feel that this man needs the help more than 
he himself does. What greater good could he do for 
his Alma Mater than to allow this man to step into 
his place ! It is such a feeling of sacrifice that must 
be felt here if we are to continue to keep our college 
athletics in the estimation they now hold. 

***** 
The Autocrat had occasion during the past week to 
refer to one of the monthly magazines for a little 
information. Accordingly he stepped into the reading 
room to accomplish his object. The magazine was 
not there. A short inspection revealed the fact that 
there were only three magazines in the entire room. 
The Autocrat became interested and attempted to 
Iocs ' these magazines by a sort of impromptu inspec- 
tion of the student's rooms. He succeeded in locat- 
ing eight of the missing articles : three in a senior's 
room, two in a junior's and the others were in as 
many different freshmen's rooms. The Autocrat will 
not attempt to moralize but he hopes that he is not 
writing in vain. 



THE INVENTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF 
PRINTING. 

Printing has been defined to be the act, art or 
practice of impressing letters or figures on paper, 
cloth, or other material. 

The art of printing existed long before the fifteenth 
century although it is not until then that credit is given 
for its Invention. There is reason to believe that 
William the Conqueror and other mediaeval princes 
and kings had their monograms cut on blocks of wood 
or metal in order to impress them on their charters, 



and the manuscrips of the twelfth century show initials 
which on acconnt of their uniformity are believed to 
have been impressed by means of stamps or dies. 

Block printing and printing from movable types can 
be traced as far back as the sixth century when the 
founder of one of the old Chinese dynasties was said to 
have had the remains of the classical books engraved on 
wood. In Japan the earliest example of block-print- 
ing dates from the period 163-770 when the Empress 
Shiyon-tokn, in pursuance of a vow. had one million 
toy pagodas made for distribution among the Buddhist 
temples and monasteries, each of which was to con- 
tain a selection from scriptures printed on a slip of 
paper about eighteen inches in length and two in width, 
which was rolled up and deposited in the body of the 
pagoda under the spire. 

To the Koreans is attributed the invention of copper 
types in the beginning of the fifteenth century ; and an 
inspection of the books bearing the dates of that period 
seems to show that they used such types even if they 
did not invent them. In Europe, as late as the second 
half of the fourteenth century every book and every 
public and private document was written by hand ; all 
figures and pictures, even playing cards and images of 
saints were drawn with the pen or painted with a brush. 
This writing and illumination by hand reached a very 
high state of perfection as its practise continued ; and 
it was when this was at its highest state of perfection 
that the art of printing from wooden blocks was intro- 
duced into Europe. 

There is considerable discussion as to who was the 
real inventor of printing: Pamfllo Castaldi. John 
Guttenberg and Sourens Coster have all been asserted 
as the inventors of the art. Many text -books, I believe, 
give Guttenberg the credit, but the Encyclopedia 
Brittanica asserts very strongly the claims of Sourens 
Coster and claims that he invented printing in the 
year 1445 at Harlem. But belt as it may. it Is 
certain the invention took place about this time and 
since then its Influence and importance has materially 
affected every civilized nation on the globe. During 
the first half century of printing a good many printers 
distinguished themselves by the beauty, excellence 
and literary value of their productions. The demand 
for books increased and with it came a reduction in 
their prices. Before this time books were a luxury 
that could be only indulged in by the wealthy, but by 



the invention of printing in a short time the prices of 
books became so low that even the poorest could pur- 
chase them. 

The first Dress of which we have any record is the 
old so-called " Wine Press " invented and operated by 
John Guttenberg. It was worked by hand and printed 
fifty impressions an hour : by the aid of this Gutten- 
berg printed his first Bible. This was followed in 
1620 by the Blaew, and its capacity was one hundred 
and fifty impressions an hour. In the latter half of 
the eighteenth century both the Stanhope and the 
Franklin presses were invented, both being great 
improvements over the preceding machines. The 
Stanhope was the first press made entirely of iron. 
The Franklin was built and operated by the great 
statesman and philosopher which gave the press its 
name, and is now treasured in the patent office at 
Washington as one of the choicest relics of the nation. 
In 1817 George Clymer invented the Columbian and 
this was followed in 1829 by the Washington, the last 
and best of the representative hand presses. This 
press could turn out three hundred impressions an 
hour, considered at that time a wonderful achievement. 

The next improvement worthy of note that took 
place was the invention of the treadle — one of vast 
importance in the way of labor saving appliances 
whereby foot power was utilized and the hands were 
left free for other use than giving power. The first 
treadle press was built by Daniel Treadwell in 1820 ; 
from that time on the hand presses lost their import- 
ance, and improvements were constantly being made 
to better these treadle presses. At present they are 
a wonderful machine and turn out work with great 
neatness and rapidity. These "jobbers " as they are 
called, In every office of any importance are run by 
power and can print anywhere from one to three 
thousand impressions an hour. 

Toward the end of the eighteenth century it was 
already felt the hand press would be much to slow for 
the wants of the craft, and inventors began to devise 
presses to be moved by power. The first invention 
along this line was made by William Nicholson an 
Englishman, in 1790, but it was not a success. In 
1804 Friedrick Honig, a printer of Saxony, began to 
devise improvements in printing presses and after a 
number of failures succeeded In 1814 in building the 
first successful cylinder press. The London Times 



immediately adopted it and their issue on November 
28th of that year informed their readers that they were 
reading for the first time a sheet printed by steam. 
He soon after made a machine for printing both sides 
of a sheet, which was nothing more than two presses 
combined in one, the paper being carried from one to 
the other by s shaped tapes. The next improver of 
presses was a Mr. Cowper and his most important 
work was the invention of the inking table. Before 
this time the inking arrangement of the press was very 
poor and Cowper's invention did away with much of 
this difficulty. In 1838 a faster press was built for 
the Times on the principle that he had originated and 
it struck off 6200 copies an hour. This press worked 
daily for more than ten years. It was reserved for an 
American, however, to make the first successful type- 
revolving press. 

Richard Marsh Hoe of New York was the man. 
and today he Is regarded as one of the greatest 
inventors that the world ever produced. His first 
great invention was his ten-cylinder press that turned 
out 15000 impressions an hour. It was first installed 
by the Philadelphia Public Ledger and after being 
profitably worked there was adopted by the leading 
newspapers of New York and London. Hoe's great- 
est work, however, was the invention, in 1853. of the 
Web perfecting press, by which 50.000 eight-paged 
newspapers could be printed, folded and pasted, all in 
an hour. Under the head of R. Hoe & Co. improve- 
ments steadily went on. Before his death in 1888 it 
was possible to turn out as many twelve-paged papers 
in an hour, and at the present time fully 100,000 
fourteen paged newspapers can be turned out in that 
time. It is certainly wonderful to think that our 
present newspaper is printed with such rapidity, but 
still more wonderful is it to see it done, and one's 
spare time could not be better improved than to make 
a round of some of our newspaper homes, and watch 
the preparation of the publication. P., '08. 



A NIGHT ADVENTURE. 

Late one bright October afternoon, two boys might 
have been seen to emerge from one of the streets of 
a New England village, and. leaving the last house 
behind them, to make their way across the broad 
fields of a neighboring farm. 

The older was a staunchly built lad of about nine- 



8o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



teen summers, of average height, with square should- 
ers of medium breadth, well-knit limbs and features 
of a fine mold. His hair was long and straight, fall- 
ing about his neck, but held back from a full, high 
forehead by a cap of mlnkskin. Two clear, blue 
eyes, which could pierce a guilty soul like cold steel, 
now carelessly scanned the bare and desolate land- 
scape. He seemed to absorb everything at a glance 
and possessed the air of one who loved Nature for 
Nature's sake, who understood the unceasing struggle 
of life and acknowledged the law of •• the survival of 
the fittest," who felt the suffering of the downtrodden 
and suffered with them. 

The other, of slighter build, with a broad, high 
forehead and light, curly hair (one lock of which fell 
below his hunting cap), eyes of dreamy blue and a firm 
set mouth which drooped a little at the corners, strode 
at the side, and a little to the rear of his companion. 
He was hardly more than sixteen, and apparently by 
his position and silence, reposed full confidence in his 
friend and leader. 

Both were rigged in hunting shirt, canvas coat and 
trousers and buckskin leggins fastened with thongs. 
Moccasins of the same material as the last and mink- 
skin caps completed their attire, while each carried on 
his shoulder a double-barreled shot-gun. They were 
evidently bent on some adventure, which would take 
them far into the night. 

"Saw that woodchuck I shot yesterday, didn't 
you asked the older, interrupting the silence for 
the first time, while crossing the field. " Yes. he 
was a beauty; how'd you get him?" replied the 
younger. - Well, you see it was this way. Father 
had some fine peas, over in the five-acre lot, last 
summer, and that poor woodchuck came 'round to 
see what they tasted like. I guess he'd never seen 
any before, for he just pitched in and ate the biggest 
part of them. But couldn' find his hole anywhere, 
'though we hunted all over. So father set me looking 
for him the other day and, as luck would have it, I 
spied him sitting on a ridge in the middle of where 
the peas were, trying to satisfy his hunger thinking of 
last summer. I had the wind of him and his back 
was toward me too, so I just up and let him have it. 
It keeled him clear over. I was kind of sorry, though 
after — sh ! 
They had reached the stone-wall which separated 



the field from the low growth of birches and maples, 
the border to the forest beyond. It seemed to be the 
mutual principal, not to speak aloud while in the 
woods, for, leaping the wall with nimble bound, they 
entered a wood-road which skirted it, (the wall) at 
this point, and with lighter step took up the march . 
again without a word. The elder set the pace and 
his companion followed in his footsteps. The road 
ended shortly in a clearing, but crossing this, the boys 
struck into a narrow and winding trail on the farther 
side. Through thickets and under lofty pines this led 
them, now along a watercourse, crossing and recros- 
sing it by natural log bridges, now by some placid 
lakelet, a panorama of the opposite shore, now by a 
babbling brook or a roaring torrent, swollen by the 
Autumn rains, and then again, opening out into full 
view of some larger lake, whose laughing ripples 

glinted in the slanting sunshine. 

***** 

It was twilight in the wilderness. Day and night 
were meeting swiftly but warily, as they always meet 
in the woods. The life of the sunshine came stealing 
westwards and downwards in the peace of a long day 
and a full stomach ; the night life began to stir in its 
coverts, eager, hungry, whining. Deep in a wild 
raspberry thicket a wood thrush rang his vesper bell 
softly ; from the mountain top a night hawk screamed 
back an answer, and came swooping down to earth, 
where the insects were rising in myriads. Near the 
thrush a striped chipmunk sat a-chunk-a-chunking 
his sleepy curiosity at a burned log which a bear had 
just torn open for red ants ; while down on the lake 
shore a cautious plash-plash told where a cow moose 
had come out of the alders with her calf to sup on the 
yellow lily roots and sip the freshest water. Every- 
where life was striving ; everywhere cries, calls, chirps, 
squeaks, rustlings, which only the wood-dweller 
knows how to interpret, broke in upon the twilight 
stillness. 

Three hours have passed away and the hunters 
(for we may truthfully call them such) have left twelve 
miles of a blazed trail behind them. It was quite 
dark now. and only with the greatest caution could 
they keep from brushing against the branches which 
reached out from either side as if to impede their 
progress. This condition of affairs did not last long, 
however. Suddenly emerging from a tangle of alders 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




81 



which almost disputed their right of way, they found 
themselves on the sandy shore of a forest lake. Skirt- 
ing its border for a short distance they came to a place, 
where a fringe of birches and alders nearly enclosed 
a small bay or cove and where, concealed from ordi- 
nary observation, a birch-bark canoe lay close to the 
shore. This was immediately drawn forth, and, depos- 
iting their guns in its bottom, they carefully entered 
and a few light dips of the paddle sent them far out 
onto the bosom of a wilderness lake. With stars 
alone for beacon-lights and the dim outline of the 
shore for a guide, they diligently plied their paddle 
and soon had the frail bark skimming merrily over 
the water's surface. There is no lack of practice in 
those still bodies and tireless arms, as the ashen blades 
quivered under the strain, striking the water as noise- 
lessly as leaves from the towering pines. 

***** 

It is midnight in the wilderness. The belated 
moon wheels slowly above the eastern ridge, where 
for a few minutes past a mighty pine and hundreds of 
pointed spruce tops have been standing out in inky 
blackness against the gray and brightening back- 
ground. The silver light steals swiftly down the ever- 
green tops, sending long black shadows creeping 
before it, and falls glistening and shimmering across 
the sleeping waters of a forest lake. No ripple breaks 
its polished surface ; no splash of muskrat or leaping 
trout sends its vibrations up into the still, frosty air ; 
no sound of beast or bird awakens the echoes of the 
silent forest. Nature seems dying, her life frozen out 
of her by the chill of the October night ; and no voice 
tells of her suffering. 

A moment ago the little lake lay all black and 
uniform, like a great well among the hills, with only 
glimmering star-points to reveal its surface. Now, 
down in a bay below a grassy point, where the dark 
shadows of the eastern shore reach almost across, 
a dark object is lying silent and motionless on the 
lake. Its side seems gray and uncertain above the 
water ; at either end is a dark mass, that in the 
increasing light takes the form of human head and 
shoulders. A bark canoe with two occupants Is 
before us ; but so still, so lifeless apparently, that till 
now we thought it part of the shore beyond. 

There is a movement in the stern. The profound 
stillness is suddenly broken by a frightful roar ; •* M-| 



wah-uh! M-waah-uh ! M-w-wa-a-a-a-a ! " The 
echoes rouse themselves swiftly, and rush away con- 
fused and broken to and fro across the lake. As they 
die away among the hills there is a sound from the 
canoe as If an animal were walking in shallow water. 
Splash, splash, splash, klop ! Then silence again, 
that is not dead, but listening. 

A half hour passes, but not for an instant does the 
listening tension of the lake relax. Then the loud 
bellow rings out again, startling us and the echoes, 
though we were listening for it. This time the ten- 
sion increases a hundred fold ; every nerve Is strained, 
every muscle ready. Hardly have the echoes been 
lost when from far up the ridges comes a deep, sud- 
den, ugly roar that penetrates the woods like a rifle 
shot. Again it comes, and nearer ! Down in the 
canoe a paddle blade touches the water noiselessly 
from the stern, and over the bow there is the glint of 
moonlight on a rifle barrel. The roar is now contin- 
uous on the summit of the last low ridge. Twigs 
crackle and branches snap. There is the thrashing 
of mighty antlers among the underbrush, the pounding 
of heavy hoofs upon the earth ; and straight down the 
great bull rushes like a tempest, nearer, nearer, till 
he bursts with tremendous crash through the last 
fringe of alders out on to the grassy point. And then 
the heavy boom of a rifle rolling across the startled 
lake. 



Alu 



mm. 



The " Prelims » will be given out directly 
after chapel, on Friday morning Feb. 9. If 
you Intend to come to the Prom, send In your 
name to some friend or to II. M. Bussell, 
before that date. 

ANNUAL DINNER OF THE MASSACHUSETTS CLUB. 

The annual dinner of the Massachusetts Alumni 
Club was held Friday evening. Jan. 27. at the New 
American House, Boston. The attendance was 
large, and it was a time of reunion in its truest sense. 
The absence of President Goodell was a cause of sor- 
row to all, and on the motion of Dr. Peters the best 
wishes and sympathy of the club were sent to him. 
President Bunker, of the Alumni association, had 
already sent to the president a box of choice flowers, 












82 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









«3 



which reached Amherst Friday evening, and which 
bore the words : 

" Raised by one of the boys. 
From all the boys. 
To the old boy." 

Officers for the coming year were elected : Presi- 
dent. Lemuel LeBrown Holmes, 72 ; secretary. F. 
W. Davis. '89 ; treasurer, W. A. Corse, "82 ; execu- 
tive committee. A. W. Kirkland. '84 ; Madison Bun- 
ker, '75 ; E F. Richardson. '87. 

The speakers of the evening were : Acting-Presi- 
dent Brooks, who spoke on the work and the needs of 
the college ; Mr. G. H. Martin, secretary of the state 
board of education and ex-officio member of the as- 
sociation ; Mr. J. L. Ellsworth, secretary of the state 
board of agriculture and also an ex-officio member of 
the club ; H. M. Howard. '91 ; H. J. Wheeler, '83 ; 
W. H. Bowker, 71 ; R. W. Morse, 02 ; S. F. How- 
ard, '94 : J. F. Lyman' "05. President Bunker spoke 
of the pleasure he had had in the service of the club, 
and pledged his heartiest support for the future, saying 
that whether the chief cook or merely a pot werstler, 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fashion *' 
and plenty of assortment .*. .". 

THAT'S US. 



Haynes & Co., 



Always Reliable. 



Springfirld, 



Mass 



Surprise PRIZES given away. 

to get the people to talk about bixlkrs' physical training in penmanship, the 
best method of instruction in the world— Saves 90 per cent, of time, etc. 

Merit Prizes, Surprize Prizes, Prize Prizes, Sure Prizes, Big Prizes, Little 
Prizes, Contingent Prize and other Prizes for little folks and big folks. Send 10c. 
for Business Penman, 12 Writing Mottoes, sample rapid Writing nkilled Bird 
Flourish, and full particulars. (1 Surprise Prize will be included, worth from 
10c. to a dollar, and a $10 Prize Prize goes with each 100th 10c. order— con- 
ditional.) 

Prof. G. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. 



he would gladly do anything for the good of the club 
or for his Alma Mater. 

The following were present: Trustee M. F. Dick- 
inson, Mr. J. L. Ellsworth and Mr. C. H. Martin, as 
guests ; W. H. Bowker, J. F. Fisher, R. W. Lyman, 

E. E. Thompson and W. C. Ware, 71 ; F. E. Kim- 
ball, 72 ; W. S. Leland and S. S. Warner, 73; J. 

F. Winchester, A. A. Southwick, Madison Bunker, 
P. M. Harwood and W. P. Brooks, 75 ; F. H. 
Tucker. 76 ; A. S. Hall, "80 ; A. Whitaker, Austin 
Peters and C. A. Bowman, '81 ; F. G. May, F. W. 
Jones, D. E. Perkins and W. A. Morse, '82 ; C. H. 
Preston. S. M. Holman and H. J. Wheeler, '83; F. 
H. Fowler, J. F. Meehanand J. M. Marsh. '87 ; H. 
P. Rogers, F. S. Cooley and H. C. Bliss. "88 ; J. R. 
Blair. G. A. Fuller. A. L. Miles, F. W. Davis. A. D. 
Copeland and B. L. Hartwell. *89 ; H. M. Howard, 
A. H. Sawyer, W. W. Gay, F. L. Arnold. M. A. Car- 
penter and Murray Ruggles, '91 ; H. M. Thomson 
and H, E. Crane, '92; L. H. Bacon, E. W. Morse. 
A. H. Kirkland, Lowell Manley, L. M. Barker and 
S. F. Howard. '94 ; H. L. Frost, D. C. Potter and 
Jasper Marsh, '95; H. W. Rawson, '96; C. A, 
Norton. '97 ; W. S. Fisher, '98 ; J. F. Lewis. '00 ; 
E. L. Macomber and Thomas Casey, '01 ; R. W. 
Morse. '02 ; A. F. Haffenraffer, '04, J. F. Lyman. 
'05. 

A paper circulated in the interest of athletics was 
heartily subscribed to, and many dollars were raised 
for the development of our teams. 

'90. — Josd M. H errero reported to have been killed 
in the Spanish War, recently wrote President Goodell 
that he is alive, and is at present In Havana, Cuba. 

'94. — P. E. Davis has purchased a large stock farm 
in Granby, Mass. and intends to run it as a hay farm. 

'97.— C. F. Palmer is teaching Biology at the Palo 
Alto High School and is also 'taking a post-graduate 
course at Leland Stanford university. Lately he sent 
on a large collection of liverworts and algae for use in 
the botanical laboratory here. 

'98. — Alexander Montgomery Jr. is writing a series 
of articles on the history of grafting roses which Is at 
present being printed in the Weekly Florists' Review. 

'98. — W. S. Fisher Is principal of the Grammar 
School, Danvers, Mass. 

'00. — J. E. Halligan is with the Cuban American 
Sugar Company still, but his address now isChaparra, 
Cuba. 

'00.— F. G. Stanley. Harvard Medical 1904, is 
practicing at Cambridge and Boston. 



Regals in Quarter Sizes 

Fit any foot. 

J. J. GARDNER, Agent, 

12 South College. 



UP.TO-DATB 



Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 



Amhkrst, Mass. 






W. M. SSABfl, '06. 



r. E. Shaw, '07. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 






AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 





8 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•01. J, B. Henry, Ann Arbor Law School. '04. Is 

with J. B. Day 50 State St., Hartford, Conn. 

'01. W. R. Pierson is taking an extended trip 

through the South and West. 

'02.— H. A. Paul recently spent a few days around 
college. 

'03.— E. B. Snell spent two or three days at college 
recently. 



RESOLUTIONS IN SYMPATHY. 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to take unto Himself 
the father of our beloved friend and brother. C. W. Carpen- 
ter, be it, 

Resowed. That we, the Gamma Delta chapter of the Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity, do hereby extend our heartfelt sympathy 
to him and his family in their bereavement, and further, be 

it. 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to him 
and his family, and that a copy of the same be published in 

the College Signal. 

E. H. Scott. 
A. H. M. Wood. 
J. R. Kelton. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 

The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Age * r<>r the celebrated Guyer Hats and A. B. Klrsch- 

baom & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN and H. P. GLOVES. 

SANDERSON <£ THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Hmberst Ibouse, 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK. Pmormimrom. 



On Tn Way Home 



STOP AT 



Johnson's 



for something to read on the way. 

BOOKS, PICTURES, STATIONERY. 

313-315 M«in Street, - Springfield, Mass. 







WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections mqide. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AM1IERST. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 15, 1905, 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Student* and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication! should be addressed. Collsgb Signal. Amherst. Mass. Thb Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until Its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Editor-in Chief. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. Business Manager. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES. 1 906. Assistant Business Manager. 
ALLEN NEWMAN SWAIN. 1905. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT, 1906. Intercollegiate. 

PERCY FREDERIC WILLIAMS. 1905, Department Notes. GEORGE HENRY CHAPMAN, 1906. Alumni Notes. 

ALBERT DAVIS TAYLOR. 1905. College Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS, 1907. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS, JR.. 1906. EDWIN DANIELS PHILBRICK, 1907, Athletics. 



Termai 91.00 per year in advance. Single Copiea, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 8»c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. S. Walker, Pres. Athletic Association. 

E. W. Newhall, Jr., Manager. Base-Ball Association. 

W. A. Munson, Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Sia Index. 

H. F. Thompson. Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manager • 

F. H. Kennedy. Manager. 

G. W. Patch, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



We should like to say, by way of reminder, that the 
competition for positions on the Signal Board soon 
closes. All those desiring to compete should have at 
least two articles before the present board not later 
than March 1. 



Several of those who were present at the hearing 
in the state house on Feb. 3, had the pleasure 
of meeting Mr. Pollard, the new trustee, for 
the first time. He is a genial sort of a man to meet 
and talk with. He wished to set at rest the fear, as 
stated In an earlier Issue of the Signal, that he was 
not interested in the college, simply because he was 
not a farmer or alumnus. He wanted it understood that 
he is on the board of trustees to work, and that he 
will do what he can for the good of the college. 



The hope expressed by Mr. Bowker last June that 
a memorial hall will be erected in the honor of Levi 



Stockbridge is one which we all ought to desire to see 
realized. From the standpoint of the need of the 
building there is much to be said. An agricultural 
college ought, most certainly, to have Its strictly agri- 
cultural interests most prominently to the front. In 
order to do this there should be a suitable building 
with class rooms, laboratories and a museum, con- 
taining agricultural specimens and models, which 
would demonstrate to the practical farmer or to a 
man unfamilar with agriculture, the interests for 
which the college stands and the work that Is being 
done by agricultural colleges. As we are now situ- 
ated we are an institution ridiculously short of class- 
room accomodations, and the need of a large central 
recitation hall is becoming very imperative and, we 
believe, absolutely necessary. The bills In the legis- 
lature this year will not bring us relief, as the new 
buildings asked for are for department use and none 
are located centrally on the campus. The depart- 
ments other than Entomology. Botany and Horticul- 
ture will have to struggle along as before with their 
present equipment. It would seem that a large reel- 



I 





86 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tation hall, known primarily as Agricultural Hall, but 
containing commodious class rooms for the use of 
other departments such as mathematics, English, 
languages, etc., would relieve a very crying need of 
the college, and open the way for better work along 
all lines of instruction. From the standpoint of 
honoring the memory of our ex-President, Levi 
Stockbridge, nothing need be said, for how could we 
better perpetuate his memory than by erecting a 
stately and magnificent building which would be the 
principal hall on the campus, the building that would 
stand most prominently for the college. 



a monument to Levi Stockbridge as much as to any 
other man in Massachusetts. Let us hope that some 
day there will be erected on the campus a statue to 
his memory, or better still, a building which shall be 
known as -Stockbridge Hall' for the agricultural 
department. 



A pamphlet, entitled, " A tribute to Levi Stock- 
bridge," has been recently issued by Mr. William H. 
Bowker of the class of 7 1 . The paper was read last 
June at the Memorial exercises at the Alumni dinner 
and was later published in the College and Alumni 
News. Probably there is no one in a better position 
to pay tribute to ex-President Stockbridge than is Mr. 
Bowker, for the relationship between the two men has 
been very close for many years. Mr. Bowker first 
knew him as an instructor and later when Prof. Stock- 
bridge had worked out his fertilizer formulas he 
turned them over to Mr. Bowker to carry on the man- 
ufacturing enterprise. Levi Stockbridge should be 
very dear to all students at M. A. C. as he is to all 
those of the older classes with whom he had personal 
contact, for it was he who took the lead and laid the 
foundations for our agricultural courses. As Mr. 
bowker says, "he had to blaze the way, without books 
and without chart, and how well he did it." The first 
money received by President Stockbridge from royal- 
ties for the use of his name in the fertilizer business 
was given for experimental work at Amherst, and this 
practically laid the foundation of the first experiment 
station to be established in this country in connection 
with an Agricultural college. Mr. Bowker pays high 
tribute to President Stockbridge for his strong manly 
character, his tender compassionate spirit, and his 
work as a teacher and scientific worker. The heart 
of any M. A. C. man cannot but be touched by read- 
ing of this man's character and of his work for our 
college, and we may well point with pride to a man 
like Levi Stockbridge. as one of the founders, as a 
professor, and later as a president of our college. 
Mr Bowker says of the college. •' It stands here today 



The bill asking the Legislature for $1 16.115 as an 
appropriation to the college came up before a commit- 
tee of that body on Friday, February 3. The hearing 
was well attended, several going from Amherst to 
Boston for that purpose. From the college there 
were : Acting president W. P. Brooks, Dr. H. T. 
Fernald, Dr. G. E. Stone. Prof. F. A. Waugh of the 
faculty, and Williams. Tompson. and Swain of the 

senior class. 

After calling the meeting to order, Mr. Gerrett, 
chairman of the committee, called on Mr. Gleason. 
president of the board of trustees, who introduced Mr. 
Warner, representing some interests at Northampton 
and vicinity. After the conclusion of a few remarks 
by Mr. Warner. Professor Brooks was called upon. 
He stated the needs of the college In a clear, concise 
manner, telling of the almost ridiculous manner In 
which some of the exercises had to be conducted, 
through lack of the proper room. In addition he said 
that a great many people in manufacturing centres 
thought it wrong that they were taxed for the college 
as they felt that It benefited only a small part of the 
population of the state, and that in distinctly rural dis- 
tricts. To disprove that. Professor Brooks read some 
figures as follows: Of the 178 undergraduates now in 
college, 1 18 were from towns and villages and 60 from 
cities. With regard to the occupation of the fathers, 
he pointed out the fact that 34% were farmers. 32.2% 
businessmen. 23.3 J wage-earners, 9-10% profes- 
sional men. 2.3% retired, and 1.3% government 

officials. 

Of those coming from cities, it was shown that a 
great many elect agricultural subjects ; as an example ; 
of the senior class of 31 . 28 have elected such subjects. 
After Professor Brooks. Mr. Sessions of the State 
Board of Agriculture spoke briefly on the use to which 
some of the now available funds had to be put. Then 
Professor Waugh. on being introduced, gave an out- 
line of what was needed in his department. $39,950 
being asked for a new horticultural building. Dr. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»7 



Stone presented his case, stating that he had been 
obliged to refuse 25 freshmen a course in Botany 
through lack of room. He asked for $35,800 in order 
to make an addition to the East Experiment Station. 
Dr. Fernald's department needs $2,000 for an addition 
to the entomological laboratory and for a new green- 
house in connection with the insectary to take the 
place of the •' hospital " now in existence. Among 
others called upon were : Mr. Wheeler, Mr. Draper, 
Mr. Ellis, Mr. Preston, Mr. Pollard, Mr. Ellsworth, 
Mr. Ladd and Mr. Norcross. each of whom said a few 
words appropriate to the occasion. 

Owing to the lack of time, caused by the convening 
of the senate at 12 30 p. m., the hearing was adjourned 
to some time early In March, when it will be continued 
in Amherst. 




BASKETBALL. 

Massachusetts, 37 ; Northampton Y. M. C. A., 5. 

Feb. 1 , the basketball team played the Northamp- 
ton Y. M, C. A. at the Drill Hall. Without doubt it 
was the fastest exhibition of the game seen at the 
Drill Hall so far this season. For the first seven 
minutes neither side scored. Then Gillett caged the 
ball and Hunt followed this example by scoring twice 
in rapid succession. The half ended with a score of 
14 to 1 in favor of M. A. C. 

In the second half Massachusetts ran away from the 
visitors. The game was remarkably free from rough- 
ness. Ingham, Peters and Whitmarsh excelled for 
Massachusetts. For the Northampton team R. Har- 
ris and Clapp played well. Line up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Ingham, 1. f. 

Cobb, Whitmarsh, r. f 

Gillett. c. 

Hunt, 1. b. 

Peters, r. b. 



NORTHAMPTON Y. M. C. A. 

r. b.. McKenzie (Birney) 

1. b.. Sias 

c, R. Harris 

r. f.. S. Harris 

I. f.. Clapp 



Score— M. A. C. 37. Northampton Y. M. C. A. 5. Baskets 
from floor— Ingham 7. Gillett 2. Hunt 5. Whitmarsh 3. Peters. 
R. Harris, Sias 1. Baskets from fouls— Hunt, R. Harris. 
Referee — Gardner. Timer— Hamburger. Time — two 20- 
minute halves. 

Massachusetts, 66 ; Connecticut A. C., 22. 

Feb. 4 in a fast game at the Drill Hall, M. A. C. 



defeated Connecticut Agricultural College by the 
score of 66 to 22. The game was one of the clean- 
est seen at Amherst this season. The visitors seemed 
at a loss during the first half, they being unaccustomed 
to playing on such a large floor. Gillett played a 
remarkable game for Massachusetts, caging 16 bas- 
kets during the game. Hunt and Ingham also 
excelled. For Connecticut Chapman played well. 
Line up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Ingham, 1. f. 

Cobb. Whitmarsh, r. f. 

Gillett. c. 

Hunt, 1. b. 

Peters, Chapman, r. b. 



CONNECTICUT A. C. 

r. b., Cornwall 

1. b., Tryon 

c, Chapman 

r. f., Basker 

1. f., Shurtleff 



Baskets from floor — Gillett 16. Ingham 8, Hunt 4, Cobb 2, 
Peters. Whitmarsh, Chapman, Cornwall 2. Tryon 2, Chap- 
man 4. Shurtleff 2, Barker. Referee — Gardner. Umpire — 
Hastings. Timer — Philbrick. Time — two 20-minute halves 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

The days of trial and work are over. We have 
once more, after a little interruption, settled down 
to our usual daily work. The seniors are now 
on the last road and this is the road that leads 
to fame if properly followed. They have begun 
their last work with the right spirit and we 
know that they will end in a blaze of glory. The 
juniors have escaped the fangs of the faculty and are 
now on the way to become seniors with their full 
number. Great credit is due to the sophomores for 
the way in which they have mastered the difficulties. 
The freshmen are still alive although a few faces will 
soon be missing from their numbers. All together 
the autocrat thinks that the difficulties have been 
well surmounted and in a way that we are all proud 
of. 

* * • * • 

The Junior Prom Is close at hand. In order to 
make this a success the juniors must have the 
co-operation and help of all. In the few days that 
remain let us all give our time and ideas to this 
which is the one event of the junior year. An 
excellent committee is at the head diligently 
working, and if the college as a body will help them 
during their last few days' work there can be no 
doubt but that the prom will be a grand success. 










88 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Colleg? N°**S- 



Clinton King, '07, was called home by the death 

of his father, a few days ago. 

— Lend the Juniors a helping hand in their prepara- 
tions for the Prom on Friday night ! 

— Taylor, '05, is instructing the Juniors of the 
mathematical department in mechanical drawing. 

The basketball team plays Andover at Andover and 

Tufts at Medford on Friday and Saturday evenings. 

— Major Anderson has been given charge of the 
Freshman class in Ancient History during the absence 
of President Goodell. 

—Prof. Charles H. Fernald who has been confined 
to his house with an attack of grip is out again and 
able to meet his classes. 

The date of the next informal dance has not 

been definitely decided upon, but is all probability It 
will be about the middle of March. 

The death of George Richardson, father of J. 

C. Richardson, ex-'05, brings much sorrow to the 
members of the senior class from which his son was 
called last fall. 

At a meeting of the Freshman class last week 

the following officers were elected : Barry, president ; 
Chapman, vice-president ; Allen, secretary and teas- 
urer ; Wheeler, class captain ; Chace. sergeant-at- 

arms. 

-The decorations for the Prom will be somewhat 
sir. liar to those of last year, while the music is to be 
placed at the southern end of the hall. The stream- 
ers are to radiate from the center and there will be 
two rows of small lights in place of one, as formerly. 

During a part of this semester there will be given 

a short course in forestry at the college which will be 
open to Seniors and members of the " short course." 
It will be under the direction of Alfred Ackerman, the 
state forester and a graduate of the Yale forestry 
school. 

A few members of the faculty and some of the 

trustees met with a committee from the legislature 
recently for a hearing in regard to the college appro- 
priation. They were favorably received and the pres- 
ent Indications are that the bill will receive a good 
report In the legislature. 



— Tompson, Swain and Williams of the Senior class 
attended the hearing given the trustees of the college 
by the House committee on Agriculture at the State 
House, Feb. 3. Swain was called upon, by the chair- 
man of the commitee and added a few words in sup- 
port of the bill from the student's standpoint. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



8g 



A STORM. 

It was a beautiful moonlight night in August. The day 
had been hot, but now the cool, refreshing breeze of 
the evening blew gently across the water, bearing the 
charm of the twilight on Its light wings, fragrant with 
the odor of hemlocks, cedar and pine. A canoe was 
gliding slowly across the beautiful mirror of the moun- 
tain lake, its two occupants enjoying the cool of the 
evening and the charm of the scenery. He was sit- 
ting in the bow, lazily dipping his paddle into the 
water, and she was reclining comfortably among the 
many cushions in the bottom of the canoe. They 
were both very quiet, drinking in the charm of the 
evening, which had cast its spell over them. 

" What a beautiful evening !" she said at last, sigh- 
ing with perfect contentment. 

••Yes," he replied, in a more matter of fact tone. 
" but it looks like rain before many hours. Already 
the clouds are scudding across the sky, and a black 
bank is rising in the west." 

She looked as he spoke to the west, and saw faint 
lightning playing back and forth across the horizon. 
Her gaze then wandered slowly around the shores of 
the lake. It lay in the bosom of a vast evergreen for- 
est, which cast dark shadows Into the still water. On 
the east rose three dark mountains, their jagged peaks 
showing out sharply in the bright moonlight as it 
streamed out from time to time from behind the gath- 
ering clouds. Away down at the other end of the 
lake she could see the flickering fires of their camp, 
situated in a beautiful grove of pines. Then they 
fell to watching the shadows of the clouds as they 
glided silently across the lake, and up the dark sides 
of the mountains, to disappear beyond. 

For a long time they paddled In silence. The 
quiet of the evening had stolen in upon them, and it 
seemed a desecration to break the perfect stillness of 
the night. There was a few minutes of dead calm, 
when the gentle breeze ceased to fan their cheeks. 
Then the lightning played with Increased activity 



across the western horizon, and the breeze sprang up 
with new freshness, and seemed to bring a slight chill 
with it. In the distance, the sharp crack of a rifle 
was heard, and the low baying of hounds told of a 
deer hunt in progress. Suddenly an owl began to 
hoot dismally in the trees bordering the nearby shore 
of the lake. The woman in the canoe started, and 
lifted herself on her elbow to look toward the hiding 
place of the dismal disturber, a look of annoyance 
coming over her face. But still he hooted, as if in 
derision, and she turned to look anxiously at the rising 
bank of clouds In the west. The lightning played 
faster and faster, and the dull roll of thunder in the 
far distance accompanied the melancholy forebodings 
of the owl. Down at the other end of the lake, their 
camp-fires burned cheerfully, and invitingly. She 
watched them flicker in the increasing darkness for a 
few minutes, and then said. " Let's return. It will be 
raining before we know it." 

But the spell of the growing wildness of the night 
was upon him, and he said, with the assurance of an 
old weather prophet, •• What's the hurry ? It won't 
rain for an hour yet." And so they paddled on in 
silence. The wind was rising rapidly, and the water 
was roughened by Its increased action. The trees 
began to sigh in the wind, and the moon was lost 
behind the thickening clouds. The lightning played 
faster and faster, and shot up into the sky overhead. 
The thunder was now an almost continuous roar, and 
came nearer and nearer, while through it all could be 
heard the loud baying of the hounds as they followed 
their prey. It seemed that the deer was making 
straight for the lake. The man in the canoe allowed 
it to drift in the wind, that they might get a possible 
glimpse of the hunt. The darkness was now intense. 
They could scarcely distinguish the shore line, though 
it was but forty yards away. The trees rocked vio- 
lently In the wind, and the water splashed angrily 
against the sides of the canoe. The owl gave one 
last dismal hoot, and fled to his snug hole in some old 
tree. The lightning was playing around them in daz- 
zling flashes. The man in the canoe glanced at the 
dark clouds overhead, looked at his watch, and turned 
the prow of the canoe toward the flickering campfires 
at the other end of the lake. There was no time to 
lose, and he set himself doggedly to work. 

He had taken but a few strokes when the dark 



form of the deer burst out of the bushes ahead, and 
leaped into the water. The deer seemed to be com- 
ing directly for the canoe, swimming with strained 
eagerness to escape the fast approaching hounds. 
The deer did not seem to observe them, and they 
could barely discern its panting head above the water, 
except when the lightning flashed overhead, and dis- 
covered its straining neck- and terrified eyes. 

From the eager shouts of the hunters, and the loud 
baying of the dogs, they knew that the hunters were 
close at hand. The elements seemed to await in sus- 
pense the killing of the deer. Suddenly two bright 
flashes sprang out of the bushes. At one report, the 
deer's head dropped Into the water. The other shot 
missed its mark, and ripped through the prow of the 
canoe, throwing out its occupants, and then the 
elements seemed to break loose. Flash after flash of 
lightning illuminated the lake, and the rain burst forth 
in torrents. The wind whipped the water into huge 
waves, and whistled triumphantly through the trees. 

The first flash of lightning revealed to the hunters 
their awful work, and with hoarse cries of dismay and 
terror they fled into the forest, trying to escape the 
awful sight which had burned Itself upon their minds. 

It seemed to the man that he would never reach the 
surface of the water again. How far down he had 
gone ! As his head burst out of the water, he looked 
around for the woman. She was swimming around 
the broken canoe, looking for him. •• Were you hurt?" 
he cried relieved to see her so cool and clear headed. 

•• No," she said, " Were you ? " 

•• Not that I know of," he replied. " Let's get in 
shore as soon as possible." 

" Where have the hunters gone ?" she asked. 

" Sneaked off, I guess," he replied. '• They proba - 
bly thought they had killed us." 

As they came out of the water on to the rocky shore 
they heard the faint sound of oarlocks down the lake. 
Their fellow campers had come In search of them, 
knowing that the frail canoe could not live long In such 
high water. They were soon in the boat, telling of their 
night's adventure, and going rapidly toward the cheer- 
ful camp-fires at the other end of the lake. 

But still the elements raged on. The lightning 
flashed almost continuously, and the thunder vibrated 
through the surrounding forest. The waves slapped 
the sides of the boat angrily, and the trees creaked 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



go 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



9i 







and groaned in the strong wind, bearing with it torrents 
of rain. It seemed as if nature was trying to reclaim 
the prey which had been so nearly hers, but now was 
lost. 



MERITS AND 



THE CLAMMER. 

Many people situated inland where sea food is not 
often seen do not know the methods employed to 
capture it or the life of the man whose work is on the 
sea in quest of it. 

Among the most popular sea dishes that are served 
at our summer resorts the clam is the favorite. Most 
of the well known beds are on the North Shore. 
There are a large number of men who are following 
the footsteps of their fathers and are clamming on 
the same flats. The clammer goes out in his boat 
with the tide. It may be at two o'clock on a cold 
winter's morning when the ice is on the river, or at 
night when he has to work by the light of a torch. 
When the flats are reached he casts the anchor.takes 
his basket and digger and begins work. He works out 
with the tide and when it turns he works inland until 
the flats are covered with water. Then he pulls in 
the anchor and starts home, trying to outrow or sail 
those who started ahead of him. 

At the slip he unloads his boat. If the tide is 
good he may have from six to eight baskets, some 
baskets being larger than others. Some fish dealers 
ha - the clams shipped to them in the shell, more so 
in summer time when many have clam bakes. If 
our clammer has an order like this to fill, his work Is 
nearly done, but if not he has the trouble of shocking 
or shelling them. This is done in shanties and sheds. 
A special knife is used, one strong enough to open the 
shell and sharp enough to cut off the neck. 

The only trick in the trade is that of soaking the 
clams in water. This increases the bulk and many 
dealers prefer the large soaked clams to small yellow 
ones. When he has shocked all the digging, he 
hunts up his fellows and spends the time discussing 
work, politics and shipping. A., '07. 



ATTENTION ALUMNI. 

Any alumnus wanting a 1 906 Index may have one 



sent on the receipt of one dollar, if he will send in 
name and address to F. H. Kennedy, M. A. C. 



DEFECTS OF COOPER AS A 
WRITER. 

In James Fennimore Cooper we see a man, upright, 
proud and fearless; one who, unlike most writers, 
had spent almost thirty years of his youth in travel- 
ing over land and sea. By so doing he was uncon- " 
sciously, though firmly, laying the foundations for the 
works of his later life, in which he was destined to be 
so successful. In spite of his many controversies, his 
works are more widely read than those of any other 
author upon this side of the Atlantic. They have been 
severely, and perhaps unjustly criticized by many 
writers of his time ; but now that the cloud, which over- 
hung his life has passed, he may receive more fair and 
just criticisms. Without doubt this man possessed 
many faults, these however, when we consider the 
quantity of good literature he has produced, are of 
minor importance. Between the years of 1 840 and 
1845 he wrote eleven books, among which are two of 
his best tales— '• The Pathfinder" and " The Deer- 
slayer." In addition to these he wrote many reviews, 
and articles of both a literary and an historical nature, 
besides being engaged in his standing quarrels with the 
press. These things ought certainly to be considered 
in forming a fair estimate of his literary career. 

First, and probably the gravest fault of Cooper's 
writings, lay In his character drawing, most noticeably 
in that of his women. As an illustration take those 
portrayed in " The Last of the Mohicans." Here are 
two girls pictured as capable of enduring the hardships 
of a life in the forest with blood-thirsty Indians every- 
where.and this would not have been proper had he given 
us living, and fearless women. The public, in reading 
a story of this kind, naturally looks for a ruddier life 
than that circulating In the veins of these timid and 
helpless beings. Could one Imagine two such girls 
leading this strenuous life ! On the contrary they 
would make excellent society models, or religious 
characters. (Those of his earlier tales could do 
nothing better than faint while his later ones show a 
marked improvement.) 

Again his men, as well as women, are carelessly 
drawn. The heroes are always asleep at critical 
moments and, when awake, are almost certain to follow 
the paths they ought to avoid. The conversation of 
both is utterly absurd. As a whole, the characters 
are not real living, talking persons. They act very 



unnaturally and often without sufficient motive. 

'Partly, if not wholly due to the rapidity with which 
he wrote, Cooper has never attained a beauty and per- 
fection of style. But this is not a serious mistake 
when we recollect that it is not for the style, but for 
the story that his novels are read. Writing as he did, 
seldom correcting the first paper, can it not be seen 
that many errors might easily have been incurred ? 
But aside from this, many, such as errors in construc- 
tion are imputed to clear ignorance, due to his crude 
training. Words are poorly chosen and invariably he 
uses " female " for woman ; also he often forgets which 
words are from antiquated English and which are 
classical, consequently writing the former and putting 
the latter in parenthesis to explain it. In scarcely 
one of his novels does he show a purely humorous 
strain, and in fact he shows a great lack of humor. 
It is found extremely difficult to point out a character 
strictly of this kind. Most of his humor comes at 
intervals when least expected, and then from those 
who are intended to be of a serious nature. In the 
introduction of characters and scenes, a lack of skill 
is also shown. Many times, near the end of a novel, 
a new character is introduced without sufficient 
reason or any explanation whatever. This fault is 
attributed to the fact that, being desirous of producing 
the main effect, he was inclined to neglect details. 
As proof of this lack of detail one may read " The 
Two Admirals." 

A third great defect of Cooper's lay in his tiresome, 
and lengthy introductions. Herein he possessed a 
strong tendency to moralize and dwell upon truths long 
ago accepted as axioms by the majority of people. 
He could boast of no such ability as Kipling or 
Stevenson of plunging directly into the midst of the 
excitement. Instead, he fills pages in attempting to 
bring the reader up to the scene. Nevertheless, after 
he has reached this point none excel in the interest 
and rapidity of narration. 

Now that we have considered his defects, many of 
which, it is true, seem great enough to ruin his reputa- 
tion as a writer to be just.we should consider the other 
side or his merits. And in forming a fair estimate of 
merits it is not to the poorest works that we go. but to 
those of the highest rank. These, without doubt, are 
his Sea Tales and the Leather Stocking series. It 
matters little as to the defects one may have pointed 



out ; in Cooper's best novels there is nothing contrary 
to the law, that a story shall be filled with permanent 
interest. 

His main strength lies in the description of scenes 
and the narration of events. In this department of 
the work he has no superior and very few equals. 
No writer has ever rivaled him in his pictures of 
vessels and their manoeuvres at sea. The reader is 
fairly carried away by his descriptions of storms and 
battle scenes. An old sailor listening to a passage 
from " The Pilot" rose from his seat and paced the 
floor in a frenzy of excitement, because of its reality. 
In the writing of Sea Tales he has far surpassed his 
contemporary. Walter Scott, from across the ocean, 
who was greatly handicapped by a lack of practical 
experience. Brought up in the country and serving 
for years on board a man-of-war, Cooper had an excel- 
lent foundation for a story of this type. In all proba- 
bility the best example of this class of novels is " The 
Pilot " in which the pictures are as real as if actually 
seen. Free from large or superfluous words, and 
affecting the reader as much as though he were one 
of the crew and not a mere spectator. Due to the 
success achieved in these he has been honored as the 
"Creator" of this class of literature. Professor 
Newcomer says " They are the nearest substitute for 
actual experience that art can give." Another illus- 
tration of the excellency with which scenes were 
portrayed is found in his pictures of Lake Ontario and 
its shores as described in •• The Pathfinder ;" Long- 
Tom Coffin in " The Pilot " Is without doubt one of 
Cooper's best drawn characters. 

The narrative power of Cooper we see to the best 
advantage In " The Last of the Mohicans," Here Is 
a masterpiece for rapidity of narration, seldom checked 
by descriptions. The plot Is weaved with admirable 
skill, and although the characters may seem lifeless, 
the reader's interest Is maintained by wondering what 
they are going to do next. Again in this department, 
of portrayal of action, as in the sea tales few can 
equal him. Nature, he takes as a painter, filling the 
imagination, and in so doing the picture becomes 
lasting. 

From the manner in which this man has triumphed 
over his defects, he is certainly worthy of the name 
of a great writer. Had he been capable of portray- 
ing character as skillfully as the rush of incidents, he 



9 2 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



93 



surely would have been In a class by himself. His 
best excellence, as was said, is found in his pictures 
of nature, forest, ocean and prairie, upon which no 
criticism can be offered. These seem to be the things 
he really liked and, that he might excel in these, he 
was willing to sacrifice the less important which, to 
him. was character drawing. 

Lastly, it is maintained by many that from Cooper's 
novels, people across the ocean obtained a false idea 
of America; they thought that Americans had noth- 
ing to do but clear forests and fight Indians. It is 
true ; they did have this idea. But why ? Simply 
because the other writers did not contribute their 
share to our literature, to supply the omissions. 
Neither is Cooper responsible for the " Yellow Backed 
Literature" which followed ; his people as a rule com- 
mitted no crimes without a reason and no boy could 
be excited by them as by a modern, low grade novel. 
Though prejudiced he might be, he always despised 
everything mean and low. As Balzac says " To read 
one of Cooper's novels after reading a common novel, 
is similar to going from a crowded room out into the 

freedom of the fresh, open air." 

A. D. T.. '05. 



VIOLET GROWING AS AN ADJUNCT OF 
MARKET GARDENING. 

For market gardeners who live near cities and have 
g'-enhouses or forcing houses an employment which 
Is >amunerative during the winter months is very 
desirable. From April until November the market 
gardener applies himself to the business of supplying 
the markets with garden produce while for the rest of 
the year he has to turn his attention in another 
direction. Different men do this in different ways 
which depend almost entirely upon their location and 
of course, their Inclination. The first thing for a man 
In this position to do Is to study his markets and his 
ability and facilities for catering to their wants. It 
does not pay him to grow market garden produce 
during the winter for the Southern states furnish this 
cheaper than It could be raised here under glass. 
This closes that avenue of employment for him. 
He cannot afford to let his greenhouses be idle for 
the greater part of the winter so he turns his attention 
in another direction. The employment desired Is 
one which will not interfere with the regular business. 



Last, but what is considered of most importance, it 
must pay well. An occupation which fills these con- 
ditions admirably is violet growing. This statement 
seems to be proved true by the practice of many 
market gardeners. 

The best way to show that the violet fills these, 
conditions is for one to understand its culture which 
will show the amount of labor required and the pay 

from it. 

The best authority on this is B. T. Galloway of the 
Division of Vegetable Pathology and Physiology. 
His book. " Violet Culture, " Is the best work on the 
subject at present. 

We will commence with the propagation of the 
violet. This is done ordinarily by division, that is 
dividing the large plants into several small ones, and 
by runners. The violet has much the same habit 
as the strawberry in this respect. These runners can 
be cut off from the mother plant and each good 
specimen, if properly cared for will give a plant. 
This dividing of the plants is done In Febuary and 
the divisions are started in sand and light loam. 
Great care should be exercised In the selection of 
these plants that no weak or diseased specimens are 
used, for violets are very susceptible to disease under 
unfavorable conditions. Care and cleanliness are two of 
the chief necessities in the successful culture of them. 
After the young plants have had a chance to send 
out a good root system they are transplanted to flats. 
These have been filled with soil composed of 3 parts 
rotted sod and good loam and 1 part well rotted cow 
manure. After transplanting the plants are left in 
the flats until they can be transplanted to the field, 
which is, In this locality, about the middle of April. 
Violet culture Interferes with market gardening at 
this time but the work Is not such that It will take 
much time. After the plants are In the fields they 
require the ordinary tillage of other farm crops, the 
chief factor being that of keeping the weeds down. 
In August the plants will commence to send out 
runners which must be kept cut off If a strong plant 
capable of bearing many blossoms is to be obtained. 
It is not necessary to take the plants Into the green- 
house until quite late In the fall. A frost does not 
Injure them In the least and within reasonable limits 
they need not be taken in until convenient. 

The soil used In the greenhouse should have a 



good deal of care and preparation. The more times 
it is handled over the better. The plants If properly 
cared for will begin flowering by the last of Novem- 
ber and continue until March. During this time the 
grower will reap the benefits of his labor in direct 
proportion to the amount of care he has put on his 
plants. In order to be successful the violet houses 
must be kept absolutely clean. Every diseased leaf 
and stem should be picked off as soon as it is seen 
and the soil must be kept well stirred and free from 
weeds. 

There are two general classes under cultivation, the 
single and double. The demand for one or the other 
varies according to the market. The most popular 
varieties of the double class are the Lady Hume 
Campbell and the Marie Louise. For the single the 
California and Prince of Wales are considered best. 

Of the doubles the Marie Louise is grown to a 
larger extent but is more susceptible to disease than 
the Campbell. 

A plant should average about 50 blossoms at least 
during the season, A good grower can demand an 
average price of $.60 per hundred throughout the 
season. This average can be raised by raising fancy 
stock. Galloway says, " The grower should not be 
content with less than 100 salable flowers per plant 
and his aim and effort should be to succeed in 
making every plant average this number. On the 
whole, it may be said that the income from 10,000 
plants grown in houses and handled properly should, 
year In and year out. average $5,600.00 while the 
total expenses should not exceed $1,500.00. This 
means an average yield of 75 flowers per plant and 
an average price of $.75 per 100 flowers. 

I have not gone Into a discussion of the details 
of violet growing, but have tried to give a general 
idea of It, and show how it proves to be a pleasant, 
profitable and comparitively easy employment for the 
average market gardener. 

T, '05. 



Dfp&r-tmfivt" /Sloths. 



Tojiro Tokoyama visited the college last week and 
was very much interested in the work of the various 
departments. He is the Agriculturist at Formosa and 
is at present making a careful inspection of the Agri- 



cultural colleges and experiment stations with a view 
of utilizing the information obtained for the advance- 
ment of agriculture in Japan and Formoa. Mr. 
Tokoyama was a student under Prof. W. p/ Brooks, 
now our acting president, at the Sapporo Agricultural 
college in Japan. Tha principle exports of Formosa 
are at present tea. sugar and camphor. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL. 

The Journal club met at the Insectary Saturday 
Feb 4 and listened to an Interesting account of the 
meeting of Economic Entomologists which was h±ld 
at Philadelphia in December. The account was given 
by Dr. H. T. Fernald. who also spoke about the Car- 
negie Museum at Pittsburg. 

Hooker, '99, has returned from Texas where he has 
been employed by the government In the Boll Weevil 
investigations. He is going to study the anatomy 
and histology of the weevil for the Department of Agri- 
culture at Washington. 

HORTICULTURAL. 

There are a number of experiments being made on 
methods of grafting fruit trees, especially those of the 
apple and plum. 

AH of the trees in the college woodlot have been 
felled which are suitable for lumber. About 100,000 
feet of valuable lumber has been sold. 

The tool house narrowly escaped serious damage 
by fire last week. Duringthe work In graftlng.a kettle 
of wax took fire in the grafting rooms which set fire to 
the surrounding woodwork. The kettle had only been 
left a few moments when Whipple returned to find 
the room full of smoke. He threw a mat over the 
flames which soon extinguished them. He was 
burned somewhat, but not seriously. 

Professor Waugh lectured Feb. 9, at Vergennes, 
Vt. on •• Some of the Problems of the Graft Union." 
He also lectured last Saturday before the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural society in Boston on •• Dwarf Fruit 
Trees." 

One hundred dozen fruit baskets of assorted sizes 
have been ordered from the West. These baskets 
are for marketing vegetables and the larger fruits. 

The cold grapery has been piped for a vegetable 
house. 

FLORICULTURAL. 
T. F. Hunt. '05. spoke before the Florlcultural 



94 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



division last week on the diseases of the violet. He 
dwelt chiefly on the leaf spot caused by Alternaria, 
stem rot caused by Thielavla. crown rots, nematodes 
and mold or leaf burn. 

F.L. Yeaw. '05. demonstrated the methods of fumi- 
gation by cyanide of potassium for the destruction of 
greenhouse pests without injury to the plants at the 
East Experiment Station recently. Many of the 
common Insects were taken from the Plant Houses and 

treated. 

R. P. Gay. '05, Is preparing a mushroom bed 
of a new and improved variety known as » Columbia." 
This work Is 1n connection with Mr Gay's thesis. 

Mr. Canning recently addressed the Holyoke Hor- 
ticultural society at Holyoke. His lecture was on 
•• Bulbs and Tuberous Rooted Plants." 
BOTANICAL. 
The collection of models of common varieties of 
edible and poisonous mushrooms which were exhibited 
at St. Louis were returned last week. Mrs. Stearns 
of Hartford, Conn., sister of Mrs. W. E. Strong of 
this town made the specimens. 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kiaks of Fashion ■ 
and plenty of assortment ••• 

THAT'S US. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 
SpniMoriKLD, Mass 




Surprise PRIZES given away. 

to get the people to talk about bixlebs' physical training in penmanship, the 
best method of instruction in the world-Saves 90 per cent, of time, etc. 

Merit Prizes, Surprize Prizes, Prize Prizes, Sure Prizes, Big Prizes, Little 
Prizes, Contingent Prize and other Prizes for little folks and big folks. Send 10c. 
for Business Penman, 12 Writing Mottoes, sample rapid Writing, skilled Bird 
Flourish, and full particulars. (1 Surprise Prize will be included, worth from 
10c. to a dollar, and a $10 Prize Prize goes with each 100th 10c. order-con- 

ditional) Prof. Q. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 





95 



DEPARTMENT OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 
Lyman, '05 and Austin, 'OH, leave for Rutland and 
Princeton respectively, this week to test cattle for the 
advanced registry. 



Alu 



mm. 



ATTENTION ALUMNI AND FORMER 
STUDENTS ! 

The Fourth Annual Meeting and Banquet of 
the Connecticut Valley Association of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College Alumni will he held 
in the Hotel Worthy, Springfield, Mass., Friday 
evening, Feb. 17th, at 7 o'clock. 

Let everyone make a special effort to attend as 
we hope to have 75 present. Fee f3, payable on 
or before Feb. 14, to H. D. Hemenway, Box 449, 
Hartford, Conn. 

'83. — Charles H. Preston was recently elected vice- 
president of the Danvers Savings Bank. His address 
is Hathome, Mass. 

•91. — Julio M. B. Ovalle has returned from Chili 
to spend a few days in Amherst, after which he will 
go to New York where he will open a commission 
house. 

'94._T. F. Keith of FItchburg, will spend the 
remainder of the winter south. While there he 
expects to spend a few days with Dr. E. Flint of the 
class of '87. 

'94. — R. E. Smith has written a bulletin recently 
on •' Pear Blight " at the University of California. 

'97. — The engagement of MissM. D. Kittredge of 
Berkely, Cal. to Dr. C. A. Peters, professor of chem- 
istry at the University of Idaho, was recently 
announced. 

Ex-'98.— H. I. Wolcott Is located with the Hitch- 
cock Plumbers Supply Co., Dwight St.. Springfield. 

'99. — Dr. W. E. Hinds will remain in Washington, 
D. C. until after the Inauguration ceremonies and 
will then go to Dallas, Tex. 

'99. — We are glad to learn of the success of Ber- 
nard H. Smith, in his election as president of the 
Senior Law class of the National university — it being 
the largest class in the university history and number- 
ing nearly a hundred men. Mr. Smith Is an assistant 
chemist in the bureau of Chemistry of the United 



Regals in Quarter Sizes 

Fit any foot. 

J. J. GARDNER, Agent, 

12 South College. 



IT F»-T O'OATB 



Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 



Amherst, Mass. 



W. M. 8BAKS, '06. 



F. E. Shaw, '07. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 



ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 



I 




96 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



States Deparment of Agriculture and has taken advan- 
tage of the evening course in law. Again we see the 
result of a " strenuous life." He will continue in 
Chemistry, making a practical application of Law to 
Chemistry. 

'00.— A son, Ellis Freeman Parmenter, was bom to 
George Parmenter on Jan. 6. 

'00.— News comes to us of the recent marriage of 
A. M. West, who is an assistant in the Biochemic 
Division of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

'00.— Dr. A. W. Morrill leaves for Texas this week. 
His headquarters are at Dallas. 

•01.— R. I. Smith has been appointed State Ento- 
mologist of Georgia. 

•03. Paul N. Nersessian leaves Boston this week 

for Liverpool, thence to his home in Turkey. Address 
Care of Dr. K. Najarian. Marash. Turkey. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, it has pleased the Heavenly Father to take unto 
Himself the father of our beloved friend and classmate. 
Clinton King, be it 

Resolved. That we the class of 1907 of ^e M A C_do 
hereby extend our heartfelt sympathy to him and his family 
In their bereavement and further be it 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to him 
and his family and that a copy of the same be published in 

the College Signal. 

M. W. Clark. Jr.. ) 

V. T. Carruthers. > For the Class. 

A. J. Larned. j 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 

The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Guyer Hats and A. B. Ktrsch- 

baum & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN and H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON A THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Lehigh university has been added to the list which 
has adopted the honor system. 



Embetst Ifoouse. 



bTRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



O. H. KENDRICK. PMMlirOd. 




WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 8, 1905 



NO. 9 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Amherst. Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until Its discontinuance Is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BCASD OF EDITORS. 

JOHN FRANKLIN LYMAN. 1905. Editor-in Chief. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. Business Manager. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES. 1906. Assistant Business Manager. 
ALLEN NEWMAN SWAIN. 1905. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT. 1906. Intercollegiate. 

PERCY FREDERIC WILLIAMS. 1905, Department Notes. GEORGE HENRY CHAPMAN, 1906, Alumni Notes. 

ALBERT DAVIS TAYLOR, 1905, College Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS, 1907. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS, JR.. 1906. EDWIN DANIELS PHILBRICK. 1907. Athletics. 



Terms i fl.OO per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 26c. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association, 



L. S. Walker, Pres. 

E. W. Newhali. Jr., Manager. 

W. A. Munson. Pres. 

H. F. Thompson, Sec. 



Athletic Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 
Nineteen Hundred and Six Index. 
Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 

B. Tupper, Manager. 

F. H. Kennedy, Manager. 

G. W. Patch. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Ed i-to rials. 



The baseball situation looks brighter this year than 
for several years. The pitching department is proba- 
bly the strongest that Massachusetts has had for 
several years, and if a good catcher can be developed 
the battery is sure to give a good account of itself. 
About twenty men reported to Capt. Hunt at the first 
practice Feb 28. Owing to the crisis in the senior class 
situation a new election of captain took place Saturday 
when F. H. Kennedy was elected to lead the team 
this season. W. O. Taft was elected manager and 
J. G. Curtis assistant manager. Whether the Seniors 
leave or not it is the duty of every undergraduate to 
do all In his power to bring out the strongest team 
possible at M. A. C. The following are candidates for 
positions on the team : 1906, Kennedy, Martin, Pray 
and Tirrell; 1907. Clark, Shaw; 1908, Bartlett. 
Bates, Chase, Draper, Grady, Johnson, Pagllery, 
Parker, Shattuck. Warner and Whitmarsh. 



Conditions at the college are, at present, very 
peculiar and furthermore very unfortunate as there is 
now no senior class on its rolls, no seniors in its class- 
rooms, and no seniors in Its college life. We could 
not. should we attempt it. give a discussion of the 
matter in a fair manner, so we will simply set forth 
the facts as we see them. About three weeks ago a 
general outbreak occurred in the senior class In 
Political Science. No particular men were marked 
out as leaders by the professor in charge ; but the 
matter went up before the faculty as a general class 
affair. The punishment placed on the class was 
the suspension of three members for the period 
of one year, and the entire class was to make a public 
apology to the professor in whose class room the dis- 
turbance arose. The three men selected for suspen- 
sion were, as far as could be learned, picked not 
because of any special part that they had taken in the 
affair. The class asked for a hearing before the 
faculty, which was granted, but the faculty stood firm 
in sustaining their previous action. The Seniors felt 
that a great injustice had been done them, since every 












THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 




member of the class openly acknowledged that he was 
as guilty as the men who were suspended ; and under 
these circumstances It was thought that some equita- 
ble mode of punishment should be followed. It was 
decided by the class to withdraw from college in a 
body. Here the local alumni took up the case. 
They prevailed on the Seniors to make the required 
amends, and to return to their work while they 
mediated between the class and the faculty for a recon- 
ciliation. The alumni were unable to accomplish 
their desired purpose and the Seniors have now all 
gone out. not as a class this time, but simply as 
Individuals. These are the principal facts of the case 
and beyond this we will not go into the matter at this 
time. 



REUNION OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRI- 
CULTURAL COLLEGE CLUB OF 
WASHINGTON. 

The second annual reunion and banquet of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College Club of Washington 
was held on the evening of Jan. 3oth, at the Shoreham 
Hotel. Fourteen alumni and former students were 
present and the manifestations of good will that pre- 
vailed made it a reunion In every sense of the word. 
The Club started in last year with a membership of 
eleven, which number has now been increased to 
eighteen. We had with us this year eight who were 
unable to be with us on the previous occasion, of whom 
seven were new members. This large Increase is 
exceedingly gratifying and as there are other alumni 
in the vicinity who have not yet joined, we hope by 
next year to have made our number still larger. 

Dr. E. W. Allen, our President, was Toastmaster 
and In a very pleasing way spoke on the life and influ- 
ence of one of those who had been with us on the first 
occasion, Major H. E. Alvord. 

The work of Levi Stockbridge was also mentioned. 
Dr. Allen showed that we are getting in our enter- 
ing classes a much higher standard of scholarship, the 
members of which would be able to enter the leading 
colleges of the country. He emphasized the fact that 
we are the only exclusively agricultural college In the 
country and gave statistics which showed that we are 
surpassed only by Illinois and Iowa In point of mem- 
bers, it was suggested that the demand for trained 
agriculturists Is increasing, and that in agriculture 



proper no longer Is one man able to meet the demands 
for Instruction, but that the subject should be divided 
into a half a dozen different divisions. 

As the first speaker of the evening It was the plea- 
sure of the Toastmaster to Introduce to us. Mr. 
Simpson of the class of 71, who was one of that 
notable crew that won the boat race on the Connecti- 
cut river at Ingleslde. Mr. Simpson told of the trou- 
bles in securing funds to carry on the sport which was 
later dropped for this reason. Their first shell was an 
old second-hand affair, three and one half feet wide, 
little resembling those in use today. 

Mr. R. B. Moore of the class of *88 now superinten- 
dent of the Philadelphia works of the American 
Chemical Co.. was the next speaker Jhis reminiscences 
of college days were very interesting. Being of the 
class of 1888. he suggested that he was a "half-way" 

man. 

Mr. C. B. Lane '95. who Is Assistant Chief of the 
Dairy Dlv. of the U. S. Dept. Agriculture, spoke of 
the life and work of Major Alvord speaking at length 
of the unselfish nature of the man. and suggesting 
that he was not thoroughly understood by the people 
he sometimes had to deal with. It was suggested 
that Major Alvord was really the pioneer in the mat- 
ter of teaching agriculture by correspondence, having 
twenty years ago advocated this method. 

Mr. H. S. Fairbanks. '95. of Philadelphia Pa., 
spoke of a recent visit to the college and commended 
the unity of spirit which appeared to now prevail 
compared to the seeming lack of college spirit preva- 
lent nine years ago. 

Dr. W. E. Hinds. '99. of the U. S. Dept.of Agricul- 
ture. Bureau of Entomology, who is In charge of the 
laboratory for investigations in regard to the cotton 
boll weevil, at Dallas, Texs. was called upon to tell of 
the work which Dr. C. H. Fernald Is doing for the 
college and Its graduates In the line of entomology. 
It was stated that the laboratories at the present time 
are filled to overflowing with students and that more 
room Is needed to keep up with the demand for 
trained entomologists. 

Dr. A. A. Harmon, '00. of the Bureau of Animal 
Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, spoke concerning 
our Veterinary Dept. 

Mr. F. D. Couden, '04, of the U. S. Bureau of 
Entomology as a recent member of the editorial staff 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



99 



of the College Sicnal and Index told of some of the 
difficulties in securing matter for the paper and also 
addresses of the alumni for the Index. He suggested 
that the College Sicnal should be more of a college 
newspaper than a literary periodical filled with short 
stories, but blamed the latter condition upon the diffi- 
culties in getting the alumni and students to contribute 
articles of interest to the readers of the Signal. 

The club voted that a letter of sympathy be sent to 
President H. H. Goodell, wishing him a speedy return 
to health. 

The meeting was enlivened with stories of old col- 
lege days and songs of " Way down on the Aggie 
Farm," •• Solomon Levi," etc. 

The following were admitted to active membership: 
R. B. Moore, *85, of Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. S. Fairbanks, '95, Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. B. Simpson. 73, Washington, D. C. 
Dr. Thomas H. Charmsbury, ez-'97, Baltimore, Md. 
Mr. W. A. Hooker, '99, Amherst, Mass. 
Mr. F. D. Couden, '04, Washington, D. C. 
Dr. A. A. Harmon, '00, Washington, D. C. 

The suggestion was made that an effort be made to 
have the banquet next year on a night following that 
of the New York club in order that we may be able to 
have with us some of the faculty who come on to the 
New York meeting, perhaps when they would be 
unable to take the time to come from Amherst for the 
Washington reunion alone. 

The writer wishes to thank the past Secretary Mr. 
S. W. Wiley for the notes of the reunion. 

Bernand H. Smith, '99, Secretary. 



THE FRESHMAN BANQUET. 

The freshmen, after strenuous efforts to evade the 
vigilance of the sophomores, escaped without their 
departure being suspected and held the annual ban- 
quet, uninterrupted, at the Wilson Hotel, North 
Adams, Mass., on the night of the 25th. Elaborate 
precautions were taken by the freshmen to keep the 
upper classmen Ignorant of their destination. Forty- 
one members of the class left Amherst at 5 o'clock 
in the morning and went to Northampton by a special 
trolley car and then by train to Springfield. There 
they engaged a special car in a northbound train over 
the Connecticut river road and doubling on their 
tracks went through to Greenfield. They procured 



another special car out of Greenfield for North Adams. 
The secret had been so well kept by the committee 
of three, appointed for arrangements, that the name of 
the town in which the banquet was to be held, was 
kept a secret from the other members of the class 
until Greenfield had been passed. The time between 
their arrival and the hour for the banquet was spent 
in bowling alleys and an excursion to Williams College. 
In the evening ail went to the Richmond Theatre and 
frequently cheered the performance much to the 
delight of the audience. Trouble from Amherst was 
anticipated by the majority, with feeling akin to joy. 
The chairman of the committee received a telegram 
from a class-mate In Amherst stating that the sopho- 
mores were endeavoring to detect some clue of their 
head-quarters, but up to 4 o'clock nothing dangerous 
had been discovered. 

At 1 1 o'clock, when even the most timorous had 
ceased to anticipate interruption, the students with- 
drew to the dining-room and the enjoyment of the day 
began. The menu was choice and complete, and 
without the slightest disturbance to mar the pleasure, 
they progressed. Toasts then followed. The presi- 
dent of the class, T. A. Barry, was toastmaster and 
those who responded were: J. R. Parker, 'Massa- 
chusetts" ; H, C. Chase. "The Hash- House" ; A. J. 
Farley. "Our class. 1908"; R. H. Verbeck, "Ach 
Louis"; P. H. Eastman. "Co eds" ; C. C. Gowdey. 
"The class of 1907." Class elections of the meanest 
man. the easiest man, the homeliest man. the class 
plug, the best fusser then followed and contributed 
considerably to the hilarity of the evening. Sleep 
was entirely dispensed with on this occasion, as the 
party was at the station awaiting the arrival of their 
train at 5 o'clock. 

The committee consisted of M. M. Browne, chair- 
man, K. E. Gillet and H. M. Jennison. to whom the 
class Is greatly indebted for the consideration and 
foresight with which the arrangements were made. 

^ 

Pennsylvania has a novel scheme in use In her 
new gymnasium. It is so arranged that two nets, 
suspended from the ceiling, will divide the room into 
three equal parts. With these nets lowered it Is pos- 
sible for a basketball game, baseball practice and gym- 
nasium work to go on without interfering with each 
other. 




too 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






THE JUNIOR PROM. 

The junior class held its annual promenade in the 
Drill hall, Friday evening, Feb. 17. The hall was 
beautifully decorated with potted plants, evergreens, 
bunting and electric lights. In the center of the hall 
was a large maroon and white rosette from which 
streamers of maroon and white bunting radiated to 
the side walls and ends of the hall. The walls were 
banked with hemlock boughs, through which incandes- 
cent electric lights could be sesn at regular intervals, 
and to add to the beauty of the side walls, they were 
divided off into panels by strips of white. The Phil- 
harmonic orchestra of Springfield was situated under 
the center of the balcony, with booths on each side. 
Booths were also installed on the east side of the hall, 
under the balcony. Along the railing of the balcony 
at the south end of the hall was arranged a large and 
beautiful Massachusetts banner in maroon, with white 
letters. Near the north end of the hall was draped 
the large baseball net. completely banked In green. 
The center of the net was draped up. forming an 
archway over which was arranged in large white 
figures 1906. The archway, which was guarded by 
the two field rifles, led into a sort of a conservatory 
where there were easy chairs and corner seats 
covered wito college pillows. The patronesses 
received at the northwest corner of the hall In a large 
and beautifully arranged booth. They were Mrs. H. 
H. Goodell, Mrs. J. E. Ostrander. Mrs. F. S. Cooley. 
-% R. S. Lull, Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck, Mrs. Her- 
man Babson. A large number of potted plants were 
scattered along the sides of the hall which added 
greatly to Its beauty. 

" The program was small and very neat In design. 
It was covered with brown leather with " M. A. C. 
1906 " In burnt work on the outside. There were 24 
dances, with an hour's Intermission, during which 
Brown of Amherst served refreshments. 

The affair was a great success and much credit is 
due to the junior committee who had charge of the 
arrangements. The members of the committee 
were H. M. Russell of Bridgeport, Conn, (chairman), 
W C. Tannett of Boston. G. W. Sleeper of Swamp- 
scott, H. A. Suhlke of Leominster, Richard Welling- 
ton of Waltham, R. W. Peaks of Newtonville. S. S. 
Rogers of Boston, W. O. Taft of East Pepperell, G. 
T French of Tewksbury, Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck, Dr. 



R S Lull, and Professor Waugh. 

Among those present were the following couples: 
Professor and Mrs. Ostrander. Dr. and Mrs. Lull, 
Professor and Mrs. Babson, Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck 
Mrs F S Cooley. Dr. Collins of Northampton and 
Miss Harrington of Smith college, Henri Hasklns 
and Mrs. Hasklns of Amherst. George A. Drew of 
Greenwich, Conn, and Miss Brooks of Wellesley col- 
lege, N. F. Monahan of Amherst and Miss Hunt of 
Newton E. G. Proulx of Amherst and Miss Lee of 
Mount Holyoke, G. D. Jones of North Amherst and 
Miss Cowles of Burnham. E. S. Fulton of Amherst 
and Miss Monahan of South Framingham, E. K. 
Atkins and Mrs. Atkins of Northampton and Mr. 
Kibby and Miss Carney of Mount Holyoke. 

1905. 
H. D. Crosby and Miss Ephlin of Leominster. A. 
D Taylor and Miss Ferguson of Vassar. A. N. Swain 
and Miss Moody of Wellesley, W. A. Munson and 
Miss Livers of Radcliffe. C. L. Whitaker and Miss 
Dodge of Smith, G. W. Patch and Miss Cathcart of 
Waltham. G. N. Willis and Miss Alice Cathcart of 
Waltham. G. H. Allen and Miss Barker of Smith, E. 
W Newhalll, Jr. and Miss Peers of Smith, C. S. 
Holcomb and Miss Woodworth of Mount Holyoke. 

1906. 
A H. M. Wood and Miss Crockett of Stoughton. 
S S Rogers and Miss Peakes of Newtonville. R. W. 
Peakes and Miss Rogers of Simmons college. Rich- 
ard Wellington and Miss Wellington of Waltham. E. 
F Gaskill and Miss Jones of New Canaan, Conn., L. 
H. Mosley and Miss Rockwell of Wellesley, E. P. 
Mudge and Miss Mudge of Swampscott, E. H. Scott 
and Miss Coggeshall of Ossining. N. Y.. H. M. Rus- 
sell and Miss Farnsworth of Mount Holyoke. C. E. 
Hood and Miss Mittelback of Dedham. G. W. Sleeper 
and Miss Sleeper of Swampscott. H. A. Suhlke and 
Miss Drake of New Hartford. Conn.. G. T. French 
and Miss Bickford of Melrose. W. O. Taft and Miss 
Reynolds of Smith. W. W. Colton and Miss Pray of 
Natick, F. H. Kennedy and Mrs. Myrick of Boston. 

1907. 
C. H. Chadwick and Miss Livers of Boston. 

1908. 
A D Farrar and Miss Cobb of Amherst. L. W. 
Chapman and Miss Jones of South Framingham. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



101 



BASKETBALL. 

1908. 9; 1907. 8. 

The annual class game between the two lower 
classes took place Friday night. The freshmen were 
picked to win the contest as three of the college team 
are in that class. This they did but the closeness of 
the score speaks volumes for the playing of the sopho- 
mores. Both teams played fast basketball covering 
closely at all times. For this reason the ball was on 
the floor a good portion of the time. The passing of 
the sophomore team was far superior to that of the 
freshman five, but they lacked the accuracy of the 
lower class In shooting for baskets. 

The game started with a rush and Regan soon 
caged a goal for '08. Gillett followed his example 
and then came a long pause in the scoring in which 
some of the finest passing and blocking seen in the 
Drill hall this season took place. Pierce caged one 
for '07 and Whitmarsh scored for '08. Bates shot a 
clean one and Peters carromed a pretty goal from a 
difficult angle. Later Peters scored again, this end- 
ing the scoring in tne first period. Score, '08. 8 ; 
'07. 6. 

The second period opened with plenty of enthusi- 
asm and Pierce caged another basket for the sopho- 
mores. Whitmarsh added one point for '08 by scor- 
ing from foul. This ended the scoring of the game. 

For '08 Regan, Gillett. and Whitmarsh excelled 
while Cutter, Wood and Green played hard for the 
sophomores. The line-up: 

1908. 1907. 

Cobb, 1. f. r. b.. Green, Chapman 

Whitmarsh, r. f. 1. b.. Pelers 

Gillett. c. c. Wood 

Regan, I. b, r. f.. Cutter 

Bates. Farrar, r. b. I. f., Pierce 

Goals from floor— Pierce 2, Peters 2. Gillett, Whitmarsh, 
Regan. Bates. Goals from foul — Whitmarsh. Referee — 
Fulton '04. Timers— Clark "07. Chase '08. Time— 20 and 
15 minute periods. 



PHI KAPPA PHI. 

The last number of College and Alumni News, 
published by the Alumni, contained a short article on 
Phi Kappa Phi discussing its relations to the alumni 
especially and outlining briefly the objects of the 
fraternity. It Is undoubtedly known to all that this is 



an honorary fraternity and that membership is based 
upon scholarship. To indicate the requirements for 
admission and the significance of the various elections 
is the main object of this article. 

The constitution of the fraternity restricts the 
membership from one class to one-third of its mem- 
bers and all these must have reached a certain rank 
determined by the chapter. At the end of the 
Junior year not more than three from the class may 
be elected to membership whose standing according 
to the registrar's books for their three years is above 
85%. 

At a meeting in February three more from the 
class (now the senior class) may be admitted who 
must also have reached the 85% mark in scholar- 
ship for the seven semesters according to the regis- 
trar's books. 

In June such members of the class may be elected 
to membership as have reached the 80% mark in 
their college course but only such a number can be 
chosen as will not exceed a total of one third of the 
members of the class. The above statement will 
show clearly that the fraternity stands for a higher 
grade of scholarship, and membership In It means 
faithful and honest work on the part of the under- 
graduate. 

It ought to be stated that the fraternity Is represen- 
ted by a chapter in our college through the efforts of 
seven members (the charter members of the chapter) 
of the class of 1904 who, with Dr. H. T. Fernald of 
the University of Maine chapter were instrumental In 
establishing the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
chapter. 

From each class that has been graduated there 
may be chosen three who would have been eligible at 
the time of their graduation and have made an 
honorable record after graduation, 

With Invited faculty members, graduate members, 
charter members, and undergraduate members there 
are now about seventy who have completed member- 
ship in the M. A. C. chapter. 

A small fee at the time of election covers the 
general expenses of the chapter and the cost of an 
attractive diploma to which each member Is entitled. 

The officers of the chapter are as follows: Presi- 
dent, Prof. C. H. Fernald; treasurer, E. B. Holland ; 
secretary. S. F. Howard, 



« 




102 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



103 










College N°**S- 



—Prof. G. 0. Greene and wife have moved into 
their new home on Phillips street. 

—A. F. Hamburger, "08 ; Hayward, '08 ; and G. 
H. Chapman, '06. have left college. 

—Captain Hunt has commenced baseball practice 
in the drill hall with a large squad of men. 

—Candidates for election to the board should 
have all their material in before the next issue. 

—The next issue of the Signal will be the last 
one under the supervision of the present board of 
editors. 

The members of the short course visited Mt. 

Hermon on Feb. 22 to score the herd kept at the 
school barns. 

j, p. Lyman, 05, has been at Rutland, Mass. 

for a week conducting the milk test on a herd of 
registered cattle. 

p ro f. F. C. Canning has been instructing the 

division in horticulture from the senior class during 
Prof. Waugh's absence. 

— Whltaker, '05, Allen, "05, Curtis, '07, and 
Anderson, '08, attended the annual Junior Promenade 
at Mt. Holyoke on Feb. 22. 

—Prof. C. S. Walker and wife gave an informal 
reception on Saturday afternoon Feb. 18 at their 
ne* tome on Lincoln avenue. 

p p. Williams. '05, attended the annual banquet 

of the Boston alumni chapter of Kappa Sigma at the 
Hotel Essex, Boston, Feb. 21. 

F. F. Henshaw, '04. passed a few days at college 

recently ; he is preparing to take the civil service 
examination for aid In the geodetic survey. 

p ro f, f. A. Waugh who has recently been 

confined to the house with an attack of the grip Is 
now away from college for a vacation of a week. 

—At the second drawing of Phi Kappa Phi frater- 
nity the three following persons were elected from the 
senior class to membership : R. L. Adams. Miss S. 
E. Cushman, and H. F. Tompson. These students 
must have attained an average In scholarship of 85% 
or more for the course of three and one half years. 



Austin. '08. had an article on the dairy school In 
the New York Tribune Farmer for Feb. 9. The article 
was well Illustrated wl;h views of the buildings and 
apparatus. 

—P. H. Smith addressed the farmer's institute at 
Buckland last Thursday under the auspices of the 
Buckland Farmer's club. He discussed the question 
of how the farmers could grow their own protein 

—The committee on Agriculture from the legisla- 
ture gave a hearing to the complainants at the 
Amherst court room on Friday, Feb. 24. The pro- 
posed amendment was withdrawn and the original 
bill for the appropriation left intact. 

— The junior class at a recent meeting elected the 
following officers : F. H. Kennedy, president ; L. H. 
Moseley, vice-president; R. Wellington, secretary and 
treasurer; M. F. Wholley, historian; J. E. Martin, 
class captain ; W. O. Taft. sergeant-at-arms. 

Professor Brooks has recently received word from 

the Western Alumni Association who propose to offer 
a prize to the student who has made the greatest 
Improvement during his first two years at college. 
The men are to be recommended by the College 
Senate with the approval of the sophomore instructors. 



YOUNG MEN AND PRETTINESS 

The editor of Association Men, the monthly maga- 
zine of the International Y. M. C. A., says: "A 
glance Into not a few young men's rooms has startled 
us. The rooms were spangled and stuffed with taw- 
dry and trlval prettlness, the tinsel and bizarre of 
•Turkish corners.' The walls were decorated with 
pictures of stage beauties, women fencers and cheap 
Sunday supplement chromos. There were 'cosey cor- 
ners' and gay-colored cushions galore, and some 
reeked with perfume. We looked for masculine 
strength, a suggestion of robust vigor, but the nearest 
to It was the prize fighter picture, or the football field 
in which the swagger crowd effaced the sense of 
athleticism. There were fencing foils, but these 
were unnlcked and clean. Everything suggested 
luxuriousness, fickleness and effeminacy. We would 
prefer to see the stern, bare walls of the ascetic's cell 
to such truck. These things are not masculine. 
They suggest the disgusting, rotten Turk. There is a 
place for the trophies of the hunt or the contest, a 



place for books and noble pictures and strong furniture, 
but things that are 'just pretty' or suggest sensuous 
riot and soft indulgence ought to be despised and dis- 
carded by men. Virility and virtue, clean minds and 
hardened bodies are not bred in such swan's down. 
The 'Simple Life' advocated by Charles Wagner and 
'The Stenuous Life' by his friend, and The Saintly 
Life" by our Lord are not coming from such cradles." 



^ 

FOOTBALL REPORT. 




RECEIPTS. 




Subscriptions : 








Students, 






$324 50 


Faculty, 






88 50 


Alumni, 






265 00 


Gate Receipts : 








W. P. I. 






13 00 


Guarantees : 








Holy Cross, 






65 00 


Darmouth. 






165 00 


Williams, 






75 00 


Brown, 






175 00 


Wesley an, 






75 00 


Springfield Trainir 


g School. 




112 72 


Pittsfield. 






125 00 


Tufts, 






110 00 




EXPENSES. 




Coaching, 






$33£ 80 


Printing, Stamps, 






16 70 


Outfitting, 






307 57 


Express, carfare, telegrams, 




12 04 


Repairing, 






5 70 


Drugs, 






4 45 


Back bills, 






77 53 


Games : 








Holy Cross, 






72 30 


Dartmouth, 






148 07 


Williams. 






73 67 


Brown, 






145 98 


Wesleyan. 






76 41 


Springfield Training School, 




43 65 


W.P. 1., 






73 25 


Pittsfield, 






73 32 


Tufts. 






110 10 


Cash on hand, 






18 18 

«i cm •>-> 




Respectfully submitted. 




E. 


W. 


Newhall. Manager. 


(Signed) H. J. Franklin. Auditor. 


M. 


A. C. A. B. 



A college bookstore controlled entirely by a cooper- 
ative association among the students has been started 
at the Uunlversity of Illinois. 



ABANDONED FARMS. 

During the past year or two the press and the people 
of this country have had much to say concerning 
abandoned farms and their utilization both for pleasure 
and profit. This controversy has arisen from several 
causes, chief among them being the existing tendency 
to get back to nature, the opening of the country dis- 
tricts by the trolley line, the Increased cost of living 
and a desire for a healthy, economical place to spend 
one's summer. This controversy, even If It had not 
amounted to more than such, could not but have had 
an Influence for the better on all concerned. The 
questions and Inquiry showed to the city, very vividly, 
both the needs and the advantage of the country, the 
possibilities of Its greater development and tended to 
bring city and country into closer relations with one 
another, a much desired end. 

Before going farther let us consider what the term 
"abandoned farm" means. In its general acceptance it 
refers to the erstwhile prosperous farms of our New 
England hill districts, farms that are now grown up to 
weeds and brush. They are painful reminders of the 
effect of the western homestead lands on our districts, 
and of the rush to the cities by the young people of 
the country. Under the effects of these hindrances 
the old folks were not able to carry on the farm, and 
operations were curtailed and finally abandoned. On 
the death of the owners such farms were usually held 
for back taxes. 

Although the word abandoned implies uselessness, It 
cannot be so taken In this case ; for, on the contrary, 
when correctly handled an abandoned farm is a very 
useful and profitable piece of property. There are 
many striking Instances of this In our own state. 
In developing the possibilities of such a farm the first 
thing essential is knowledge ; second, capital ; and 
third, persistency and fixedness of purpose. An aban- 
doned farm is an ideal place for the Intelligent and 
profitable application of the principles of agriculture as 
taught in our agricultural colleges today. 

Most of these farms have passed Into the hands of 
the several state governments and are on sale through 
their boards of agriculture. New Hampshire in 
partictular made a decided effort In this line. They 
issued a catalogue of the abandoned farms of the state 
giving a brief description and price of each. This 






104 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*°5 



catalogue was in great demand and several editions 
were distributed. As a result very many of the 
abandoned farms of that state have been reclaimed, 
so to speak, and the revenues of the state have been 
Increased in proportion. Another result has been the 
reawakening in the sons and the daughters of New 
Hampshire of their old interest in their native state. 
This is one example of what can be done in this 

line. 

Many of these farms are situated in close proxim- 
ity to good markets ; and It is to such that the stu- 
dents of the agricultural colleges had best give their 
attention. Poultry, fruit, milk, cream, and vegetables 
are among the possibilities, not to mention pork and 
wool. These farms can be bought cheaply and by 
the Intelligent application of the lessons learned along 
the lines of soil renovation and intensive cropping 
students can arrive at a stage of Independent owner- 
ship much sooner than in other ways. There need be 
no fear of overproduction; but one-seventh of the 
inhabitants of our state are farmers and the other 
six-sevenths are dependant upon them for food. 

These farms, are attracting the attention not only of 
people with limited means but of those with capital as 
well. I give one instance of this in our own state. 
A certain business man has bought a whole township 
with the village that had been abandoned and is car- 
rying on extensive agricultural operations under scien- 
tific principles. So far his venture has been a marked 
st : -.ies, and there is no reason why it should not con- 
tinue to be so. This is only one example, but several 
cases are known where, by the generous application of 
fertilizers, enough was derived from the first year's 
crops to pay for the farm. 

There can be but one result of such ventures as 
this : the upbuilding and the repopulatlng of our coun- 
try districts. Take the instance already mentioned ; 
there was a whole township deserted, existing but in 
name when capital and modern agricultural science 
stepped in. and behold the village awoke, signs of 
life and action appeared, the hills once more echoed 
with the hearty voice of the husbandman and all was 
bright and prosperous. Such is the result of utilizing 
our abandoned farms and charging anew that fountain 
of manhood from whence has come the rugged 
strength to build our cities and nation. 

B. ( '08. 



PUBLISHING A NEWSPAPER. 

" It looks so cheap, and — when one has gleaned the 
news from it— so worthless, certainly the making of it 
does not seem to have cost much in time, labor, 
brains, or money. Doubtless the average reader of a 
daily paper of the first class has no conception of the 
cost or the method of its making; he is not likely to 
regard the process as complex, and though he sees and 
admits " the power of the press," he would be probably 
surprised to learn that Its annual product In America 
alone amounts to one hundred million dollars; that the 
aggregate annual circulation of the 20.000 periodical 
publications printed in the United States and Canada 
is more than four billions— a stupendous figure which 
implies or allows the yearly purchase of 300 copies of 
some periodical by each family of five persons in the 
land. That, in a word, is to say, the influence of 
American journalism reaches to every American 

home." 

The above quotation from Melville Philips very 
appropriately fits in here and seems the clearest way 
of starting an article of this character. The news- 
paper does seem to be about the cheapest and most 
worthless affair that ever graced an American home. 
As a certain fictitious character has been recorded to 
have said : " The newspapers ? Sir, they are the 
most villainous, licentious, abominable, Infernal — Not 
that I ever read them ! " But it is not the purpose of 
this article to criticize, but rather to explain In as con- 
cise a manner as possible the stupendous amount of 
work and enterprise required to publish or " get out " 
an ordinary issue of a metropolitan dally. 

A newspaper of the first class is the product of an 
army of skilled workmen. Of prime importance is the 
news which Its local reporters, those in different parts 
of the country, and those In foreign lands, gathers for 
it. In every part of the world It is represented and it 
may have as many as a thousand local reporters con- 
tributing their mite towards rounding out the record of 
a day's news. 

Before four in the afternoon there is comparatively 
little doing in a newspaper office. The editor-in-chief 
of course has already begun to mould public opinion 
and doubtless several of the editorial writers may be 
at work on certain articles suggested or endorsed by 
the editor. As the day wears on however the bustle 
of the office Increases and by four the whole place Is 



fully astir. The reporters come and go ; the telepraph 
boys toll up and clatter down the stairs ; the news 
editor is clearing the field for action and one or two of 
his assistants, the telegraph editors, are at their desks 
"handling early copy" — that is looking over the 
" manifolded " despatches on thin, oily paper known 
as "flimsy," which come in yellow envelopes from the 
press associations, and have for the most part been 
printed in the afternoon papers. And so the work 
goes on and when the managing editor returns from 
dinner at eight o'clock or thereabouts he finds every- 
thing running smoothly if not at full speed. The man- 
aging editor is the chief person there. He " makes 
up" the paper, determins its size, allots to each depart- 
ment its proper place and furthermore Is responsible 
for what goes in or stays out of the paper. The night 
editor is probably the most energetic person In the 
office. He could very readily be called " one of the 
foremost exponents of the strenuous life." First he is 
in the composing room, then bending over the" stones ;" 
now he comes rushing back, his bundle of proofs 
streaming in the air, to alter a schedule, stop a stupid 
despatch, point out an error to a telegraph editor, or 
light his pipe. 

Meanwhile amid the rattling click -of telegraph 
instruments, pale-faced editors under a row of electric 
lights are patiently blue-penciling new despatches as 
they read them. There may be more than 50.000 
words received from press associations which have to 
be edited carefully, read intelligently and closely, 
" boiled down." and heads put on it of just so many 
letters to a line ; this amid the shouts of the night 
editor, the antics of the office boy, the queries of proof 
readers and bitter reminders from the copy cutter. 
This department Is one of the best places in the world 
to observe the truth of the adage : — " Concentration 
Is the secret of thought." 

The same confusion is manifestly obvious in the 
composing room. Compositors pile up galley upon 
galley of type until the hour arrives for the first of the 
pages to "go down." The galleys are then dumped 
upon the stones and the type arranged ready for use. 
Each form represents a page and is mounted upon a 
moving table. After much assiduous labor the first 
of the pages Is ready for the electrotypers and the 
others follow at regular intervals. The most critical 
moment In the whole stage of the paper's preparation 



is during the work on the last page, and then it is well 
to be careful of what you say to the night editor, for at 
this time he is anything but an agreeable man to talk 
to. He is trying to get twenty columns of news 
marked " must " into a page of eight columns and get 
it there in five minutes. The marvel Is. that. In some 
inexplicable way. by a method known only to the choice 
of the craft, he succeeds. To fail on account of time 
is to miss the mails and to miss the mails is to cause 
to rise the righteous wrath of the constant reader. 

When at last the night editor returns to his den 
dripping with perspiration, the page has already been 
electrotyped, the plates carried to the press room, and 
then with a mighty throb and clank the presses begin 
their work. In an hour's time over fifty miles of white 
paper have been run through the machines, cutting, 
pasting, folding and delivering twenty-five complete 
copies a second. One of these, the night editor soon 
holds in his hand and scans Its damp pages for flaws. 

Perhaps an hour or two may elapse before the last 
" lift " of the form for corrections or additions is made. 
Over the wires at the end of the last sheet of flimsy 
comes the welcome message, " Good night." The 
reporters have long left the office, the compositors are 
leaving, and soon the editors themselves fare forth to 
their omelettes or oysters. 



Alu 



mm. 



The annual banqujt of the Connecticut Valley 
alumni Association of M. A. C. was held at 
the Hotel Worthy. Springfield. Feb. 17, 1905. As 
the Junior Prom came the same evening there was 
but a small delegation from the college present and 
although the attendance was not as large as expected 
it was a very enjoyable gathering. One thing which 
seriously affected the rejoicing was the absence of 
President Goodell. Resolutions of regret and sym- 
pathy were drawn up and forwarded to the president. 

On a motion of Judge Lyman, 71, it was voted to 
extend a cordial invitation to the college to furnish 
music of some description by the undergraduates at 
the association's next annual dinner. 

Dr. James B. Paige of Amherst was the guest of 
the evening and spoke on the college and its president. 

The officers elected for the ensuing year were as 
follows: President, William P. Birnie. 71 ; vice- 







io6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




president, Charles Goodrich. '93 ; second vice-presi- 
dent. A. S. Kinney, "96; treasurer, J. B. Minor, 73 ; 
secretary, H. D. Hemenway, '95. 

The speakers were Mr. C E. Beach, '82. president 
of the association, Mr. E. B. Smead, 7 1. who wished 
to become better acquainted with the work done by 
the more recent classes ; Prof. S. F. Howard, '94. 
on athletics and Phi Kappa Phi ; Professor White, 
'95 of Storrs; Dr. C. S. Kinney, C. E. Lyman, 79. 
Charles Goodrich, '93, Robert W. Lyman, 71, Cyrus 
M. Hubbard, "92. John B. Minor, 72, P. F. Wil- 
liams, '05. 

The following were present: As guests, Dr. James 
B. Paige of Amherst; William P. Birnie. 71; 
George Leonard. 71; Robert W. Lyman, 71; 
Edwin B. Smead. 71 ; Daniel P. Cole, 72; Walter 
W. Swazey, 72 ; John B. Minor, 73 ; E. L. Barr. 
79; C. E. Lyman. 79; Charles E. Beach, '82; 
Morris Kingman, '82 ; Charles S. Phelps, '82 ; Mor- 
ris Kingman, '82 ; Charles S. Phelps, '85 ; Walter 
A. Brown. '91 ; Walter I. Boynton. '92; Cyrus M. 
Hubbard. '92 ; Richard P. Lyman. '92 ; Dr. Char- 



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ditional.) 

Prof. G. Bixler, 97 Odgen ave., Chicago, 111. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



107 



les Goodrich. '93 ; Dr. T. S. Bacon. '94 ; Charles 
L. Brown, '94 ; Prof. S. F. Howard, '94 ; H. D. 
Hemenway, '95; Fred C. Tobey, '95; Prof. E. A. 
White, '95 ; Prof. A. S. Kinney. '96 ; Myron H. 
West. '03 ; Percy F. Williams. '05. 

A paper was circulated by Professor Howard, chair- 
man of the athletic committee in the interests of 
athletics which was heartily subscribed to. The next 
annual dinner will be held Feb. 20, 1906. 

'75. — P. M. Harwood's work as agent at the Dairy 
Bureau of the Massachusetts State Board of Agricul- 
ture appears to have been successful and highly appre- 
ciated, as he has been recommended for an increase 
of salary. 

'89.— R. P. Sellew, 249 West Newton St.. Boston. 

'92.— P. P. Lyman In firm of Colton & Lyman, 
Surgeons. 1260 Main St., Hartford. Conn. 

Ex-'94. — E. W. Morse, Instructor in Natural His- 
tory. Bussey Institute. Jamaica Plain. Mass., suggests 
a plan for raising money among alumni and friends of 
the college for the erection of a building for the agri- 
cultural department as a memorial to Professor 
Stockbridge. 

'94. — C. P. Lounsbury has gone to South America 
from South Africa for six months, in the Interests of 
Entomology. 

'97. — The University of Wisconsin is soon to offer 
a course in Meteorology under the Instruction of M. 
L. Bartlett. 

'01.— Married Jan. 7. 1905 at Natick, Mass., 
James H. Chlckering and Miriam B. DeMerlt. 

Ex- '02. — H. C. James. 48 Boylston St.. Boston. 
Mass. % B. Y. M. C. W. 

'04.— A. W. Gilbert has been selected by the 
athletic association as official referee of the Cornell 
university basketball team. He refereed the recent 
game in the Intercollegiate championship series 
between Cornell and Princeton. 

04. — A. L. Peck Is in Amherst for a few days. 



Regals in Quarter Sizes 

Fit any foot. 

J. J. GARDNER, Agent, 

12 South College. 



UP^TO-DATE 

Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 
Amherst, Mam. 



W. M. Sbam, '06. 



r. E. 8HAW, '07. 



The board of student organizations at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago has adopted the rule that hereafter all 
surpluses over expenditures in the publication of stu- 
dent paper, from university dances, socials and enter- 
tainments and the Reynolds club, shall be turned into 
a general fund for the establishing of scholarships. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 






io8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



RESOLUTIONS 

Of the Q. T. V. fraternity on the death of George 
F. King, father of our brother, Clinton King. 

Whereas, Death has taken from this earthly life George F. 
King, father of our brother Clinton King, and 

Whereas, A great loss has befallen eur brother, be it 
Resolved. That -we, the Amherst chapter of the Q . T. V. 
fraternity, wish to express tc our brother our sincere and 
heartfelt sympathy And be it further 

Resolved. That these resolutions be published in the College 
Signal, and the Amherst Record, also that a copy be placed 
on file in the chapter rooms. 

C. W. Lewis, 
Richard Wellington 
Ralph W. Peakes. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 



'j 



The largest stock and the lowest prices In town. 

Agents for the celebrated Guyer Hats and A. B. Kirsch- 

baum & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN amd H. P. GLOVES. 



For the 

Fraternity 



Irvtcrcollfgi&'te. 



SANDERSON <& THOMPSON, 



Pittsburg is to be the seat of a new university simi- 
lar to the one at Chicago. 

The first college paper was started at Dartmouth 
and Daniel Webster was its first editor. 

There will probably be an increase in the tuition fee 
at Yale owing to her big deficit of last year, 

A friend of Oberlin College has made up the money 
lost by some of the students in the Student's Bank. 

A hall of natural history costing $200,000 is to be 
built at Syacuse. Work will begin as soon as possible. 

For the first time in thirty years, Syracuse Univer- 
sity is out of debt The reason for this is a recent 
bequest of $50,000. 

/-two students have been suspended from 
Leland Stanford on account of poor work and seventy- 
eight others have been warned that the quality of 
their work must be improved if they wish to sustain 
their relationship with the university. 



Hmbetst Ifoouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. M. KBNDRICK. Pmormimrom. 



AMHERST. 



Belie jgj Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 

The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., - 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS., MARCH 22. 1905. 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal, Amherst, Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS, JR.. 1906. Editor-in Chief. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES, 1906, Business Manager. 

EDWIN DANIELS PHILBRICK, 1907. Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES WALTER CARPENTER. 1906. Department Notes. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT. 1906, Intercollegiate. 

WILLIAM WALLACE COLTON. 1906, College Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HICGINS, 1907. Alumni Notes. 

EARLE COODMAN BARTLETT, 1907. Athletics. CLINTON KING, 1907. 

HERBERT LINWOOD WHITE. 1908. MARCUS METCALF BROWNE, 1908. 



Terms i $1.00 per gear in adcance. Single Copies, lOc. Postage outside of United States and Canada. 26c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 

College Senate, 

Reading- Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. H. Moseley, Pres. Athletic Association. 

R. W. Peakes. Manager. Base-Bail Association, 

W. A. Munson. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Seven Index. 

J. E. Martin, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 

Basket-ball Association, A. T. Hastings. Manager. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 

W. O. Taft, Manager. 

M. H.Clark. Manager. 

G. W. Patch. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tori&ls. 



We are glad to be able to state that conditions at 
college have assumed a far more pleasant aspect 
than for some weeks past. The gloom and discour- 
agement we were plunged in is fast disappearing — an 
agreement has been reached between the faculty and 
the seniors by which It is believed, the whole class 
will be allowed to pursue its work. The seniors are 
fast returning and those here are attending all their 
regular exercises. The other undergraduates have 
been In full sympathy with them during all the trouble 
and they now extend their congratulations. We all 
hope that the conciliation will soon become complete 
and so far as It Is possible the whole affair dropped 
and forgotten. 



reports, the faculty wish to decree. The student 
body is entirely opposed to such an action under the 
present conditions because we feel that our vacations 
are too short in the first place, and then we have our 
cuts allowed, and when and why we use them should 
remain with us. The usual vacations allowed at 
other colleges during Thanksgiving time or in the 
spring are from 10 to 14 days. We are given five. 
Many of the fellows live at such a distance that they 
feel so short a time as five days Is hardly worth the 
carfare home. And then to many others the days spent 
at home mean extra days of work and hence more of 
the wherewithal. It is for these reasons that we say 
lengthen the vacations, or let us use our cuts as we 
please. 



There has been much talk lately among the stu- 
dents about the double cut system during the days 
immediately before or after a scheduled vacation 
which, according to several more or less authentic 



Considering that this Signal is the first attempt of 
the new board a word or two concerning our plans 
and our desires is not out of place. That the Col- 
lege Signal should be a paper of interest both to the 
students and to the alumni is our one paramount 
desire. F. D. Couden. 1904, at the annual reunion 



nO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tit 






and banquet of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege Club of Washington held on the evening of Jan. 
30th., suggested that the College Signal should be 
more of a college newspaper than a literary periodical 
filled with short stories. If he had added an alumni 
newspaper as well as a college newspaper he would 
have expressed the key-note of our hopes. To keep 
the alumni in constant touch with the college and to 
keep the college Informed of the alumni is our aim. 
To do this we must have the hearty and willing co-op- 
eration of the alumni as well as of the student body; the 
board must work harmoniously together, each striving 
to make his work the best, and at the same time help- 
ing each other. As the work of the college is more 
devoted to science and to nature than to classical 
study, it seems best that the literary work of the Sig- 
nal should be more in this line than are short stories 
or any other such writings. We earnestly desire the 
students and alumni to send in contributions as often 
as they can. The success of the paper depends 
almost entirely upon this. Any criticisms or suggest- 
ions for the betterment of the paper will be most 
thankfully received by the board. With these words 
of greeting we will strive to make our paper one that 
will be a credit to our college. The members of the 
new board of editors take this opportunity to express 
their appreciation of the work of the late board and 
especially of the work of their editor-in-chief. The 
firm basis that the College Signal now rests upon 
and the reputation It now enjoys is mainly due to 
the • conscientious efforts. If we can leave the 
Signal next year and feel that we have equalled their 
work we shall have ample reason to be satisfied with 
what we have done. 



ADVANTAGES OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

One reason, perhaps, why our college has no more 
students is because the people of New England do not 
know or do not realize what opportunities are offered 
here. 

First of all, the location is one to be envied by any 
institution ; situated in one of the prettiest and health- 
iest spots In the state, and easily accessible by train, 
we have a most desirable place for a college. More 
than one old and honored university is gradually loos- 
ing Its popularity because of its unfavorable location. 



To be sure there are many disadvantages here as 
at all small colleges, but there are advantages also ; 
a student coming here, while he does not meet as 
many fellows as he would at a larger school, does with- 
out doubt make as many and as helpful friendships ; 
he can receive more individual attention from his 
instructors ; he has a greater opportunity to become a' 
leader among his associates. 

Certain courses offered here are acknowledged to 
be the best in the country, and the best informed men 
are conducting these courses, nearly every department 
is equipped with all things necessary to make the 
course practical and complete. The positions secured 
by our graduates as Entomologists, Chemists, Farm 
Superintendents, etc. show what a thorough and bene- 
ficial training is given here. 

The fact that our athletic assciation Is laboring to 
develop strong athletic teams should be an attraction 
to all interested in this phase of college life ; the suc- 
cess of these teams in previous years has helped to 
raise the standard of our college, and has made it 
better known. 

But how many of the present students realize these 
advantages offered them ? And how can the public 
be expected to realize them if we do not ? Would It 
not be well for each one connected with this college 
to make it his duty to show all New Englanders that 
Massachusetts supports an institution that is doing 
something for its students, and that it wants to do the 
same for three hundred instead of a hundred and 
fifty ? 

/Uhlctic N<>**s 

BASEBALL. 

The baseball squad which has been doing indoor 
work for the last couple of weeks has shown marked 
improvement. This is noticed especially along the 
batting line where the men are meeting the ball 
squarely and hard. The work of the freshmen candi- 
dates la very encouraging. They take a hold in an 
apt manner but have a tendency to fool away the 
practise. This however might be overlooked to a 
certain extent on the part of a freshman. It is hoped 
however that more seriousness will be shown in the 
work from now on. With the present weather con- 



ditions the squad should be able to get outside In 
another week. The out-field candidates will then be 
given a chance to show their ability. 



FOOTBALL. 

As soon as the weather breaks up sufficiently 
Captain Craighead wishes to get all of the new foot- 
ball material out for preliminary practise. The ele- 
ments of the game will be taught and the men 
will be given an idea of what is expected 
of them. The class of 1905 will leave sev- 
eral vacancies on the team Here is the chance 
for such men who take an interest In the game. If 
you are among these or have the physical build neces- 
sary the college needs you. The man who Is In 
earnest is the man who gets the place. 



TRACK ATHLETICS FOR M. A. C. 

As the spring season approaches and the ground 
shows signs of drying, our minds wander from the 
books we love so well and turn towards other things. 
Spring athletics with all their possibilities are upon 
us. For some baseball has its attractions, for others 
the track. Alas, we have no track but we have a 
track committee and for 12 long years has that com- 
mittee existed but as yet, no track has appeared. It 
seems a pity that there is no adequate place for the 
developing of the latent track material that this col- 
lege possesses. 

We have men, lots of them, with more than the 
average ability to contest in track athletics but they 
may as well be elsewheres so far as their abilities 
advance the standing of the college along such lines. 
On the few occasions, woefully few, when a team was 
organized they won everything, were invincible. Shall 
we be content with these few meagre attempts or 
shall we take up and utilize that which we possess in 
abundance, fine track material ! 

Granted that we have the material, the question 
arises, can we support the team ? This, the financial 
side, at once appeals to us all. Some say, and with 
reason, that we cannot support both a track and base- 
ball team. If such be the case, the question then is ; 
which, the track, or the diamond ? The track, by all 
means, the track. 

When a man is considering to what college he will 
go besides the courses of instruction he also con- 



siders Its athletics, its teams and the nature of the 
sports in which they contest. Into the latter the per- 
sonal consideration enters, he asks which do I stand 
the better show in? Obviously the one giving the 
greatest variety of achievement and the largest number 
of contestants. It Is far easier to make a team com- 
posed, sometimes of thirty, than a team where the 
number is unchangingly fixed at nine. Among the 
numerous events making up a meet one Is very apt 
to find one in which by training he can excel. While 
many, in spite of all. cannot attain to the most meager 
success as a ball player. Many are deterred from 
coming out for baseball on account of the time taken 
from their studies entailed by the regular practice. 
Now regular practice never will hurt one out for the 
track for It Is a fact that effectual track practice can 
be taken In spare moments and result In efficiency that 
could not be attained in baseball by the same sort of 
practice. The track contests giving opportunity as 
they do for more to contest, will interest more of the 
student body and thus assure greater support. 

The majority of men inquiring about a college 
invariably ask if it has a track team, many have gone 
elsewheres than here on this account alone. This 
being the case the thing is to correct it and estab- 
lish a track team and then to reap the results that Its 
advertising will surely bring. 

To be conservant is no crime and let us be so in 
this case. Success will not be gained by a sudden 
abandoning of one and embracing of the other, but 
while holding to what we have and developing to our 
best, its possibilities, let us at the same time gradually 
build up a track team. Then if we cannot support 
both we shall have a well developed.notan undeveloped 
team to use as an effectual means of advertisement. 
The quickest way to attain this is by Interciass con- 
tests. They are the more to be desired here because 
as yet no regular team exists and by them we can 
find out who's who on the track. One class has 
already taken steps in this line : let others follow and 
soon. " we'll raise Old Bay State to the highest." in 
a way to make our rivals tremble. 

Up to this time we have been dependent on the 
courtesy of Amherst College for the use of a track. 
Whether or not this shall continue lies within our 
power. Let every man use his utmost influence for a 
track — we need it — we can turn out a team worthy of 



I 




1 12 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"3 






It — to get It is our aim. It need not be expensive — 
the land once attained, all can assist.and by the use of 
the implements already possessed we can make one 
to meet our every want. 

For twelve years has this monster defied us. let us 
awake and vanquish it and let no stone lie unturned 
until our purpose is accomplished. 



THE PRESS CLUB. 

During the past month publicity has been thrust 
upon us by the unfortunate affair which we all hope is 
now ended. The papers throughout the country have 
brought the college into public notice by their many- 
sided versions of our affair. Journals which have 
never before granted us the smallest space for athletic 
or social news have now devoted whole columns to 
our institution. We have figured prominently in the 
editorial pages and many a sporting reporter has taken 
this opportunity to fill his sensational columns with 
bogus •• interviews." For the most part the college 
has fared badly in the hands of these newspapers ; the 
trustees have been censured, the faculty has been 
made the object of derision, and the senior class has 
received the worst possible abuse. This maltreat 
ment has not been confined to the so-called " yellow- 
journals " but has extended to those papers from 
which we have a right to expect better. The Boston 
Transcript, a paper which has. without doubt, the 
most intellectual readers of any daily in New England. 
I ^s been particularly insulting. Their editorial col- 
i mM have, from day to day. contained sarcastic and 
offensive remarks which, though entirely uncalled for, 
will do much to hurt the good name of the college 
with those who do not know its full history. 

Dishonorable and untruthful as these accounts have 
been, not one of us has exerted himself to refute 
them ; the student body has stood Idly by and seen its 
Alma Mater attacked without showing the least signs 
of defence. In looking about for the cause of this 
seeming indifference we find that it is not from lack 
of Interest in the college, but rather from the absence 
of an organization to which we could appeal for advice 
and support in the matter of newspaper writings. 
Every college of any importance has. as one of its 
most influential societies, a press club, and of such a 
club we stand very much in need. A college which 
depends on advertising for its success is not in much 



danger of obtaining it, nevertheless the newspapers 
are now the most potent means of bringing success to 
public notice, and it is this which we desire. 

Realizing the need of such an organization, the 
president of the junior class has appointed a commit- 
tee to take action towards establishing a press club. 
This is not a very new idea, by any means, for many 
of the preceding classes have tried the same thing, 
but in late years it has always proved a failure on 
account of lack of support from the undergraduates. 
The time is now ripe for a successful organization 
and we hope this committee will have better success 
than its predecessors have had. To insure this suc- 
cess the hearty support of every student should be 
given It. T., '06. 



PROPOSED CHANGE IN REUNION SYSTEM. 

An alteration in the system of alumni reunions has 
been proposed by Edwin Dix of the class of '8 1 of 
Princeton. The alumni of Princeton and also of 
Cornell have agitated this new sytem and we believe 
that the alumni of Massachusetts would do well to 
consider it. The system in vogue with our alumni is 
as follows. Three years after graduation a class 
holds its first reunion during commencement week 
here in Amherst, and the reunions after this occur at 
Intervals of five years. One can readily see by this 
scheme that there will be held reunions of classes 
during the same year that may have been ten or 
fifteen years apart If we consider the years of gradua- 
tion. The new idea is to do away with the present 
plan of holding reunions of isolated classes separated 
from one another by five year intervals, and to sub- 
stitute a schedule by which the graduates shall unite 
in groups so that four classes which were In college 
together shall all return to their Alma Mater in the 
same year. 

The accompanying schedule is the one devised by 
Mr. Dix and later adopted by Cornell, with some slight 
modifications to adapt it to M. A. C. It shows how 
the proposed plan would work out. The groups of four 
alter the r make-up by one class at each separate 
successive reunion : '88. '87. '86 and '85 for instance, 
coming together in 1906; '87. '86, '85 and '84 in 
1911 ; '86. '85, '84. '83 in 1916 ; and "85. '84. '83. 
and '82 in 1921. There Is thus a cycle of nineteen 
years during which each class has four reunions ; the 



Schedule of a Proposed New System for Class Reunions. 

























191i 

> 

• 16 

14 

"\2 


19U 

r 

• 17 

15* 
13' 


18 
16 
14 


192 

1920 

» 20 

■ 19 .... 

.... 18 

17 .... 

.... 16 

15 .... 


192; 



21 

1*9 

*i7" 


192. 
> 

■ 22 

'26' 

18' 


1926 
1925 

!l924 25 

3 24 .... 

i 23 .... 23 

.... 22 .... 

21 .... 21 

!.... 20 .... 

19 .... 19 


;i9i£ 


19K 
15 
13' 
11 


















1914 
13 

ii 

09 - 


14 

"\2 

"lO 


.... 


15 
14 
13 
12 










1913 
12 

io' 

08' 










1912 
11 

















1911 




12 

11 
10 
09 










1910 
09 
07' 

'65' 








11 
10 








1909 
08 
06' 

'64' 


10 .... 




















1908 
07 
05 - 

'63' 


6b" 

06 


09 
'67' 










09 
I 08 

1 






1906 
05 
03 
0! ' 


1907 
06 
64' 
02 


08 
07 
06 








08 
07 
06 
05 


























07 
06 
05 
04 


03 
02 
01 
00 






















05 
04 
03 
02 
















05 
04 
















04 
03 
02 
01 


































02 
01 

00 

99 






































01 
00 
99 
98 
















00 
























00 
99 
98 
97 


' 




99 
98 
97 
96 








































98 
97 
96 
95 






















.... 
















97 
96 
95 
94 


































96 
95 
94 
93 








95 
94 
93 
92 










































94 
93 
92 
91 




































93 
92 
91 
90 














(92) 
(91) 




















92 
91 

90 
89 






91 

90 
89 
88 








90 
89 
88 
87 














































89 
88 
87 
86 








88 
87 
86 
85 


84" 
83 
82 
81 


H 






















87 








87 
86 
85 
84 
















R6 
















R6 
















M 


















85 ! 
84 1 








85 
84 
83 
fi? 










84 
83 
82 
81 






































83 
82 
81 
80 








83 




































82 
81 
80 
79 


































81 
80 
79 
78 










80 
79 
78 
77 


































79 
78 

77 
76 




































78 
77 
76 
75 










































77 
76 
75 








(76) 




76 
75 
74 
73 








































75 
74 
73 
72 

(71) 










































74 
73 
72 
71 












































73 
72 
71 . 








(72) 

(71) 




72 
71 
























































; 1 














1 







ii4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Intervals being five. five. five, and four years, instead 
of every five years as now. It might seem best not 
to extend the JJnew schedule to the younger classes 
until a given period after they leave college. 
The Cornell Daily Sun says : 
••It will be seen that the order of classes when '85 
was the Freshmen class occur in 1906; and the 
order would succeed step by step until, in 1921, the 
arrangement when '85 was the Senior class would 
occur. The peculiar benefit of the proposed system 
is thus evident. Of course, it is understood that the 
classes would not convene together — that is. there is 
no proposition to interfere with the present reunions of 
the separate classes. 

The schedule can meet with few objections after it 
has been in effect for a few years. At first certain 
classes might be inconvenienced in changing from the 
regular date to a year awkwardly near or far distant. A 
special reunion or a postponement could remedy 
this. The old system of even -number anniversaries 
would be done away with,— that is. instead of a class 
convening In 1915. 1920. 1925. 1930. etc.. It would 
meet every five, five, five and four years, a mathe- 
matical necessity in order to permit the variable 
arrangement. This loss of the distinguished year is 
really inconsequent in comparison with the pleasant 
meetings possibly under the new arrangement." 
The Cornell Alumni News says of the proposed 

change : 

• It must be admitted that the reunion plan now In 
lorce Is open to the serious objection that It prevents 
the ■ grads ' from ever meeting anybody at the reun- 
ions except members of their own class. Now a 
man's classmates comprise only a third or a half of 
his college friends. The others are In the six classes 
Immediately above and below his own. including the 
three classes that he finds here when he enters the 
University and the three that he leaves here when he 
departs. This is a fact well known to all. 

•• Under the present system, a returning ■ grad ' 
who attends faithfully the successive reunions of his 
class finds always the same ' bunch ' of alumni in 
Ithaca at those times. There are his own classmates, 
and the classes on each side separated from his own 
by five year Intervals. His college friends who were 
sophomores or seniors when he was a junior he may 
go through life without ever meeting again." 



More will be said concerning this in a later issue. 
In the meantime we hope the M. A. C. alumni will 
interest themselves in this scheme. 



College f*ot*s- 



— Colton, '06. was visited by his father last week. 

Taft. '06. was called home recently by the 

death of his mother. 

— Suhlke. '06 has returned after two weeks testing 
for Professor Cooley. 

—Newton. '04. now taking P. G. work at Yale, 
visited In Amherst lately. 

Acting President Brooks gave a talk before the 

Y. M. C. A. Thursday evening. 

The freshman class elected Cobb as baseball 

captain, and Warner as manager. 

The sophomore class has elected Clark as their 

baseball captain, and Hlgglns, manager. 

j. f. Lyman. '05, went to Bowdoln Saturday to 

assist initiation at the Alpha Rho chapter of Kappa 
Sigma. 

—Austin, '08, who has been testing cattle for 
advanced registry at Princeton, for the experiment 
station, has returned to college. 

—The new catalogue Is out. According to it we 
have 267 students now in college, representing 13 
different states and four nationalities. 

A committee from the junior class consisting of 

Wholley. Tannatt and Carpenter, has been appointed 
to plan the organization of a Press club. 

p ro f. Geo. O. Greene, Kansas. '00, has an 

article in the Jayhawker, the Kansas alumni paper, 
entitled " The College Man of the East and West. 

p ro f. Cooley took the short course to Barre 

recently where the participated in a prize judging con- 
test of Jerseys, conducted on the farm of Mr. Ellis. 
In the evening they were treated to a banquet. 

—The freshmen class have organized a track 
team with K. E. Glllett as captain and M. M. 
Browne as manager. The object is to arouse 
interest in track athletics. It Is their intention to 
arrange a meet with the Amherst freshmen if 
possible. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"5 



— President Goodell has arrived at Fort Pierce, 
Florida. His many friends among the Alumni and 
in Amherst will be glad to learn that he bore his 
journey better than was expected, and that he is at 
present resting comfortably. 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

It is with no little satisfaction that we welcome 
spring after the long winter. In a short time the 
familiar songs will be heard on the banks of South 
College and M. A. C. will present a far different 
aspect than for some months past. With the new 
life that is so plainly seen stirring in every bud and 
blade there should come an ambition in everyone of us 
to work harder for the sake of our college. This 
year above all others we should work hard for every- 
thing that pertains to the advancement of Old Massa- 
chusetts. It is rather early for " spring fever," yet Its 
ravages are being felt by some already. The best 
preventative and also remedy is a more diligent appli- 
cation to one's text-books. 

* * * * • 

A feeling of individual independence and selfishness, 
that is much to be regretted, is making its appearance 
in one of the classes now in college. There can be 
nothing but harm resulting from this. It will lead, 
and is leading, toward a breaking up of class friend- 
ship and class loyalty that is so admirably shown in 
our senior class. The desires of a few or any per- 
sonal feelings one has should give way to the majority. 
Success as a class can come in no other way. The 
Autocrat hopes that the members of the class In 
question will receive this as it is given, with a view of 
promoting the best interests and welfare of their class. 

>•■ 

IS A COLLEGE COURSE A WASTE OE TIME ? 

For ninety men out of one hundred, there is but one 
answer to this question. These ninety are of th- rank 
and file of college men, and while some get more, and 
some less, out of their course, not one can say that 
his conditions are not materially improved by four years 
of college training. 

In this class the majority may be left out of the 
discussion; in their case there is no question, no chance 
for an argument, and upon them rests the responsl 
billty of showing to the world the advantage of a college 
education. 



But what of the other ten } 

Here comes a question, and a difficult one. Nine 
of them are sons of wealthy or well-to-do parents ; 
men who have no particular desire for fame for the 
simple reasons that it requires too much effort to attain 
it. and that they are sure of an easy, comfortable life 
without it. 

This class of men go to college • ' for the sake of 
what fun they can get out of It." and they get the fun 
every time, but do they get any lasting benefit ? 

I think they do. Of course it is small when com- 
pared with the benefit derived by those who do earnest, 
conscientious work; but I don't believe that any bright, 
fullwitted man can live four years of college life,— as 
college life Is today — without learning some lessons, 
which although they do not come from books or pro- 
fessors, are sure to be of some use to him in after life. 
So, taking into consideration the life which these 
men would be apt to lead for those four years, were 
they not In college, we can hardly say that their time 
is wasted. 

That disposes of ninety-nine ; and now let us con 
sider the hundredth. 

This is the man who has neither parents nor money 
to ease him along ; who has already a good position 
at fair pay, and a chance for promotion in the future. 
Will he not stop and think for some time before he 
stakes what little hard-earned money he may have, 
and four of the best years of his life, upon something 
which may bring him neither riches nor happiness ? 

All depends upon a man's disposition and tempera- 
ment. The ambitious man with a quick nervous tem- 
perament, must always be working at something, 
striving for something, learning something ; always 
weary of the old and eager for the new. Such a man 
cannot waste the time spent at college. The mere 
work which he does, though he may never see any 
practical results from it. is just as necessary to him 
as his daily food and no matter if he die a pauper his 
time has not been wasted. 

On the other hand is the cool, phlegmatic, easy- 
going man, of mediocre ability and limited ambitions. 
While his ambitious, high strung brother is toiling and 
digging in college, he is working along easily and play- 
ing his cards for a " snap " along other lines. 

He usually gets it, and just when the college man 
is getting into the hardest, most strenuous part of his 









n6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



career. — trying to make his record in the world equal 
his record in college. — the ignoramus begins to smoke 
imported cigars and take things easy generally. 

There are hundreds of such men in the country 
today and what a waste of time a college education 
would mean to them ! 

And so the answer to our question depends upon 
many things : men. surroundings, circumstances, etc ; 
but in the greater number of cases, the college course 
is most decidedly not a waste of time. 

F. O. S.. ex-'06. 



COLLEGE : CLASSICAL OR TECHNICAL. 

The great question confronting a man after gradu- 
ating from high school is whether he shall attend a 
classical or technical college. The many arguments 
brought up by both sides many times leave the young 
man In doubt' 

Supporters of classical colleges claim that classical 
studies are necessary to turn out well rounded men. 
When a man has received a classical education, it is 
then time to specialize. In short, they claim the 
making of the man and then the specialist. 

The platform of the technical school is more com- 
plicated, inasmuch as it undertakes the making of the 
man and the specialist at the same time. Its course 
of industrial training is adapted first and mainly to the 
needs of the business world. And the crying need of 
the hour is for the trained specialist, who is a man of 
cu i ire as well. This is what the trade schools 
endeavor to turn out. and this is the product of the 
best of them. 

Now to turn from the schools and their manage- 
ment to the students who attend them. With most 
people work Is compulsory. With a few a life of 
work or one of leisure is a matter of choice. For the 
latter, the classical college is better. Of the first 
division the greater part can never obtain higher edu- 
cation of any kind. The remainder, represented by 
the man of moderate means, cannot afford to send 
their sons through a classical college and supplement 
this training by sending them then to a professional 
school. The young man must have ended his educa- 
tion and become a wage-earner at twenty-two or 
twenty-three. The four years of classical study 
would retard him just four years. Classical schooling, 
then, is out of the question because first, he cannot 



afford the expense, second, his duty to his family, to 
help support them he must work. It is clear that this 
class is barred from the extended classical training 
and is best served by the technical school. 

The great advantage of technical over classical 
education is, then, that it offers the best training for 
one's life work, with sufficient culture to the greatest 
number of people. W. f '08. 

MODERN EDUCATION. 

In my native town there is a certain cross-roads 
which goes by the name of " The Brlck-Schoolhouse 
Corner." It is isolated, with only two houses in sight, 
and only a picturesque view of some distant Rhode 
Island hills to commend itself to the aesthetic sense. 
Yet here was located for fifty or sixty years one of the 
famous district schools. Although it was long ago 
discontinued an older generation has handed down the 
name as a memorial of its good work. When we 
consider the large number of famous men and women 
produced by these schools we may well pause and ask 
if our modern school systems are after all so much in 
advance of the older methods. 

In those days, arithmetic was taught in a primitive 
manner, possibly, but the results were far more satis- 
factory than at present. Reading and especially 
spelling, which a Boston paper, a few days ago. 
declared should be taught in colleges, were then 
taught with far more accuracy than today. Thus the 
graduate of the district school was in these branches 
better equipped than most grammar school graduates 
today. On this fundamental basis the district school 
was laid, and while it ascended to higher subjects It 
always kept in view the essentials of education. 

All this is changed now. In our high, and particu- 
larly in the grammar schools, pupils are obliged to 
take up all sorts of fanciful subjects and the more 
essential ones are forced into the background. A 
variety of impractical ideas are put into the course of 
study and as a result many of our high school gradu- 
ates can scarcely express themselves In a readable 
form upon paper, while the solution of an arithmetical 
problem is an unattainable feat. Pupils in the gram- 
mar schools are forced to study the history and even 
the language of foreign nations when they are unac- 
quainted with their own, and still the powers behind 
are pushing yet harder. They say this is Progress. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



xi7 



This may be an extreme view but prominent edu- 
cators have at last realized that, as always is the case, 
the wave of reform in educational matters has gone 
too far. We must in the lower grades have more of 
the concrete and less of the general. No one wishes 
for an actual return of the lonely school-house on the 
bleak country corner to which little children must 
tramp dally, eat cold dinners and remain all day in 
unhealthful buildings. Rather do we desire the mod- 
ern central school-house to which pupils of the out- 
lying districts can be conveyed by the town authori- 
ties. But with all these advantages we must ask for 
a judicious rearrangement of studies, leaving to the 
higher schools and colleges the more advanced sub- 
jects. Then and only then can we expect to reap the 
greatest value from a common school education. 
Then our higher institutions can take up the work 
where the local schools have left it. developing and 
broadening both mind and body toward that ideal for 
which we all are striving. K., '07. 



THEATER ATTRACTIONS. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

March 20 and week, Frankle Carpenter. 

27, Maxlne Elliott in " Her Own Way." 
31, " Peggy from Paris." 

EMPIRE THEATRE. 

March 22, Out of the Fold. 

23, 24, 25, The Gypsy Girl. 

30. 31, April 1, Imperial Burlesquers. 



Dfp&rtmtrvf [Sloths. 



AGRICULTURE. 
The short course students in dairying completed 
their ten weeks course last Wednesday. In the morn- 
ing, visitors were invited to the dairy room at the col- 
lege barn where the students gave an exhibition of the 
practical work they have been doing in milk testing, 
separating and butter making. At eleven o'clock the 
usual farmers' institute was held in the chapel under 
the joint management of the state board of agricul- 
ture the Hampshire agricultural society and the col- 
lege. Two of the best institute speakers in 
New England were engaged and they fully lived up to 
their reputation. 



In the morning session Prof. J. L. Hills, director of 
the Experiment Station at Burlington. Vermont and a 
graduate of Massachusetts in '81, spoke in a very 
interesting and instructive way on "Dairy Insurance 
Policies". The subject was not treated literally but. 
In a metaphorical way, he spoke of insurance which 
costs the farmer nothing but gumption and energy, and 
protects the crops and products from loss.thus bringing 
a sure balance on the right side of the accounts. The 
lecture was much enjoyed by the large audience of 
men from all parts of the state. After an interest- 
ing and lively discussion through questions, the meet- 
ing was adjourned for dinner in the new dining hall. 

At two o'clock Professor Brooks introduced as the 
afternoon speaker, Professor Sanborn of Gilmanton, 
N. H.. who spoke on •• Results of a Decade of 
Extensive Intensive Agriculture." He related his 
personal experience and wonderful success in farming 
on his ancestral homestead in New Hampshire. 
This once run-down, poorly situated and heavily 
mortgaged hill farm, which he has rapidly improved 
and increased in size and value, today yields a larger 
Income than the college presidency would, which Mr. 
Sanborn refused when he returned to the old home. 
He places very high estimates on the possibilities of 
New England agriculture and believes the future Is 
bright for well trained young men who Intend to 
follow that noble occupation. The lecture was almost 
like a romance and any young man who listened to It 
could not help being Inspired. Questions and answers 
followed In the customary way and here again the 
speaker showed his thorough knowledge of up-to-date 
scientific agriculture. 

In the evening the annual short course banquet was 
served in Draper Hall. Prizes given for general 
excellence by the Massachusetts society for the pro- 
motion of agriculture Htare captured by William E. 
Salmon, of Boston, $50 ; C. M. Carruth of Barre, 
$30; and Eugene A. R. Schmidt of Shirley, $20- 
For the best knowledge of fertilizers on the farm, the 
prize offered by W. H. Bowker of Boston was taken 
by E. A. R. Schmidt. Another special prize offered 
by B. von Herff of N. Y. for the best knowledge of 
fertilizers on grass land was won by O. H. Gates of 
Ashburnham. Of the prizes offered by the Massa- 
chusetts society for promoting agriculture, for highest 







xi8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



scoring butter. C. N. V. Greenhalge of Plymouth won 
the first of $25 on a score of 96 I -2 ; the second of 
$15 was won by J. B. Lucia of Middlebury. Vt., 
scoring 96 1-4 ; the third of $10 was taken by H, R. 
Carter of Millbury, who scored 96. In the stock 
judging contests prizes given by the same society 
were awarded to M. A. Smith of Berlin, N. Y. first ; 
C. M. Carruth of Barre second, and W. H. Ranney 
of South Ashfield third. 



Alu 



mm. 



ALUMNI NOTICE. 

Now that a new board of editors has been chosen 
to manage the Sicnal, it might not be out of place 
to say a few words as to the way in which it is hoped 
to run this department of the paper in the future. 
We hope to make it, if possible, of more interest and 
value to the alumni than it has been in previous 
years. We hope to keep in touch with the doings of 
all the alumni, and keep them interested in the 
college, itself. A large number of them do keep 
informed of what is going on here, and have helped 
greatly in supporting the paper, athletics, and other 
worthy causes ; and to these we wish to express our 
heartfelt gratitude. There are many others, however, 
who seem almost to have forgotten " old Mass'chus- 
etts," so little do they do for the institution and so rarely 
are they heard from. It is with these, especially, 
that we would plead. This paper goes to members of 
MKf class that has graduated from this college, 
having, by the way, a circulation within twenty-five as 
large as that of the Amherst Student. Now everyone 
of these men must be interested In the other mem- 
bers of his class. Therefore, whenever anyone has 
anything of interest to relate, which has happened, is 
happening, or is about to happen to him. it behooves 
him to notify either the Alumni Editor, or the Editor- 
in-Chief of this paper. All such communications will 
be joyfully received. 

'82. S. C. Damon of Lancaster, has removed to 
Chadbourne, S. C. 



Yale graduates connected with the Yale Co-opera- 
tive society are making plans to form a corporation 
with a capital of $30,000. and extend the system to 
other universities and colleges. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Of the class of 1906 on the death of Mrs. Mary Taft. mother 
of our classmate, William Otis Taft. 

Wheteas, God in his infinite wisdom has removed from this 
material life. Mrs, Mary Taft, mother of our classmate 
William Otis Taft. be it 

Resolved. That we. the class of 1906 wish to extend our 
sympathy to our classmate and to the bereaved family. And 
be it further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to him 
and his family ; also, that these resolutions be published in the 
next issue of the College Signal. 

G. Talbot French, 1 

Stanley S. Rogers, > For the Class. 

Ralph W. Peakes. ) 



Wh&reas it has pleased our Heavenly Father to take unt° 
himself the mother of our beloved friend and brother William 
O. Taft be it 

Resolved. That we the members of the C. S. C. do hereby 
extend our heartfelt sympathy to him and his family in their 
bereavement and further be it 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to him 
and his family and that a copy be published in the College 
Signal. 



Frank H. Kennedy, 
Ernest H. Lincoln. 
Louis H. Moseley, 



For the Fraternity. 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment .*. .*. 

THAT'S US. 



Haynes & Co., 



SPRINGFIELD, 



Always Reliable. 



Mass 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




119 



Columbia wiil abolish its graduation thesis after this 
year. 

As a result of the mid-year exams, at Cornel). 10 1 
men have been dropped. 

The employment bureau at the University of Chicago 
has secured for students over $6,000 worth of work. 

C. C Pringh has recently made an addition of 
25,000 botanical specimens to the herbarium of the 
University of Vermont. 

Yale and Princeton will meet at the Brookline 
chess club for the first dual chess match ever held 
between the two Institutions. 

The faculty of Illinois are planning to give the edi- 
tor of the college paper four hours, and his assistants, 
three hours of university credit. 

The University of Minnesota has a basketball team 
composed of faculty members that can defeat any 
team of undergraduates in that institution. 

Purdue received as a gift, a collection of telephone 
apparatus, showing the development of the telephone 
system, which was on exhibition at St. Louis. 

The graduate students in English at Columbia uni- 
versity have undertaken the publication of a scholarly 
magazine entitled the English Graduate Record. 

Princeton is to have a new dormitory, given by the 
alumni of the classes from 1892 to 1901 Inclusive. 
The building will have ten entrances, one named for 
each class. 

Harvard. Yale. Pennsylvania. Columbia, Cornell. 
West Point and Annapolis, will be represented at the 
intercollegiate fencing tournament to be held in New 
York on March 24 and 25. 

Fifty-one girls of Wellesley college have failed to 
get permission to ride to church on Sunday on the 
trolley cars, and their case has been taken up by the 
Wellesley Hills alliance, an organization within the 
Wellesley Hllis Unitarian church. 

Cambridge university graduates voted on the ques- 
tion of the abolition of compulsory Greek in examina- 
tions. The result declared shows that the proposal to 
abolish Greek was rejected by 1559 votes to 1052. 
Premier Balfour voted In favor of compulsory Greek. 



Regais in Quarter Sizes 

Pit any foot. 

J. J. GARDNER, Agent, 

12 South College. 



Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 
Amherst, Mass. 



E. D. Philrrick, '07. 



Edwards, '08. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 






AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 



120 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Holy Cross may discontinue Its basketball team 
next year on account of its inability to support itself. 

Vassar college has decided to increase its annual 
charge from $400, the rate which has prevailed since 
1866. to $500. Of this, $150 will be the fee for 
tuition. The new rates will go Into effect for the class 
entering in September, 1905, but will not apply to 
students now in college. 

President Woodrow Wilson has announced that 
Princeton university is now practically assured of hav- 
ing one of her most pressing needs gratified in the 
form of a new recitation hall. The new structure will 
probably cost about $100,000, and will be in the same 
Gothic style of architecture as the other recent build- 
ings on the campus. 

The University of Vermont has received word that 
a station of the weather bureau, and probably an obser- 
atory for meteorological purposes, will be established 
at Burlington on the university grounds. A director, 
two observers, and a student assistant will be attached 
to the station. The proposed building is to have a 
frontage of 36 feet and a depth of 46 feet. It will 
be built of brick, of two stories, with a basement, and 
surmounted by a tower of moderate height. It is 
believed that the station will add to the value of the 
scientific work of the university. 



Hmberst Ibouse, 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENORICK, PdOMlfTO*. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 



'i 



The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Gayer Hats and A. B. Klrsch- 

baura & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN awd H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON <£ THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 






WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 




PHOTOGRAPHE 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 19. 1905. 



NO. 11 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collbob Sional, Amherst Mass Thb Siohal will be 
sent to aU subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS, JR.. 1906. Editor-In Chief. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES. 1 906. Business Manager. 

EDWIN DANIELS PHILBR1CK, 1907. Assistant Business Manager 
CHARLES WALTER CARPENTER. 1906. Department Notes. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT. 1906 Intercollegiate 

WILLARD COLBURN TANNATT, JR.. 1906. College Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS. 1907 Alumni Notes 

EARLE COODMAN BARTLETT. 1907. Athletics. CLINTON KING 1907 ' 

HERBERT LINWOOD WHITE. 1908. MARCUS METCALF BROWNE, 1908. 



Torino, »l.oo per gear in adcanco. Single Copies, 10c. Porta go oaf ido of United States and Canada, Bse. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association, 



L. H. Moseley, Pres. 
R. W. Peakes. Manager. 
W. A. Munson, Pres. 
J. E. Martin, Sec. 
Basket-ball Association, 



A. T 



Athletic Association. 

Base- Ball Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Seven Index. 

Fraternity Conference, 

Hastings, Manager. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 

W. O. Taft, Managet . 

M. H.Clark. Manager. 

C. W. Patch, Pres. 



Entered as secend-ciass matter, Poet Office at Amherst. 



Editorials. 



At a recent meeting of the Board the matter of 
changing the cover design of the Signal was brought 
up. After much discussion and argument the present 
design was adopted. Our reasons for the change are 
many. We believe that the former design was inap- 
propriate to what we desire the Sicnal to be : namely, 
a college newspaper. For such a paper nothing but 
a simple straightforward design is needed and not one 
that suggests a magazine or a high school paper. We 
place it in your hands trusting that the reasons for 
the change will be appreciated, and whatever criticism 
is felt to be just will be promptly communicated to 
the Board. 



ness, are not taking the paper but will desire to if it is 
brought to their notice. But what we most ardently 
desire is that each and every alumnus will send us 
whatever he thinks will be of interest to other alumni 
or to the students now in college. Whatever you see 
in any dally paper concerning the college or Its work, 
whatever you have to suggest, any criticism you wish 
to offer, any communications to be published, or what 
you are doing yourself, we most earnestly ask you for. 
If we can obtain your willing co-operation we shall be 
able to publish a paper that will be far more interest- 
ing and helpful. 



In order to promote greater interest among the 
alumni toward our college paper we shall send a copy 
of this Signal to every alumnus whose address we 
can obtain. We hope as a result to strike many who. 
probably more through carelessness than thoughtless- 



We quote the following from the Amherst Record 
of April 5. The sentiments expressed In It are highly 
deserving of our greatest praise. We trust that many 
of the leading papers of New England, especially the 
Boston Transcript and the Northampton Herald will 
take notice and profit by it. " Some of the reports 
and comments concerning the troubles between the 
students and faculty at the Agricultural college which 
have appeared In New York and Boston papers have 









122 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



been amusing, some have been malicious, some have 
been manifestly untrue and slanderous. We have 
refrained from commenting on these articles In the 
belief that the best interests of the college are opposed 
to any further stirring up of an unfortunate situation, 
which cannot be improved by any amount of news- 
paper discussion, however friendly or intelligent. But 
we must admit surprise at reading in the columns of 
a New York newspaper which has a large circulation 
in New England that the college appropriation bill has 
been held up in the Legislature through influence 
exerted on that body by undergraduates of the college. 
As Artemas Ward would have said, ■ This is 2 
mutch.' " 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



SENIORS BACK. 

The entire senior class is with us again. The 
reasons for their leaving as they did is well known 
to all, so only a brief account of the trouble need be 
given. A serious breach of college discipline 
occurred In which nearly all the members of the 
senior class were concerned. The matter was brought 
before the discipline committee who, after a careful 
deliberation decided to require a public apology from 
the class and the suspension for one year of three of 
the members. Shortly after this a conference was 
held between the faculty, the discipline committee, 
and a committee from the senior class in which the 
class expressed regret for their action but believing 
that the whole class was equally to blame refused to 
give an apology and stated that they would with 
dra> in a body if the three men were not taken back. 
Here the local alumni took up the matter and after 
several meetings with the class, the class reconsid- 
ered their determination to leave college and offered 
a public apology both to the college and to the pro- 
fessor in whose class room the disturbance occurred. 
The seniors, however, believing that they had been 
wrongly treated, sold their furniture and personal belong- 
ings and left college. The faculty held numerous 
meetings but refused to take back the three sus- 
pended men, persisting to their decision. After the 
lapse of several days Acting President Brooks sent 
out the following letters to each man of the class : 
-In view of the statements published In many of the 
newspapers of yesterday to the effect that an ultima- 



tum had been Issued to the members of the class 
and that you are threatened with expulsion if you do 
not report to duty previous to March 16, I am writing 
to say that no Idea of expulsion Is to be Inferred from 
the letter that I have recently sent you ; that no vote 
of expulsion has been passed by the faculty and that 
I feel certain that no such vote will be passed, and I 
desire to say further that if the class, or a consider- 
able portion of the class, returns to college on or 
before March 16, there can be no reasonable doubt 
that such action will be taken in the very near future 
as will make it possible for the three suspended 
members of the class to secure reinstatements. I 
desire still further to say that members of the class 
who see fit to return to college will not be subjected 
to further discipline. The statements made in this 
letter are to be regarded as coming from the head of 
the college and not as the expression of my opinion 
as an individual. 

Sincerely Yours, 
William P. Brooks, Acting President 
Amherst, March II, 1905." 

This could have but one effect. The class returned 
and took up their regular duties a ; petition for clem- 
ency toward the three suspended members was sent 
in to the faculty. The members of the trustees held 
a fully attended meeting in the Amherst House on 
Friday, March 24, and the following resolutions were 
passed : 

"Whereas, the members of the senior class now 
attending their college work have petitioned the 
faculty for clemency toward three of their associates 
now under suspension, and have afforded satisfactory 
assurances that they have resumed their work in the 
spirit of loyalty and good faith; and whereas the 
faculty have referred their petition to this board with- 
out reservations : Now, therefore, be it resolved, that 
we Indorse the action of the faculty In the disciplinary 
measures recently taken by It toward the said mem- 
bers of the senior class, and second, that In considera- 
tion of the assurances tendered by them, the students 
under suspension be allowed to resume their college 
work on the 4th of April next." 

Acting President Brooks then sent to each mem- 
ber under suspension a letter stating that they could 
resume their work. 



uj 



Athletic No-t«. 



BASEBALL. 

The prospects for a successful season this year are 
most encouraging. The squad is hard at work and is 
fast developing into form. Practise games with 
Amherst High and scrub games are brought in as 
much as possible. Patrick Bowler, who has been 
with the Springfield team of the Connecticut League, 
for four years has been engaged as coach. Captain 
Kennedy, Coach Bowler and Manager Taft are doing 
their utmost for a successful season and should 
receive the hearty and willing support of the students 
and alumni. Without their co-operation nothing can 
be hoped for— the students must pay the small tax 
that has been levied and the alumr.i should help as far 
as their means allow. It Is not simply the money In 
itself that helps but it is the feeling of interest and 
good will that goes with it. Enthusiasm and spirit on 
the part of the students, the faculty, and the alumni 
is what helps and what we must have. The presence 
of the undergraduates at the practise with constant 
cheering and encouragement will go far toward the 
hoped for conditions. The season closes with the 
game at Providence with Brown. We have been 
badly beaten both In football and basketball by Brown 
and now Is the time to even up. All the endeavors 
of the squad and all the Interest should center on this 
game. The squad now consists of the following : 

Captain Kennedy. '06, who pitched four years with 
Boston English High and captained during his senior 
year, and has been in the box for two years on the 
college team will do the twirling. Ingham, '05,who has 
played on the coliege team for the last three years 
will do the catching with Paglieryand Bates for substi- 
tutes. Hunt, '05, who has played three years on college 
teams will cover second base. Tlrrell,'06, who fielded 
last year, orCrosby,'05.will cover third base. Martin, 
'06 .who has played two years at short stop with the col- 
lege team will cover first base. Draper, '08, who has 
played out field for Worcester English High for three 
years will cover short stop. Cobb, '08,who pitched for 
Amherst High for four years and captained during his 
senior year will substitute Kennedy and field at other 
times. O'Grady,'08.who fielded four years for Holliston 



High and captained in his senior year, will cover 
left-field. The other candidates for out field position 
are. Chase. "08. who fielded for Swampscott High 
school for four years ; Shattuck, '08, who played 
infield for Pepperell High School for three years; 
Johnson, '08, who fielded last year for Westford 
Academy ; Shaw. '07, who played three years for 
Belmont High school ; and Bartlett, '08, who fielded 
last year for Amherst High. Following Is the 
schedule : — 

April 18. Wesleyan at Middletown. 
29, Holy Cross at Worcester. 
May 1 , Colby on the Campus. 
3, Trinity at Hartford. 

6, Exeter at Exeter. 

13, University of Rochester on the Campus. 
17, Springfield Training school on the Campus. 
20. Williams at Williamstown. 

22, Andover at Andover. 

23, Boston College at Boston. 

24, Colby at Watervllle. Me. 

31, Boston College on the Campus. 
June 3, Springfield T. S. at Sprlngfild. 

7. Brown at Providence. 



FOOTBALL. 

Football practice In the spring Is a new feature In 
our athletics, and there is no reason why it should not 
be had each year. Of course, the spring Is the time 
when baseball naturally receives the greatest Interest, 
but there are many men who do not play baseball, so 
why not direct their attention to football or some other 
branch of athletics and in that way keep the majority 
of the students Interested In some department of 
athletics. 

When It was first known that there was going to be 
spring practice, there were some who thought that It 
would be useless to try It. One reason was because 
It had never been tried here before. However, when 
the call for candidates was Issued last week, it was 
surprising to see such a large number come out, 
especially now, when there are so many other 
attractions. 

The work, in the first place, consists In learning the 
rudiments of the game, such as falling on the ball, 
tackling, and Instructing the •• line men " and the 






l 







ii 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"backs" in their positions. When these fundamental 
principles have been learned, we shall have some very 
good material to start the season with next fall. 

As we have had some very successful teams during 
the past three or four years, our greatest aim is to 
turn out a team as equally successful as in 1905. 
Certainly, it is not expected that the men as a team 
will know as much football as the team of the past 
season ; because our team last season was composed 
of men, the majority of whom had played together for 
three years or more. However, whether the team of 
1905 will know as much football or not, we shall try 
our utmost to turn out a team that will win. In order 
to do this we are beginning now and shall take advant- 
age of every opportunity to put a winning team on the 
field. We ask the hearty co-operation of all the 
alumni and students in working for this end. If we 
work together we will win. 

W. H. Craighead, Captain. 



The Bay State Agricultural society at their last 
annual meeting established a new prize to be called 
the J. D. W. French prize. The sum of $25 will be 
awarded, beginning with year 1905-1906 to the mem- 
ber of the senior class who shall present the best 
essay on " Forestry. " Mr. French, after whom the 
prize is named was formerly a trustee of the college 
and president of the New England Forestry Associa- 
tion. He was one of the founders of the Bay State 
Agricultural Society which was established for the 
purpose of promoting the science of agriculture in 
this state. Mr. French was an earnest, hard worker 
in his capacity as trustee, often visiting college and 
showing his interest by donations of gifts. 



THE NEW PRIZES. 

Notice of two new prizes for the college has been 
given. The conditions underlying them are as follows : 

An award to be given at each commencement for 
three years, commencing June, 1905, expiring June, 
1907, by the Western Alumni Aassociation of the 
M. A. C. 

A sum of $25 in cash to that member of the 
Sophomore class, who in the judgment of the commit- 
tees, to be hereafter mentioned, shall have shown 
durvg his two years in college, the greatest improve- 
ment In character, example, and scholarship. 

One month prior to commencement, the college 
senate will select three men from the sophomore 
class (none but full four year course men competing), 
who In their judgment best fulfill the terms of the 
award, giving equal weight to the three specifications, 
character, example, and scholarship. 

The three names of the men so chosen shall be 
forwarded to the faculty. 

The president is requested to appoint a committee 
of three, from the faculty, two of whom shall be 
sophomore teachers, to select one man out of the 
three whose names have been submitted by the 
College Senate, the man so chosen being in their 
judgement the best qualified to fulfill the conditions, 
under which this award Is given. 



COLLEGE APPROPRIATION. 

The trustees of the college gave a hearing !n the 
Town Hall, Amherst, March 24, to the farmers, gar- 
deners, and florists who considered themselves injured 
by the sale of the products of the farm and Horticul- 
tural departments In the retail markets of Amherst 
and vicinity. 

The opposition was aroused by a bill that had been 
brought before the present Legislature in which the 
trustees of the college asked for a grant of $1 16.000 
to the college, largely for greenhouses and equipment 
of the Horticultural department. This bill was 
referred to a joint committee of the Senate and 
House on Agriculture. Those opposed appeared 
before this committee and two hearings were given — 
one in Boston, at which hearing those in favor of the 
bill were heard. Messrs. Gleason, Ellis and Wheeler 
spoke for the trustees. Professors Brooks and Waugh 
and Dr. Fernald were given opportunity to present the 
needs of their departments. Those opposed merely 
stated that the opposition was not against the appro- 
priation but against the method of disposing of the 
products of the farm and horticultural departments. 
A second hearing was appointed at Amherst Town 
Hall, At this hearing the case of those opposed was 
opened by M. B. Kingman, M. A. C. '82, a florist of 
Amherst. Mr. Kingman stated plainly that the oppo- 
sition was not against the appropriation but against 
the methods at present used to dispose of the prod- 
ucts, and offered an amendment to the bill by which 
the sum or sums granted should be given condition- 
ally, the condition being that the trustees agree that 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"5 






the products of farm and Horticultural departments 
be disposed of in a wholesale market. Mr. Kingman 
contended that those products should only be sold in 
wholesale markets of large cities, that it was not fair 
when the state provided for the equipping and main- 
taining the college, and taxed the individual farmers to 
pay this.that this farmer should have to encounter and 
compete against the college products. He also con- 
tended that the work of the college should be wholly 
educational, and that the college should be content to 
sell its products at wholesale, after they had per- 
formed their purpose, namely the education of the 
students of the college ; also that the fact of the prod- 
ucts of the college being in the retail market in itself 
prevented private growers from getting a fair show.and 
cited facts to back up his statements. J. W. Clark. 
M. A. C. 72, was another speaker who told of the 
Injury done him by the college in open markets. Mr. 
Clark also contended that the products of the college 
should be sold in wholesale markets of cities as large 
or larger than Springfield. 

L. R. Smith, L. W. West and Henry West, all of 
Hadley, added to and confirmed the position of the 
first speakers. Charles A. Gleason and J. Lewis 
Ellsworth, both trustees of the college, affirmed that 
the trustees of the college would give the matter fair 
consideration at a special meeting of the trustees. 

A majority of the Legislature committee believed 
that the farmers had a decided grievance, but. as the 
trustees had promised to give a fair hearing, took no 
action in regard to the method of college sales. A 
bill Is before the Ways and Means committee favor- 
ing the granting of $58,000. 

The special meeting of the trustees was held as 
stated at the beginning of this article in the Town 
Hall, March 24. 

The following Is the account of the meeting printed 
in the Amherst Record : 

" Of the 14 members of the board of trustees 12 
were present at the hearing. Charles A. Gleason of 
New Braintree served as chairman of the meeting 
and J. Lewis Ellsworth of Worcester as secretary. 
It was expected that Lawyer Warner of Northampton 
would be there to present the case of the local produce 
dealers, but for some reason he was not in attendance. 
In his absence the principal arguments against the 
sale of college produce locally were presented by 



Morris B. Kingman, who spoke at considerable length 
and told how the college competition had been harm- 
ful in a variety of ways. His contention was that the 
college should dispose of its surplus produce In whole- 
sale markets far removed from Amherst. Other 
speakers whd endorsed Mr. Kingman's views in whole 
or In part were H. E. Smith and Mr. Pierce of 
Hadley, Mr. Clark of North Hadley, Mrs. Bolter of 
South Amherst, Mr. Sabin of East Amherst and W. 
J. Reilley of Amherst. John Mullen stated that only 
a very small percentage of the produce sold in the 
local markets was raised in this vicinity, much of it 
coming from Boston and Springfield. Acting Presi- 
dent Brooks and Professor F. A. Waugh of the horti- 
cultural department presented the college side of the 
matter in an able manner. When all had spoken who 
wished, the trustees declared the hearing closed. 

The trustees referred the matter to a subcommit- 
tee for future investigation. This committee has 
reported to the full board of trustees that It Is Inex- 
pedient to make any change in the present method of 
disposing of products. 

The report Is in part as follows : 
" To the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural college : 
Your committee to whom was referred the matter 
of the sales of the products of the farm and horticul- 
tural departments of the college, objections to which 
are made by some of the farmers, fruit growers and 
florists in the vicinity of Amherst, respectfully report: 
First. That the sales from the farm division are 
confined principally to milk, potatoes, celery and occa- 
sionally hay and pork. The milk is sold to the Burn- 
ham school, Northampton, the College dining hall and 
the Amherst creamery. The high quality, purity and 
cleanliness of the milk furnished the Burnham school 
is sufficiently recognized to command a price 35 per 
cent, higher than what was formerly paid to the milk 
producers in the vicinity. The other products are 
sold In the markets of Amherst, Northampton and 
Holyoke, which receive but a limited supply from the 
farmers in their vicinities. 

Second. That the sales from the horticultural 
division are from nursery stock, fruit and vegetables. 
cut flowers and flower and vegetable plants. The 
larger part of the nursery stock has been sold to nur- 
serymen In Springfield and Worcester, the remainder 




ia6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



to farmers and fruit growers In the Connecticut Valley. 
The total sales from this line amounted to $600 the 
past year. 

Third. Your committee was in attendance at the 
hearing given In the Amherst court on March 24, and 
noted the claims made by some of those in attend- 
ance, that an institution supported largely by the State 
should not be allowed to place its products upon the 
local markets in competition with the fruits and vege- 
tables grown by the farmers and gardeners in the vicin- 
ity. Your committee has also been met by many 
of the leading merchants, hotel and boarding-house 
managers, as well as citizens- at-large. These parties 
vigorously protest against any action on the part of 
the trustees that will deprive them of the privilege 
they have enjoyed for so many years, of being able to 
supply themselves with the superior quality of fruits 
and vegetables grown at the Agricultural college." 

What effect this will have upon the appropriation 
aked for." remains to be seen. The Springfield Union 
states the following : 

" Certain members of the Legislature who have 
been inclined to believe that the case of the farmers 
was a just one are anything but satisfied with the 
report. While they are not necessarily hostile to the 
college, they will naturally be opposed to granting 
money for greenhouse extensions, etc., unless the 
college agrees to stop competition with the farmers. 

This report is therefore likely to prevent any appro- 
priations for improvements at the college this year, 
for most of the farmers of the Legislature agree 
with the remonstrants against the college. It has 
been intimated, however, that the trustees might 
make some concession later, If by no other way they 
can get their appropriation through." 

Also the following article from the same source 
bears considerable relation to the question : 

" A junket of magnificent proportions and fine pos- 
sibilities is being planned by a number of legislators. 
This is a trip to Amherst, to take place some time in 
the latter part of April or the early part of May. 
The Senate and the House Ways and Means Commit- 
tee and the joint committees on Agriculture, Educa- 
tion and Military affairs have thus far bid for places 
on the junket, and the remaining small portion of the 
Legislature will want to go. 

The excuse is the bill to appropriate money for 



127 



additions at the State Agricultural College. Of 
course the Ways and means Committees would have 
to go to learn that money is really needed." 



Colleg? NotfS- 



— W. W. Colton, '06, and Jesse Curtis, '07, have 
left college, 

—Prof. C. S. Walker attended the Yale alumni 
banquet in Springfield on Saturday. April 8. 

— The first Band Concert given by our band will 
take place on the evening of Friday, the 28th Inst. 

— J. W. Gregg. '04, is employed as landscape 
gardener on Arbour Lodge, the former home of J. 
Sterling Morton. 

— At a recent meeting of the Signal board 
Tannat, '06, was elected a member to fill the position 
left vacant by Colton, ex-'06. 

— Hooker, who has been taking P. G. work on the 
Hill has accepted a position as an assistant entomolo- 
gist with the United States government. 

— The Horticultural Department has recently 
received two shipments of dwarf trees from Ger- 
many to be used in the experimental planting. 

— P. F.Williams, '05, exercised his "professional 
mind " during vacation by taking a contract for 
pruning shrubs and fixing up grounds in Concord. 

—P. F. Staples. '04, has given up his P. G. work 
In order to accept the position of Professor of Horti- 
culture at the Baron de Hirsh school in Woodbine, 
N.j. 

— The track committee of the freshmen class 
have started their work by erecting the standards 
for high jump and pole-vault and prepared a place 
for the broad jump. 

— M. A. Blake, '04, assistant professor of horticul- 
ture at the Rhode Island State College, has been 
very successful in his profession and has been pro- 
mised something better for next year. 

— F. L. Austin. '08, has left college to accept a 
position as dairyman at " Brooklawn Farm " Morris 
Plains, N. J. Mr. D. H. McAlpine, the millionaire 
tobacco man and owner of the estate, appreciates 
M. A. C men. His superintendent Is L. J. Shepard. 
'96. 



— Wm. R. Sessions, vice-president of the board of 
trustees has returned from a trip to the West. He 
was in Hot Springs. Ark. when that city was swept by 
fire and narrowly escaped with his belongings. 

—The senior class has voted to dispense with the 
six commencement day speakers if the faculty and 
trustees consent, and In their place have the time 
filled with an address by some prominent speaker. 

—The pulpit of Rev. J. F. Gleason at South 
Amherst has been filled by Prof. C. S. Walker the 
past three weeks. Mr. Gleason has been unable to 
attend to his ministerial duties on account of sickness. 

— Sumner C. Brooks, son of our acting president, 
has lately distinguished himself as a debater. The 
Amherst High School team, of which he is a member, 
won their annual debate with Northampton on April 
seventh. 

— The chestnut trees on Mt. Pleasant owned by 
the college are being sawed for timber. The state 
forester visited the college a few weeks ago and 
decided that these trees had outgrown their use- 
fulness. 100,000 ft, have been sawed. 

— The baseball manager has secured a game with 
the Holyoke team of the Connecticut League, to be 
played at Holyoke. Monday, April 24. Manager 
Taft has taken on this hard game with the expectation 
that the undergraduates will attend in a body and 
support the team. 

— •« Fruit Marketing " by Prof. F. A. Waugh has 
just been published by the Western Fruit Grower's 
Asssoclatlon. Massachusetts is contributing her full 
share to the agricultural literature of the country, 
for a month seldom goes by without some work 
from the pen of one of her sons. 

— The prospects for a track team here are becom 
Ing more favorable. Acting Pres. Brooks, Profs. 
Mills and and Dr. Lull are heartily In favor of it and 
are doing their utmost In its behalf. The committee 
of the trustees, on buildings and grounds will soon 
come to Amherst In order to Investigate closely the 
need of a track. 

—The first practice game of the baseball season 
with the Amherst high school last Thursday, resulted 
in a score of M. A, C. 6 to A. H. S. 4, in five Innings. 
Amherst secured her four counts in the first inning, 
after which only two men saw first base. Our runs 



were scored by timely hitting in the last three innings. 
The chilly air and the early season partly account for 
the unsteadyness of some of the new men. 

— Fifteen men of Dartmouth College were inducted 
as the Tau Chapter, Phi Sigma Kappa at Hanover. 
March 25th by Pres. George J. Vogel, Cornell, '91. 
and Inductor Frank G. Curtis. Cornell, '03, assisted 
by W. V. Tower. W. W. Colton, F. C. Pray, E. G. 
Bartlett, C. H. Chadwick. W. F. Dickinson and E. 
D. Philbrlck of M. A. C. A. A. Rice. ex. '07, 
was one of the charter members. After the Induc- 
tion a banquet was served at the Hanover Inn. 



JUNIOR CLASS BANQUET. 

The junior class banquet was held at Whately. 
Friday night. March 24. Nearly the whole class was 
present as also were a few of the former members 
of the class. Several of the men went to the theatre 
In Holyoke before going to Whately. These men 
were arrayed in divers costumes displaying all the 
latest styles in hats. Another portion of the class 
held a theatre party In Northampton. The ban- 
quet proper began at midnight. Mr. W. C. Tannatt, 
as toastmaster called upon the following men to 
respond to toasts ; Frank H. Kennedy. A. H. M. 
Wood. Richard Wellington. Daniel H. Carey, 
Francis D. Wholley, Ralph W. Peakes, H. M. Rus- 
sell and William O. Taft. G, T. French, A. D Farrar 
and Archie Hartford also responded to toasts. The 
banquet committee consisted of Harry M. Russell 
Addison T. Hastings and William O. Taft, An 
encouraging feature of the banquet was the marked 
prevalence of genuine fraternal ferling among the men. 



THE COLLEGE CATALOGUE. 

The new catalogue for 1904- 1905 was published 
early in March. In appearance It is much like its 
Immediate predecessors but several Improvements 
have been made. The usual description of the origin, 
object and location of the college appears In the first 
part of the book together with the list of the trustees, 
board of overseers and the faculty. The address of 
each member of the faculty is given In this Issue of 
the catalogue. 

After stating the requirements for admission, in 
which there has been no recent change, a careful 









128 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



description of the course of Instruction In each subject 
is given. These are all recapitulated In a general 
synopsis of subjects for each year. An account of 
the graduate work and the short courses in dairying 
and bee-culture follow this. The equipment of the 
several departments is taken up in some detail and 
the various buildings belonging to the college are 
described. 

Under the head " General Information " are remarks 
in regard to the dormitories, expenses, scholarships, 
degrees, etc. The estimated expenses have been 
raised this year and are now more nearly correct. A 
list of the student body and of the alumni associations 
occurs at the end of the book. Owing to the fact 
that there are two short course classes on the list of 
students and that several students have since left 
college, the total number according to the catalogue 
(267) is considerably in excess of the present number 
in college. 

The catalogue is printed neatly and does the college 
full justice. If we have any suggestion or criticism to 
make, it is that a view of some of the college build- 
ings or a simple plan of the college grounds would 
enhance the value of the book. Such additions would 
greatly interest prospective students and give to them 
a more extensive idea as to the situation of the college 
than can be obtained from a cursory reading of the 
catalogue. 

THEATER ATTRACTIONS. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

April 19, The Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

24, " Superba." 

25, " The Isle of Spice." 

EMPIRE THEATRE. 

April 19, " On the Yellowstone." 

20-21-22, Rice and Barton Gaiety Company. 
24-25-26, " A Wife's Mistake." 
27-28-29. " Vanity Fair." 

INFORMAL DANCE. 

The fourth Informal dance of the college year will 
be held In the drill hall on Saturday afternoon and 
evening, April, 29. A large attendance is anticipated 
owing to the long pause In this phase of social life 
here during Lent ; and it Is hoped that this one. and 
one more in May will add greatly to the most success- 



ful series of informal dances ever held at the college. 
The orders will be filled out at seven o'clock In the 
chapel reading room on Friday evening. April 28. 
This is done in order that It may be satisfactory 
to all, and that those arriving late at the dance be not 
disappointed in their dances. Dancing will begin at 
4-30 and music will consist of Warner's orchestra of 
five pieces. 

A NEW ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

AS YET WITHOUT A NAME. 

About 30 graduates of the college met in the Am- 
herst House parlors on the evening of April 12th and 
organized an alumni association, adopted a constitu- 
tion and elected officers. 

The organization is intended to be primarily a local 
association, having for its members the alumni resid- 
ing in Amherst and vicinity and it is hoped that all 
graduates of the college in the surrounding towns 
including Northampton and Holyoke^will join. 

The meeting was called for April 12 by a commit- 
tee of three, appointed by a meeting of local 
alumni a month previous, to consider the advisability 
of organizing. The committee consisted of David 
Barry, chairman, and E. B. Holland and A. C. Mon- 
ahan. The committee reviewed the ground carefully 
and decided that such an organization was very desir- 
able. They found that in Amherst and Sunderland 
there are at present 40 graduates of the college, one at 
least dating back to the class of 71 ; and in Hadley, 
Northampton and Hatfield there are at least 15 more. 
Notice of the meeting was sent only to those in Am- 
herst and Sunderland and a general Invitation was 
extended to others through the papers. An unfortun- 
ate accident happened to the article given to the 
Springfield Republican. In going through the press 
the type became mixed and the article which appeared 
limited the Invitation to alumni of Amherst and Sun- 
derland much against the Intention of the committee. 
As the article was copied by Northampton papers, 
Northampton graduates probably thought they were 
not wanted and but one appeared at the meeting. 
For the next meeting more general notices will be 
seut out. In the mean time an invitation is extended 
to all to join, which they may do by sending their 
name and an initiation fee of 50 cents to the secre- 
tary. The constitution adopted provides " that any 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



129 



alumnus may become a member upon the payment 
of an initiation fee of 50 cents " and also •• that there 
shall be no regular dues." 

The purpose of the association is a little broader 
than that of the other alumni club : it will not only 
promote good fellowship among the members but it 
will also keep the entire alumni body in closer touch 
with the organization and work of the college and 
experiment station. As the members are living close 
to the centre of organization frequent meetings may 
be held for social purposes or to discuss points of 
interest that may arise. The constitution provides 
for an annual meeting to be held In March and gives 
the executive board power to call meetings at any 
other time they may deem it advisable. 

The meeting was called to order at 7-30 and David 
Barry, '90. was chosen chairman and W. E. Totting- 
ham, '03, secretary. It was voted unanimously to 
organize an association. An outline constitution was 
discussed and adopted and was placed in the hands of 
a committee for further additions or revlsal. No 
name was adopted although several were considered 
among which was » The Local Association of M.A.C. 
Alumni," "The Home Association of M. A. C. 
Alumni." h The M. A. C. Alumni Association of 
Amherst and Vicinity " and '• The Levi Stockbridge 
Alumni Association of the M. A. C." The matter 
was laid on the table for future consideration. All 
members of the alumni present joined the association 
and the following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: President, C. Fred Deuel, 76. of Amherst; 
1st vice-president, Dr. H. T. Shores. '91, of North- 
ampton; 2d vice-president. Cyrus M. Hubbard, '92, 
of Sunderland ; 3d vice-president, Henry J. Field, 
'01 of Greenfield ; secretary, A. C. Monahan. '00. of 
Amherst ; treasurer, E. B. Holland. '92, of Amherst ; 
auditor, G. P. Smith. 79, of Sunderland. These 
officers constitute the executive board. It was voted 
to notify President Goodell of the organization of the 
association and to extend to him a sincere vote of sym- 
pathy in his sickness. It was voted also that Professor 
Cooley be a committee of one to negotiate a baseball 
game to be played between an alumni team and the 
senior class on Tuesday of Commencement week 
and if successful in its negotiation the committee is 
given full power to organize and manage the aluiunl 
team. Among the older alumni present were : 



H. L. Cowles. 71 ; C. S. Wellington. 73 ; W. P. 
Brooks. 75, C. F. Deuel, 76; J. K. Mills, 77 ; G. 
P. Smith, 79; M. B. Kingman, '82; J. B. Paige. 
'82 ; C. W. Clapp. '86 ; F. S. Cooley, E. H. Dick- 
inson. '88 ; David Barry, Henri Haskins, A. C. Mc- 
Cloud. '90 ; E. B. Holland, C. M. Hubbard. M. H. 
Williams. '92 ; S. F. Howard, '94 ; P. H. Smith, '97 
and C. G. Clark. '98. 



Department* |Mot?s. 



BOTANICAL. 
On Friday, March 17. Dr. Stone conducted the 
Junior class in Plant Pathology on a tour among 
some of the most noted greenhouses in the eastern 
part of the state. The object of the trip was not to study 
the diseases of the various crops under glasss but to 
see them in a perfect state of health and to study the 
conditions under which the best growers prevent 
disease. Those who went felt repaid many times 
over not only for the enjoyment of the occasion but 
more especially for the educational features and the 
inspiration which can only be derived by seeing what 
a complete success these eminent growers have made 
and by talking with the men. 

The party started on an early train which they left 
at Wayland. From here they drove by carriage to 
the Waban Conservatories where a specialty is made 
of roses. Here were seen the finest and largest col- 
lection of the flowers to be seen anywhere, beautiful 
specimens of such choice varieties as the American 
Beauty. Liberty, and the new Wellesley. These 
conservatories are owned by one of our alumni, Mr. 
Montgomery, class of '98. The party drove from 
here to Natick and took the train Into Boston where 
they took dinner. In the afternoon a car was boarded 
for Arlington where Rawson's and Weyman's acres 
of crops under glass were inspected. Fine crops of 
cucumbers and lettuce were growing here, almost 
free from disease. In the evening diversion was 
sought in the city at Keith's theatre. Saturday 
morning they visited Mr. Simms, one of the most 
successful violet growers to be found. His talk with 
Dr. Stone and the students revealed the gigantic 
possibilities of violet growing, especially In connec- 
tion with summer market gardening for the Boston 
trade. At noon the partj broke up. many going to 












X30 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



their home. The fact seemed to be impressed on 
all that gardening under glass is a most profitable 
and enjoyable business for those who have a taste In 
that line. 

BIOLOGY. 

A new and valuable addition has recently been 
made to the Zoological museum which will be of 
particular interest to those who are interested in 
biology. It is a plaster cast of a skull discovered not 
long ago on the island of Java, imbedded In rock of 
the Pleistocene age. This skull has been called the 
" missing link " in the line connecting man with the 
higher apes and is a most important discovery. 

Dr. Lull, professor of Zoology, has just been 
appointed by the United States Geological Survey to 
edit and complete a large monograph on the 
Ceratopsla. or horned dinosaurs. This is an extinct 
order of large reptiles living in the Mesozoic age. 
The book was begun by Professor Marsh of Yale 
who was the foremost paleontologist of his time. 
Upon the death of Professor Marsh the work was 
taken up by Mr. J. B. Hatcher who spent much 
time and hard work searching for fossil remains in the 
West, and in fact gave up his life as a result so that 
the work was still left unfinished at his death. July 4, 
1904. Some of the chapters are lost and hence 
much responsibility and original work is needed. Dr. 
Lull, from his former excursion to the West seems 
to be just the right man for the place. 

AGRICULTURE. 
On April 7. the members of the agricultural semi- 
nar were entertained by a paper on " Duck Raising,' 
by Scott, '06. This seminar, It might be added by 
way of explanation is an agricultural club which was 
organized during the winter for the purpose of discuss- 
ing topics of interest to the members. They take 
turns In studying up a subject in our library, which is 
one of the best In the country along these lines, and 
report at some meeting. They not only thus benefit 
themselves but give to the others the results of this 
Individual research. The officers are Scott. '06, 
president ; Wellington, '06, vice-president, and Mose- 
ley, *06. secretary. 



131 



Al 



umm, 



An intercollegiate gymnastic contest was held at 
Princeton on March 31. Ten colleges were repre- 
sented, among them Yale, Harvard and Princeton. 



As an experiment the present number of the Sic- 
mal Is being sent to every alumnus of the college 
whose address is known, whether a subscriber or not. 
The purpose of this is to awaken more interest among 
the alumni and to enlarge our subscription list. If 
you are not now on our lists, it is sincerely hoped 
that you will subscribe, whether you have been away 
from college one or two years, or thirty years. In 
the future it is hoped to make this paper more of a 
newspaper of the college, containing all the news of. 
what is going on here, all questions arising around col- 
lege, and everything that can be procured concerning 
alumni. Outside of mere money matters, it is our 
purpose to bring the alumni closer to the college itself 
No college, perhaps, is in greater need of the loyal 
aid and support of every friend than is Massachusetts : 
and a friendly word of advice and encouragement 
from an alumnus goes a long way. Communications 
from alumni concerning the paper or the college stat- 
ing their own feelings or criticism about any matter 
will receive due consideration, and if of general Inter- 
est will be published in the Signal. It is the wish of 
the board to make this paper just what the alumni 
and undergraduates would most desire It. 

The class of 75 will hold their reunion in June, 
celebrating their 30th anniversary. On their I Oth 
fifteen out of eighteen living were present ; on their 
20th, twelve ; and now on their 30th it is resolved to 
have all the class present, thus setting a good example 
to other classes. 

'81.— Word has been received that Boonzo 
Hashlguchl, governor of F ormosa. and a man of great 
prominence In his native land, died just before the 
outbreak of the war a year ago. 

'85.— E. W. Allen, Vice-Director of the Office of 
Experiment Stations. Washington, D. C. Is starting 
out on an extensive tour of Inspection of the experi- 
ment stations of the South. 

'87. — F. H. Fowler was unanimously elected audi- 
tor of the town of Wayland for the ensuing year at 
their annual town meeting March 27th. 

'87. — Thomas F. B. Meehan, a rising young lawyer 
of Jamaica Plain, died April 4th of pneumonia. 
This is the first death to occur In the class of '87. 



'94.— E. H. Alderman. Chester, Mass. 

•99.— William Hooker left April 12 for Florida 
under the direction of the Bureau of Entomology of 
the United State Department of Agriculture for work 
on the tobacco thrip. 

"00.— E. K. Atkins, the very much alive secretary 
of this class, sends in a full list of addresses of his 
classmates. We cannot help wishing that each 
class secretary would do the same. 

'00— Howard Baker. V. M. D. Inspector, Division 
of Meat Inspection, stationed at South Omaha. Neb. 
has since October 1 been in charge of the Micro- 
scopic Department. Address. 1016 N 22 St., South 
Omaha, Neb. 

'00.— H. L. Crane, Ellis, Mass. 

'00. — J. E. Halllgan, who recently made a trip to 
Cuba, has returned to the Sugar Experiment Station, 
Audubon Park. New Orleans. 

'00.— A. A. Harmon, V. M. D., In the Pathologi- 
cal Laboratory of the Bureau of Animal Industry. 
Address. 1716 W St„ N. W., Washington. D. C. 

'00.— E. T. Hull, M. D., on house staff of Hud- 
son St. Hospital. New York City. Address 67 
Hudson St. 

'00.— M. B. Landers. M. D.. is practising in 
Ludlow. 

'00.— A. W. Morrill. Special Field Agent, Bureau 
of Entomology, U. S. Department of Agriculture.con- 
nected with Cotton Boll-Weevil investigation, head- 
quarters for 1905, Dallas, Tex. Address box 208. 

'00.— F. G. Stanley, M. D., is located In Essex. 
Address 38 Main St. 

^ '02.— Married. March 22. John C. Hall and Elsa 
Ellens in South Sudbury. Mr. Hall Is engaged exten- 
sively in farming and poultry in Sudbury. 

02.— Married, March 31, at New Paltz, N. J. 
C. I. Lewis and Marie Antoinette Berry. Mr. Lewis 
is professor of Natural History and Agriculture In 
Alfred University. 

'02.— R. W. Morse has been visiting in Amherst 
recently. 

'04. — F. F. Henshaw employed by the Brown 
Hoisting Machine Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 

'04.— A. L. Peck Is employed in the office of Mr. 
Frederick G. Todd, landscape gardener. Montreal and 
finds the work congenial. 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fashion " 
ami plenty of assortment .-. .-. 

THAT'S US. 

Haynes & Co., 



Sprinofikld, 



Altvays Reliable. 



Mam 



UP«TO«D A.T BJ 

Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 
Amhkrst, Mass. 



E. D. PniLBRicx, '07. 



Edwards, *08. 



A Fall Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 






132 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






'04.— P. F. Staples left April 12 for Woodbine, 
N. J., where he has received the position of Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture in the Baron de Hirsch school. 



lnt?rcoll{gi&-te. 



The candidates for the Freshman crew at Cornell 
number 108. 

Michigan University registers more students this 
year than Harvard. 

Carlisle is to have a new hospital so that the Indian 
girls may be trained as nurses. 

Yale paid $100 this year for casualty insurance at 
the Yale-Harvard football game. 

Andrew Carnegie has given $150,000 for a library 
building for Syracuse University. 

The United States government wants 140 college 
graduates for positions in the Philippines. 

It is claimed that the California University's ex- 
auditor has embezzled $55,000 of the school's money. 

The managing editor of College Topics, the Univer- 
sity of Virginia paper, receives a salary of $200 a 
year. 

Stanford University received by the will of the late 
Mrs. Stanford, her residence which is valued at 
$2,300, 000. 

At Rutgers 1 1 1 of the 220 men in the college are 
in Bible study this year. Four of the classes are held 
in fraternities. 

Cornell is to have a cricket team this year. There 
is also a cricket club at the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute has recently lost by 
fire one of its finest buildings, the Science Hall. The 
loss is estimated at about $100,000. 

Harvard University has just been bequeathed 
$1,000,000 by Wm. F. Milton of Pittsfield and New 
York, and $200,000 by James C. Carter of New 
York. 

The University of Chicago will have a strong track 
team this year if the present indications are to be 
believed. Two world's records in the 50-yard dash 
and the 50-yard hurdles have been equalled, while a 
new pole vault record for the gymnasium has been 
established. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 



The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Gayer Hats and A. B. Kirsch- 

baum & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN ind H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON A THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Belie jjjj Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 







High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 







l VVr^/VrV^r^^ 



(Supplement to The College Signal) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 3, 1905. 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student, and I Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collboe S.onal. Amherst Mass Thi Signal will be 

*S?w2SS£. ita di ~ M,tinu * nce * 8rdered and ™ n " e m Subscriber> wbo * ** ~- = *£^~££ «o 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS. JR.. 1906. Editor-In Chief. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES. 1 906, Business Manager. 

EDWIN DANIELS PH1LBRICK, 1 907. Assistant Business Manaeer 
CHARLES WALTER CARPENTER. 1906. Department Notes. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT ion*, i-.—^i.-. . 

W.LLARD COLBURN TANNATT. JR.. 1 906. College Notes. ARTHUR WILUAM mYc.NS l*^ *?m- 

EARLE COODMAN BARTLETT. 1907. Athletics. CLINTON KINc" ^907 ' "*"' 

HERBERT LINWOOD WHITE. 1908. MARCUS METCALF BROWNE. 1908. 



Tortus, ft.00 per gear in .done.. Single Copi.e, toe. PoeUg. oatoido .« U nited Stat- end Canada, «»«. axtr ,. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRXCT0RY. 



L. H. Moseley, Pres. 
R. W. Peakes, Manager. 
W. A. Munson, Pres. 
J. E. Martin, Sec. 
Basket-ball Association, A. 



Athletic Association, 

Base- Ball Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Seven Index. 

Fraternity Conference, 

Hastings, Manager. 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 

W. O. Taft, Manager. 

M. H.Clark. Manager. 

C. W. Patch, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



LAST TRIBUTE PAID TO PRESIDENT 

G00DELL. 

The funeral of our late president was held In the 
College Chapel on April 27 at 3 o'clock. The pulpit 
was banked with palms and potted plants and the 
casket surrounded with many beautiful floral tributes 
from his many friends and from the many organiza- 
tions to which he was connected. The Chapel was 
filled to overflowing by the many who came to show 
their regard and respect for President Goodell. The 
entire student body, the entire body of trustees and 
the faculty were present. There was a large delega- 
tion from the alumni and from Amherst college and 
the Psi Upsilon fraternity present. R. W. Stratton 
and G. S. Kendrick represented the vestry of Grace 
church, of which President Goodell had been a mem- 
ber for 25 years, A delegation from the E. M. Stan- 
ton post G. A. R. occupied the body of the house. 
Major McManus, an officer in the 23d Conn. Regt., 
U. S. V. of which President Goodell was 1st Lieut- 



enant came from Hartford. The Chinese ambassa- 
dor, Sir Chenrung Liang Cheng, came on from Wash- 
ington to pay tribute to the personal friend of his 
boyhood. 

A detail from the battalion of cadets escorted the 
body from the house to the Chapel. The services 
began with the singing of •• Nearer, My God to Thee." 
by a male quartet from the college choir. Rev. Cal- 
vin Stebblns of Framlngham, a classmate of Presi- 
dent Goodell's after offering the invocation, read selec- 
tions from the Scriptures and two poems that had 
been selected by President Goodell for the funeral 
services of a classmate. Rev. C. S. Walker, chap- 
lain of the college offered prayer. Rev. Mr. Steb- 
blns delivered a beautiful and Impressive eulogy 
speaking briefly of the life and work of his friend. A 
few of his words were as follows : 

" My friends, such floods of recollections come 
pouring Into my mind as I stand here before you that 
it would be utterly impossible to express them all and 
so let me content myself with a few brief things which 
may be of some consolation. 1 suppose that had our 












*34 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







dear friend been asked concerning his funeral, a natu- 
ral trend of his mind and heart would have said with 
great emphasis, it must be in my own home with my 
friends about me, that Is, my family and a few words 
of encouragement, a few words of gold coined out of 
the thoughts of the great heroes, from the hearts of 
the great heroes of the past, will serve to console my 
friends, and a prayer thanking God for this world and 
thanking God for the joy of light, its friendship, its 
great encouragement, and a prayer for the strength- 
ening of the light of quiet love which has been 
gained from those I love. And It Is a great blessing 
that we have been given this joy of work and opportunity 
to tell you this one thing. My friend, you 
and I are not elected again to see a more lovable 
man. We are not elected in our short experience to 
shake many men by the hands whom we were so sure 
of every time. Here is a brief incident. On the 
15th of June, 1863 he wrote his name on a paper 
that he would go on a forlorn hope and dangerous 
piece of business. Everyone who signed that paper 
knew that It might be his last encounter. I often 
wonder what he thought and how he felt when he 
went back to his tent to write his will, to give this 
book to this one, this keepsake to that one, and that 
book to that friend. I tell you those were great days 
and it is in my heart to say that genuine faith, trust 
and courage lived In those days, but what are words 
to those whose faith and truth on war's stone rang 
true metal. He followed a flag that had not a thread 
of cotton in it but that represented a single idea fore- 
most in the world. He followed it as others before 
him had done, But after this the victory for the 
civic virtues comes to the front, and I happen to be 
one of those who believe that the civic virtues are the 
-eatest because they blend with the teachings of the 
Golden Rule. As for his connection with these you 
know the story too well for me to repeat anything 
about it. but let me remind you of one thing. Here 
is a man who believe in the utility of books and that 
a book furnished the best representation of the utility 
of the world. A book would serve one man or a 
thousand men and so he gave his first thought to a 
library in this Institution and his time and best thought 
to a library in this lown. But I don't know that I 
can dwell upon it. The world seems uncertain, things 
come and go, but here is a man who stood out in the 



midst of it. You could depend upon him. He was 
there. Did you stand on the mountain tops of joy his 
kindly voice was the first to greet you were you in the 
valley, it was his hand which was the first to reach 
you. He was one of those men who see the good 
side of all of us. I therefore know I can in no way 
better close this than with the words which Whlttier 
has said of his friend when he says : 

' He has done the work of a true man, — 

Crown him. honor him, love him. 
Weep over him, tears of woman. 

Stoop manliest brows above him ! 

O dusky mothers and daughters, 

Vigils of mourning keep for him I 
Up in the mountains, and down by the waters, 

Lift up your voices, and weep for him ! 

For the warmest of hearts is frozen, 

The freest of hands is still ; 
And the gap in our picked and chosen 

The long years may not fill. 

No duty could overtask him. 

No need his will outrun ; 
Or ever our lips could ask him, 

His hands the work had done. 

He forgot his own soul for others. 

Himself to his neighbor lending ; 
He found the Lord in his suffering brothers, 

And not in the clouds descending. 

So the bed was sweet to die on. 
Whence he saw the doors wide swung 

Against whose bolted iron 
The strength of his life was flung. 

And he saw ere his eye was darkened 

The sheaves of the harvest bringing, 
And knew while his ears yet hearkened 

The voice of the reapers singing. 

Ah. well I The world is discreet ; 

There are plenty to pause and wait ; 
But there was a man who set his feet 

Sometimes in advance of fate ; 

Plucked off the old bark when the inner 

Was slow to renew it, 
And put to the Lord's work the sinner 

When saints failed to do it. 



i35 



Never rode to the wrong's redressing 

A worthier paladin. 
Shall he not hear the blessing. 

" Good and faithful, enter in I " ' 

My friends let us not be selfish while we are weep- 
ing. There are others who are not weeping. There 
are the father, the mother, the seven brothers and 
sisters, classmates and friends who now greet his 
arrival with shouts of joy. Let us thank God for 
what we have had." 

The services closed with a prayer by Rev. Mr. 
Stebbins which ended with an expression of the joy 
opening for President Goodell in the life beyond, where 
have gone his seven brothers, his mother and father 
and many classmates. A closing hymn, "Abide 
With Me," was sung by the quartet. Rev. C. S. 
Walker offered the benediction. 

The procession to the cemetery was led by the 
college band and battalion in uniform with draped 
colors and muffled drum. The E. M. Stanton post 
G. A. R. and the faculty also acting as escorts. The 
honorary bearers were Trustee W. R. Sessions of 
Springfield, Trustee M. F. Dickinson of Boston, Col. 
Mason W. Tyler of Plainfield, N. J., Dr. Luther D. 
Shepard of Boston. Prof. B. K. Emerson of Amherst 
College and Prof. George F. Mills of the Agricultural 
College. The active bearers were all from the col 
lege faculty and were Dr. R. S. Lull, Prof. F. S. 
Cooley. Dr. J. B. Paige, Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck. Prof. 
J. E. Ostrander, and Dr. Charles Wellington. Dur- 
ing the funeral procession the bells at Amherst Col- 
lege and at the Agricultural College tolled. The 
burial was private at the family lot at West Cemetery, 
Rev. Mr. Stebbins officiating. 

The battalion of cadets returned to the college and 
drew up on the campus while " Taps " was played on 
the bugle underneath the flag staff. As a mark of 
respect Amherst College closed during the afternoon, 
the Agricultural College for the entire day and business 
throughout the town ceased during the hours of 
services. 



Agricultural College, do hereby extend our deepest sympa- 
thies to his bereaved family. Surely he, who has made 
himself dear to us by his conscientiousness and earnest 
desires for our welfare and whose life should be an inspira- 
tion for us all, must be doubly dear to those with whom he 
was more closely associated and who at this time are 
mourning the loss of a beloved husband and loving father. 

G. W. Patch. 
B. Tupper, 

E. W. Newhall, Jr., 

F. H. Kennedy, 
F. C. Peters. 
T. A. Barry. 



For the 
Student Body. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

HENRY HILL COODELL. PRESIDENT OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE. 

Realizing the weight of our own afflictions in the loss of 

our beloved president, we. the students of the Massachusetts 



OUR LATE PRESIDENT. 

Henry Hill Goodell, president of our college since 
1986, for nearly forty years a leading citizen of 
Amherst, known among the leaders of education and 
among the rulers of our government, respected, 
esteemed, and beloved by all who knew him, passed 
away on Sunday, April 23, on the steamship 
Nacoochee of the Savannah line, on his way from 
Savannah to Boston. The past few years of his life 
has been a constant hopeless struggle against disease, 
a struggle known only to his physicians and himself 
for his most personal friends were deceived by his 
sunny disposition, and his indomitable will, which sus- 
tained him In public life and gave him the appearance 
of enjoying perfect physical and mental health. 
" Disease might rack his body but his spirit was of 
the kind that has sent martyrs to the dungeon and the 
stake. For he was, in a large sense, a martyr to his 
work. He insisted even in later years, In undertaking 
a variety of work which would severely tax the powers 
of a man in the prime of life and of the most robust 
physique. He refused to spare himself what others 
would have spared him, and insisted on the strict per- 
formance of every duty without considering the effect 
upon himself," says the Amherst Record. The con- 
tinuance of his work under such adversities exhausted 
his vitality and under the absolute command of his 
physicians he spent most of the winter of 1903-4 In 
the south, returning last spring much Improved. But 
the immediate assumption of duties and his conse- 
quent characteristic activities in behalf of the college 
caused a serious and fatal Illness. Soon after college 
opened in the fall the college trustees voted him a 
leave of absence for six months and as soon as his 
condition permitted he was taken to the South where 






i36 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



137 



he remained several weeks but owing to no decided 
improvement he set sail from St. Augustine to Bos- 
ton and on the journey passed into the other world. 

President Goodell was the son of William and Abi- 
gail Perkins (Davis) Goodell and was born in Con- 
stantinople, Turkey, while his father was acting as a 
missionary there. He came to the United States 
when a young man and fitted for college at Williston 
Seminary, entering Amherst college with the class of 
•62, joining the Psi Upsilon fraternity. For many 
years he was secretary of his class and was always 
one of the most popular and beloved members, always 
striving for the best Interests of his class and college. 
During his after life he remained a firm and loyal son 
of his alma mater. Amherst college conferred upon 
him in 1891 the degree of Doctor of Laws. Soon 
after graduating the Civil War broke out and he 
enlisted In the 25th Connecticut volunteer Infantry. 
On Aug. 16, 1862, he was commissioned at Hartford, 
Conn., as 2nd Lieutenant of Co. F, 25th regiment, 
and was promoted on April 14, 1863 as 1st Lieuten- 
ant. On July 8, 1862, he was appointed aid-de- 
camp on the staff of General Bissell of the 3d brigade. 
4th division of the 19th army corps. During the war 
he served at Irish Bend, Vermillion, siege of Port 
Hudson, and In the Teche campaign. He was mus- 
tered out of service at Hartford, Conn., Aug. 26, 

1863. 

On retiring from the army he received an appoint- 
ment as teacher of modern languages at Williston 
Seminary, remaining there until 1867, when he was 
called to Amherst to take the professorship of modern 
languages and English literature at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, which position he filled for the 
rest of his eventful career. On the death of Pres. 
Paul A. Chadbourne in January, 1883, Professor 
Goodell was chosen acting-president, and served in 
this capacity until James C. Greenough was made 
president. In 1886. after President Greenough 
resigned, the vacancy was filled by the election of 
Professor Goodell as president. 

President Goodell was married Dec. 10, 1873, to 
Helen Eloise, daughter of John Stanton of New 
Orleans, La., who survives him, with their two chil- 
dren. John S. Goodell, engaged in railroad business 
at Galveston. Texas, and William Goodell, a student 
at the Harvard Medical school. Sometime during 



the 70's President Goodell built the house on Sunset 
Avenue in which he continued to reside up to his 

death. 

President Goodell's life-work was the upbuilding 
and the development of the Agricultural College, All 
his exceptional and wonderful abilities, his entire 
energy and vitality were given in its behalf. To what 
extent the college is indebted to him Is beyond con- 
ception, so great has been the results of his work. 
None will ever know how much good he has done. 
When he assumed his duties the college was in an 
experimental stage. " Not only did he have to con- 
tend with the ordinary vicissitudes of a newly estab- 
lished educational institution." but with a thousand of 
other difficulties. The college was lacking In finances 
and in buildings, it was viewed with disfavor by the 
agricultural men of the country in whose interests it 
was founded, and the general courts at Boston and at 
Washington looked upon the college with suspicion. 
Nothing daunted by all these unfavourable circum- 
stances, President Goodell with his characteristic 
energy and tact set himself to remedy these con- 
ditions. With his wonderful powers of oratory and 
eloquence he persuaded successive Legislatures to 
grant sums of money, proving to them that the college 
was the ward of the state and It was their duty to the 
state to see that the college prospered. If we con- 
sider the erroneous opinion held at that time in 
respect to agricultural colleges his achievement in 
obtaining money will be more fully appreciated. H e 
asked outright for appropriations for buildings, equip- 
ments and expenses, not as a favor but as a right, and 
he was never refused. His wide acquaintance and 
friendship among leading public men, both In Boston 
and in Washington, was a great help to the college. 
He also took efficient measures to show to the public 
at large and especially to the farmers and those 
engaged in allied industries, for what the college was 
Intended and for what It would do in educating at a 
low expense the poorer boys of the state, Impressing 
upon them the value of an agricultural education. 
Not only did he build up the college proper but he 
first started the experiment station, being its first 
director, a position which he ably filled up to his 
death. To what a grand extent this work has gone 
on under his management is readily seen. The 
experiment station work now Is the one thing that 



advances the science of agriculture. For all the help 
the farmers of the state derive from this source, they 
can only thank him, it is impossible to measure it and 
give adequate compensation for the results are too 
large. As a result of his untiring, unselfish, and 
conscientious efforts the college has grown from a 
mere nucleus to its present proportion. Every year 
brings more students and the faculty has grown from 
ten members to twenty-five. All future development 
and growth will be further results from his labor and 
from his judicious, patient and persistent advertising. 
President Goodell was an able teacher as well as 
a successful executive. Acting- President Brooks. 



who was a pupil under him for four years, says that 
he was a remarkable teacher, always having full con- 
trol of his classes, and always causing them to get 
much from the subject which he taught. His suc- 
cess as a scholar is shown by the fact that he served 
as well as being instructor of modern languages, the 
duties of instructor in gymnastics, military tactics, 
rhetoric and elocution, anatomy and physiology, 
zoology and history, all equally well. In addition to 
all this he took an active interest in library work and 
up to very recent years served as librarian at the col- 
lege. He built up the library from a very few books 
in a single room in North College to its present con- 
ditions, so that now the 26.000 volumes, rich In sci- 
entific and technical researches, have filled the pres- 
ent library to overflowing. He was also a writer him- 
self of no mean ability. He wrote the biographical 
record of his class at Amherst college ; he published 
a compilation of historical fiction, and besides these 
two has written many other articles. 

While President Goodell devoted his best efforts 
to the service of the college he found abundant time 
and opportunity to perform the duties of a good and 
loyal citizen. He loved Amherst, he made himself 
acquainted with its history, he valued the friendships 
which he made among its people. For years he 
worked for the Amherst public library, serving on the 
book committee and with his own hands making the 
first card catalog. He was a faithful member of the 
vestry of Grace church and for twenty-five years was 
its clerk. He was also an enthusiastic member of 
the E. M. Stanton post, G. A. R.. and was a member 
of the Loyal Legion, in addition, serving as com- 
mander of the post for several years and up to his 



death was a member of the relief committee. He 
was a charter member of the Amherst club and 
served as its president for three years, always being a 
frequent visitor to the club-rooms and greatly appre- 
ciating the privileges enjoyed by members of the club. 
In 1885 he represented the Amherst district in the 
General Court. 

The following article is taken from the Amherst 
Record beautifully expresses his worth in private life : 
" In private life President Goodell was a man whose 
acquaintance was a pleasure, whose friendship was a 
boon. No matter how dark the clouds that gathered 
about his pathway he looked out upon the world with 
a smiling face. There was nothing frivolous about 
him but an abounding good nature and good will that 
smoothed over the rough places of life and (lightened 
up the shadows. He wat the soul of generosity. He 
counted what he had as not his own if another was in 
need. No worthy suppliant for aid was ever turned 
away, and there was not too close inquiry Into the 
merits of their claims. The soul of integrity him- 
self, he could hardly bring himself to believe that any 
to whom he gave his trust could be dishonest. A fine 
speaker in public, his conversational powers when 
exerted In private among his intimate associates 
were a source of continuous pleasure. Such men as 
President Goodell are rare at any time, In any com- 
munity. When they pass from life's activities Into 
the mysteries of the beyond the feeling of sorrow and 
loss is tempered by the strong assurance that spirits 
such as theirs can never die, that happiness some- 
where awaits them." 



COMMUNICATION FROM GIDEON H. 
ALLEN, CLASS OF '71 • 

I have read with deepest regret of the death of 
President (Prof.) Goodell, as we older ones continue 
to think of him. To us old classmen It seems like 
the loss of an old friend after long years of pleasur- 
able acquaintanceship. We claim, or at least feel, a 
closer relationship than would seem to result from the 
contact of younger classes with their Instructors. 
There is a certain friendliness or spirit of fellowship 
which always finds peculiar expression and lasting 
substance among the pioneers In any undertaking. 
and we who were the pioneers of our alma mater as 
students are no exception to this rule, but enjoyed to 


















138 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



a rather unusual degree, I am prone to think, the felic- 
ity of such relationship. The spirit of fraternity and 
fellow-feeling was not confined to the students alone, 
but extended to and embraced the members of the 
faculty as well. There existed among the students 
and faculty of the early days of the college a mutual 
feeling of confidence and esteem which was good to 
experience, and which left a lasting fragrance of 
pleasant memories. At the opening of the college 
Professor Goodell, then a quiet young man himself 
but a short time out of college, was a boy among the 
boys so to speak, always good-natured, even jolly, 
and fully sympathetic with the students in all that 
engaged or interested them. Yet there was no lack 
of dignity on his part and he had the full respect of 
every student, maintaining perfect decorum and disci- 
pline in the classroom without any apparent effort. 
He always held an attitude of perfect fairness towards 
all students, and exercised patience in his dealings 
with them. He was a proficient Instructor and a 
conscientious painstaking teacher. Though the for- 
tunes of life have separated us so that later meetings 
with him have been very Infrequent, I have had more 
or less correspondence with President Goodell and 
our acquaintanceship has seemed quite as fresh as 
though we had been thrown more together. And I 
feel that in his death I have lost a friend, and the 
college and the state, an efficient and faithful 
servant. 



A TRIBUTE TO PRESIDENT GOODELL. 

TO THE EDITOR OF THE STANDARD i — Professor 

Henry H. Goodell, who recently died on his way from 
Savannah to Boston, was one of those peculiarly lov- 
ing men who have not so much the faculty but the 
inherent .'^position that brings them Into close and 
affectionate relations with students, giving him a 
wonderfully ennobling Influence on the lives and 
character of young men. 

Born and brought up in the city of Constantinople, 
and a veteran of our Civil war, his fund of stories was 
delightful. 

Living amongst the students in one of the college 
dormitories, he came closer to the college lives of the 
boys than any other professor, and his Influence during 
his long years of service was wholly for truth and uplift- 
ing of character, 



This slight tribute of praise is effectlonately rendered 
by one who was in his student class thirty years ago. 

Charles F. Lawton. 



Colleg? Notts- 

— Taylor, Yeaw, and Hatch have been elected a 
committee on the senior class bed. 

— F. C. Cutter, '07, was unanimously elected 
assistant manager of the baseball team. 

— A. H. M. Wood has returned to college after a 
week of practical work at his home in Easton ; inci- 
dentally taking in a fishing excursion. 

— Strain, '06, has been surveying the college 
grounds, during the past week, for data to be used by 
President Brooks In his fertilizer experiments. 

— In a recent Issue of American Florist credit was 
given to Dr. Stone for his work in soil sterilization, 
which was well illustrated showing the results of his 
experiments. 

— The college band will give Its first concert on 

the campus next Saturday. Bandmaster Holcomb is 

working hard to develop a good band, and the outlook 
is very promising. 

— Mr. Francis Canning's series of articles on 
"Indoor Vegetable Gardening," which are being 
printed In the American Florist are timely and much 
praise has been heard for them. 

— There has been a change in the assignment of 
commencement speakers, G. H. Allen and G. N. 
Willis having exchanged appointments. Allen will 
take the ivy oration and Willis the class ode. 

— The freshman nine easily defeated the North- 
ampton Commercial college team, on the campus 
Apr. 22. The freshmen have some fine material 
and should end the season with a good record. 

— At a class meeting the following were elected 
to act as a committee for the senior prom : Taylor, 
chairman, Tupper. Gardner, Miss Sanborn, Miss 
Cushman, Lewis, Williams, Hunt, Sears, Whitaker. 
Allen and Swain. 

— The value of annual flowering plants in garden 
making was well illustrated in a recent issue of 
Gardening. Photographs from Professor Waugh's 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*39 



own garden were shown and an accompanying article 
by Mr. Canning was printed. 

— Professor Waugh has been invited to deliver the 
tri-ennial commencement address to the students of 
the Kansas State college. Professor Waugh will 
attend the commencement exercises with his wife, 
who is also a Kansas alumnus. 

— Professor Loomis of Amherst college, delivered 
another of his series of lectures to the biology class 
on April 25th. The lecture was well attended and 
appreciated by all who heard it. Dr. Loomis always 
makes his lectures interesting as well as Instructive, 
and many thanks are due him for his untiring efforts. 

— The college was recently the recipient of a 
choice collection of geraniums from Gerard college. 
Philadelphia, the sender being Mr. Edwin Lonsdale. 
The varieties are new to us and we expect they will 
materially assist in ornamenting the grounds around 
the plant house. The collection of geraniums at the 
house is becoming rich in variety and we feel much 
indebted to Mr. Lonsdale for his generosity. 

— The local teams about college formally opened 
the baseball season on Patriot's day ; never before 
had the bulletin board been so full of challenges. 
The greatest interest centered in the afternoon 
game between the Thompson House, captained by 
Wellington, '06. and the North College led by 
Filer, '06. Lack of space prohibits us from going 
into details of the game, but the salient points were 
the difficult somersaults turned by Captain Wellington 
and the phenomenal record of 24 strlke-outs by 
Cutter of the North College team. The score of 31 
to 4 in favor of North College tells the tale better 
than words. 

/Athletic Notts- 

OPENING OF BASEBALL SEASON. 

Wesleyan 9 ; M. A. C„ 2. 

The first game of the season was played with Wes- 
leyan at Middletown, April 19, resulting in a victory 
for Wesleyan. The fielding of both teams was 
ragged at times showing the effects of the short time 
for practise. But for the 6th inning however, In 



which Wesleyan scored six runs, the playing was fast. 
For Wesleyan Clark excelled and for M. A. C. Drap- 
er at short stop played an excellent game. 

The score : 





WESLEYAN. 












A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Hancock, r. f. 


5 


1 











Bristol, lb. 


5 





1 


2 





Clark, p. 


3 


1 


2 


5 





Morgan, c. f. 


4 














Haley. 3b. 


3 





10 


1 





Anderson, ss. 


3 


1 


3 


1 





Smith. 2b. 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


Taylor, c. 


4 





9 


1 


2 


Campaigne, 1. f. 
PhlMps. 1. f. 


3 


2 


1 








1 














Totals. 


34 

M. A. C. 


8 


27 


11 


5 




A.B. 


a. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


Grady. 1. f. 


4 


1 


2 





1 


Ingham, c. 


4 


2 


7 


1 


1 


Martin, lb. 


4 





8 





1 


Hunt, 2b. 


4 





S 


3 


2 


Draper, ss. 
Cobb. c. (. 


4 


1 


2 


S 





3 





1 


1 





Tlrrell, r. f. 


3 





1 








Crosby. 3b. 


3 











1 


Kennedy, p. 


3 





1 









Totals, 32 4 27 10 6 

Innings. I 23456739 

Wesleyan, 10 2 6 0—9 

M, A. C. 10 10 0—2 

Runs— Smith, 3, Anderson, 2, Campaigne, Hancock. Bristol, Haley, 
Ingham, Grady : two-base hits. Hancock, Smith : first base On balls — Clark; 
struck out— Bristol. Morgan. 2, Taylor. 2. Haley, Anderson, Grady, 2. 
Draper, Tlrrell, 2, Crosby, 3, Kennedy, 2 ; batters hit— Haley. Anderson, 
Smith ; passed balls— Taylor, Ingham. 



Holyoke, 19; M. A. C, 4. 

On April 24th. the team met defeat at the hands of 
the fast Holyoke men. Our team was nervous and 
erratic for the first three innings in which Holyoke 
scored 16 runs. But when Cobb was placed in the 
box the team braced up and for the rest of the game 
played fairly well. It was an Interesting game to 
watch despite the large score as the playing at times 
was very fast. Cobb did excellent work as did Tlr- 
rell and Hunt. The men batting freely at times 
accouts for the score. 

The score : 





HOLYOKE. 












a. a. 


a. 


P.O. 


A. 


a. 


Larkln, sa. 


2 





1 


2 





Deal, lb. 


4 





10 


1 





Hummel. 3b. 


4 


2 





1 


2 


Hartley, c. (.. ss. 


6 


4 


1 


2 





Hlckey, 2b. 
Farrel, 1. f. 


6 

4 


2 
2 


3 
3 


4 







Rementer. r. f.. c (. 


5 


1 





1 





Connolly, c, r. f. 


5 


1 


2 








Hodge, p. 
Shlncel, e„ c. f. 


2 
3 







6 









Sommers. p. 

















McCabe, p. 


2 





1 


1 






Totals. 



43 



12 



27 



13 


















Mo 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»4« 




Grady. I. f. 
Ingham, c. 
Martin, lb. 
Hunt, 2b. 
Draper, as. 
Cobb, c. f., p. 
Tirrnll, r. f. 
Walker, 3b. 
Kennedy, p., c. f. 
Chase, lb. 

Totals. 

Innings, 
Holyoke. 
M. A. C. 



A. B. 


B. 




P. o 




A. B. 


4 












1 


s 


2 




11 




2 


1 







6 







4 


2 




3 




3 


3 







2 




2 1 


4 







1 




3 1 


4 


1 




1 




1 


3 


1 




2 




3 1 


4 












2 1 


2 







1 




1 


34 


6 




27 




16 8 


1 2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 


4 5 


7 








2 


1 0—19 


3 





1 








0—4 



Runs— Larkin. 2, Deal, 3. Hummel, 4, Hartley, 4. Hickey, Farrell, 3 

" ir, Hodge, Ingham. Hunt, Draper, Cobb 

, Rementer. Farrell. Connolly; two-ba 

Hartley 2 ; first base on balls— off Ho 

dy, 3 Cobb, 9 ; left on bases, Holyoke 8, . . 

Hodge I . McCabe 4, Kennedy, 2, Cobb, 6 ; hit by pitcher, Larkin ; double 



Rementer, Hodge, Ingham. Hunt. Draper, Cobb ; stolen bases— Hartley. 
Hummell, Rementer. Farrell. Connolly ; two-base hit — Hartley; home runs 
—Farrell. Hartley 2 ; first base on balls— off Hodge, 2, Sommers, McCabe, 



ey 2 ; first base on balls— oft Hodgi 
Kennedy, 3 Cobb, 9 ; left on bases, Holyoke 8, M. A. C, 6 ; struck out, by 
Hodge 1 . McCabe 4. Kennedy, 2, Cobb, 6 ; hit by pitcher, Larkin ; double 
plays, Hickey to Larkin to Deal ; Tlrrell to Marcin ; passed ball, Connoly 
Time — 2 hours. Attendance— .300. Umpire— Cray. 

Holy Cross, 10; M. A. C, 2. 

Our team met its third defeat at Worcester on 
Saturday last at the hands of Holy Cross, For the 
first five innings the game was fast but in the sixth 
our team weakened and lost the game. 

With the score 2 to 2 for five innings, Hoey started 
to break up the game in the sixth, by lining out a 
home run. Carrigan and Barry followed with hits 
and scored, while Cashen and Ennis also crossed the 
plate, later on errors on the part of Cobb, Walker and 
Draper. 

In the eighth, Holy Cross sent her total up to 10 by 
sending Barry, Cashen and Ennis across the plate on 
timely hitting, aided by a couple of errors by Grady. 

Cobb pitched better ball than the score indicates, 
as he struck out nine of the Holy Cross players, and 
with better support would have shown much better 
results. Hoey's home run, Flynn's steal of home 
and Draper's one-handed stop were the features. 

The score : 



HOLY CROSS. 



Cahitl. c.f. 
Spring, r.f. 
Fiynn, lb, 
Hoey, l.f. 
Carrigan, c. 
Barry, ss. 
Cashen, 2b. 
Ennis, 3b. 
Mansfield, p. 

Totals, 



Grady, l.f. 
Ingham, c. 
Martin, 3b. 
Walker. 2b. 
Draper, ss. 
Cobb, p. 
Tlrrell. lb, 
Hunt. r.f. 
Kennedy, c.f. 



B.H. 



I 

2 

2 

I 
2 



1 
1 



P.O. 
3 

1 

9 
2 
5 
1 

3 
3 




10 27 



M. A. C. 



1 

2 

1 
3 


1 
2 




P.O. 


7 
1 
1 

3 

9 

2 



A. 





2 
2 

1 
2 



A. 


3 


2 
S 
I 






Totals, 



10* 23 



II 



Innings, 123456789 

Holy Cross, 20000503 —10 

M. A. C, 110 0—2 

Runs made— By Barry 2, Cashen 2, Ennis 2, Spring, Fhrnn. Hoey, Car- 
rigan. Ingham. Tirrell ; two-base hits— Hoey, Ingham, Carrigan ; three- 
base hit— Hunt ; home run— Hoey; stolen bases— Barry 2, Cashen 2. 
Ennis, Flynn, Walker ; struck out— by Cobb 9, by Mansfield 2 ; sacrifice 
hit— Spring ; hit by pitched ball— Ingham ; passed ball— Carrigan ; umpire 
D. M. Riordan ; time— 1 hour. 45 minutes. 
*Cobb out in eighth for not touching first. 

Colby, 10; M. A. C, 5. 

The first home game was played on the campus 
May I , with Colby resulting in a victory to the latter. 
Up to the eighth inning the game was fast but M. A. 
C. went into the air then and Colby aided by two 
errors and five successive singles scored six runs. In 
the ninth M. A. C. took a brace, scoring three runs 
but could not tie the score. Cobb, Kennedy and 
Ingham played excellent ball. Kennedy also showed 
more of his old time form than In the last few games 
he has pitched. Colby's entire team fielded well and 
succeeded in bunching their hits well. 

The score : 



Colby. 



Tribon, l.f. 
Dwyer. c. 
Craig, 3b. 
Coombs, r.f. 
Willey, lb. 
Tilton, 2b. 
Pile, c.f. 
Pugs ley, ss. 
Reynolds, p. 

Totals. 



Martin, 3b. 
Tirrell. lb. 
Hunt, l.f. 
Ingham, c. 
O'Grady. r.f. 
Cobb. 2b. 
Draper, ss. 
Chase, c.f. 
Kennedy, p. 

Totals. 29 4 27 8 7 

Innings, 123456789 

Colby, 00200206 0—10 

M. A. C. 10 10 3—5 

Runs— Tribon 2. Dwyer 2, Craig 2, Coombs, Willey. Tilton. Reynolds. 
Hunt. Cobb, Draper, Chase, Kennedy ; stolen bases— Tilton, Cobb ; sacri- 
fice hits— Pugsley, Kennedy, Ingham ; two base hits — Coombs, Craig. 
Dwyer and Cobb; first base on balls — off Reynolds 5. off Kennedy 5: 
struck out by Reynolds 7. by Kennedy 8 ; hit by pitcher — Ingham 2. 
Draper ; passed balls— Ingham, Dwyer 3 : umpire— Raferty ; attendance, 
500 ; time— I hour, 30 minutes. 



A.B. 


B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


6 














4 


2 


10 








6 


3 


2 


1 


1 


6 


3 


1 


2 





4 


1 


9 








4 


2 


3 








4 





2 


1 


2 


5 








5 





4 


1 





4 





43 


12 


27 


13 


3 


A.»- 


B.H, 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


5 





2 


2 


2 


4 





7 





1 


5 





2 





1 


1 





11 








3 


1 











3 


2 


3 


2 





2 








2 


3 


3 














3 


1 


2 


2 






Oscar J. Brown, managing editor of the Syracuse 
university Daily Orange, has been expelled from the 
university, because he refused to prove or deny an 
editorial printed In the Orange, March 22. This 
article classifies several Syracuse courses as " cinch " 
courses, and states that Syracuse is obtaining the 
reputation of a college where no work is being done. 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

The subject upon which the Autocrat wishes to 
speak is of so delicate a nature he fears to undertake 
It but he believes that the best interests of the 
college demand it. It is hoped that whatever he 
says will be taken with a feeling of magnanimity and 
unselfishness by those whom it may concern. The 
baseball management is complaining of the students 
not paying the tax. It is true that they are not. 
But there must be a strong reason why this Is as it is. 
In past years, the managers both in football and base- 
ball have had but comparatively little difficulty in 
carrying on the season, but this year the absence of 
the necessary money may compel the abandoning of 
the season. The reason for this apparent disinter- 
estedness on the part of the students leads the 
Autocrat to what he desires to say. The few defeats 
we have suffered can not account for it for we are 
optimistic to a sufficient degree, as has been shown 
in past years to pass over such trifling dlscouragments 
and work on harder and more enthusiastically for 
the upbuilding of our athletics. There is a more 
potent and cogent reason for the condition we are in. 
It is a fact that the student body is dissatisfied in the 
way the making of the team has been carried on. 
This feeling has not stopped with the students them- 
selves but is apparent even in some of the 
players. Without any more Introductory words 
the Autocrat will endeavor to show the reasons for 
the present dissatisfaction. We have now on the 
baseball squad eleven or twelve men ; at the start of 
the season over twenty men reported but have been 
dropped out one by one. This process of weeding 
out candidates so early in the season in any such 
wholesale manner when players are as scarce as they 
are in so small a college is not the right thing. We 
can not expect to develop players or good batters in a 
week or so. But evidently this has not been the 
thought of all. Many of those who first reported 
were told they were not wanted within a week. 
Several new men then reported but were given only a 
few days right to practice and then dropped. The 
Autocrat can see no reason why a squad of eighteen 
to twenty-five men can not be kept practising as well 
as ten or twelve. Just what the idea is in keeping 
so small a squad the Autocrat cannot see. To him 



it seems that a large squad with several men all 
trying for a single position is of the greatest benefit. 
It will stimulate and enliven the whole practice for no 
one man Is sure of his place In such a case as he is 
under the present conditions and will work and strive 
to hold his place. When a man himself feels that 
there are men better than he, then it is that a reduc- 
tion in the squad should take place, not forcibly but 
by the willingness of the player himself. And then 
all personal feelings should be entirely lacking, it is 
not for one's self as in a business, that he Is working 
but It Is for his Alma Mater for which he should give 
up all personal desires and wishes for the promoting 
of its good name. 

One other thing that has helped to bring about 
this much deplored state Is the fact that individual 
players are shifted so much about. It Is hardly to be 
expected that a man who has been working for weeks 
for one positon can suddenly take another position 
and do his best there. If a man can not hold the 
position he has endeavored to, he should not be run 
into another place but be put where he can keep 
practising — If such a man were dropped and Is a 
lower class-man a season Is lost to him in which he 
can develop for succeeding years. 

Another thing that is working in the same direction 
Is the neglect and the carelessness of the players in 
regard to training. Cigarettes and late hours are the 
constantly appearing evils. If the players themselves 
show no more interest in their own wellfare than to 
violate the ordinary rules of training, how can we 
expect any great enthusiasm on the part of the 
student body? 

It is for these reasons that the Autocrat accounts 
for the dissatisfaction felt. If the season is to con- 
tinue he feels that a radical change must be made so 
that the confidence and help of the student body can 
be again obtained. He has suggested the difficulties 
but he feels unable to offer any timely suggestions 
for the betterment of the conditions as they now exist, 
even if It was his place to do so, which he knows is 
not. 



♦ 



Harvard College yard has been Increased by three 
acres by the purchase of the Greenleaf estate on 
Brattle street, Cambridge. 









M2 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE OPENINGS FOR OUR GRADUATES. 

The avenues open to graduates in agriculture 
increase in number and variety with each year. For 
a time the agricultural colleges and the experiment 
stations absorbed those who cared to enter the profes- 
sional lines of agriculture, and the fertilizer trade was 
the main outlook of the agricultural chemists on the 
industrial side. In the course of time State boards 
and departments of agriculture added agricultural 
graduates to their forces, and the National Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, as it developed and differentiated, 
recruited its corps of workers quite largely from that 
source. 

Gradually private enterprise began to employ such 
men, and the creamery industry now claims many 
operatives trained in the dairy school. Manufacturing 
establishments which stand in close relationship to 
agriculture find it advantageous to have men on their 
force who are experts in agricultural lines, and this 
advantage is especially noticeable in establishments 
which include among their products or by-products 
materials designed for spraying, feeding, fertilizing, 
and other agricultural uses. Railroads are coming to 
find use for such men, as are also large development 
enterprises of various sorts. The landscape gardener 
is in steady demand for city parks and private grounds, 
and the farm superintendent or manager of large 
estates who has had a college training is becoming 
more common every year and more sought for. 

The usefulness of the economic entomologist in the 
practical walks of life was long ago recognized, not 
only as an investigator but in the protection of trees 
and shrubs of parks and cities. Many municipalities 
now number such an officer, as they do also instruct- 
ors in the elements of agriculture and in gardening in 
the public schools. Already a field appears to be 
opening up for the consulting agricultural expert in 
well-to-do communities to furnish expert advice on 
the laying out and management of estates, and simi- 
lar matters. 

The agricultural press has long recognized the 
advantages of agricultural training, and now that the 
demand has grown upon it for more advanced and 
technical information, men who have studied the 
science as well as the art have become a practical 
necessity upon the editoral staff. The introduction 
of such men has raised the grade of the agricultural 



paper very materially. To better fit graduates for 
this work one agricultural college has established dur- 
ing the past year a course in agricultural journalism 
which appears to be a timely departure. 

The widespread development of popular interest in 
agricultural matters, in nature study, and In the 
country generally has opened up a considerable field 
to the agricultural writer outside the farm press. This 
field is being supplied in a way. but it were infinitely 
better if more of the popular writing on topics relating 
to agriculture were done by men of some technical 
training in that subject, who could more clearly see 
the bearing of things and more logically and truthfully 
interpret what they saw for the benefit of the trusting 
reader. This will probably come in time. There is 
surely an important place for the trained agricultural 
writer, both in popular and more technical lines. 

The various branches of agriculture proper, such 
as general and special farming, stock raising, dairying, 
fruit growing, market gardening, floriculture, the nur- 
sery business, and the like, afford all the advantages 
to the educated man that they ever did, and men are 
going from the agricultural colleges to these Industries 
in increasing numbers. The fact that their agricul- 
tural education makes them more intelligent, resource- 
ful, and better farmers and more progressive men 
generally is no longer a matter of question. Their 
neighbors will watch them for suggestions and come 
to them for advice when something new turns up. 

These are only a few of the lines of industry In 
which the agricultural graduates now find an active 
demand for their services. Other avenues will open 
up — are opening up every year, now that the meaning 
of an agricultural education is becoming understood. 
Already it appeals to a large constituency. It touches 
the life and the industries of the people at so many 
points that new uses for men who have elected that 
course are bound to arise continually. There Is 
always room for those who wish to engage in the 
business side of agriculture. There has been a restric- 
ted field for specialists who desired to follow it pro- 
fessionally. To a large body of young men who do not 
care to enter either field, the diploma of the agricul- 
tural college Is now a passport to remunerative employ- 
ment In a large number of lines. 

E. W. Allen, *85. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



M3 



Alu 



mm. 



. '83— Dr. H. J. Wheeler, Director of the Rhode 
Island Experiment Station, was In Amherst last week. 
'96 — L. J. Shephard has removed from Farm 
School, Pa., to Morris Plains. N. J. 

Ex-*00 — W. R. Crowell has recently returned to 
the East from Aurora, III., where he has been for 
nearly three years. He returned to Boston to accept 
the position of head book-keeper for Torrey & Co., 
Beverly, the largest marble Importers in the United 
States. 

"01 — "The University Council of Columbia Univer- 
sity, N. Y. has just awarded a fellowship of the value 
of $650 to Mr. Clarence E. Gordon, a resident of 
Clinton, Mass., and a graduate of the Massachusetts 
Agricuitural College of the class of 1901. The 
Columbia fellowships, of which twenty are awarded 
each year, are among the most highly prized acad- 
emic honors in the United States and the selections 
are made from a large number of candidates." 

'04 — J. W. Gregg has removed from Mt. Pleasant 
Texas, to "Arbor Lodge," Nebraska City, Nebraska. 
He is now with C. E. Dwyer, '02. 

'04— G. E. O'Hearn with the Monpariel Cork Co., 
50 Hudson St., residence 361 W. 23rd St., New 
York City, 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment .-. .♦. 

THAT'S US. 






Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 
Sfbinghbld, ---.... Mam 



lrrt{rcoll<gi&-t*. 



1907 of Amherst has challenged 1907 of Williams 
for an interclass debate. 

The name of Washington Agricultural College has 
been changed to Washington State College. 

Harvard football candidates have already been 
called out for spring training in the gymnasium. 

In a recent address President Eliot of Harvard upon 
football said the rules did not prevent the brutality of 
the game. 

Hazing has been made a mindemeanor in the 
state of Pennslyvanla, punshable by a fine of five 
hundred dollars or six months Imprisonment or both. 

Yale, Harvard and Princeton are negotiating over 
the use of the foul strike rule in baseball. Prince- 
ton has asked Yale not to used It in the Yale- Prince- 
ton series. 






UP«TO«DATB 

Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 

»*. W. SL/OAN, 

Amhrr8t, Mass. 



E. D. PfULBRICK, '07. 



Edwards, '08. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 




M4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




The Harvard outdoor track meet will be held in the 
Harvard Stadium on June 3. 

President Shurman of Cornell has been notified 
that not a single candidate taking the qualifying exam- 
inations for the 1905 Rhodes scholarship from New 
York Stated succeeded in passing. 

At Vanderbilt University, Nashville, one of the four 
courses studied is on " American Diplomacy in the 
Orient." It is proving most attractive, especially 
for seniors and men In the Law an d Graduate 
Departments 

India received a $150,000 donation to be used 
for the furtherance of scientific research. After care- 
ful consideration an agricultural institution was 
decided upon as offering the most practical way to 
use this money. 

At Brown university, Providence, the recent kid- 
napping of Sophomores by Freshmen, culminated in 
a conflict between the latter and civil authorities. 
Revolvers, clubs and Injuries to both sides, figure in 
newspapers reports. — Ex. 

Five members of the Senior class at the New 
York College of Pharmacy have been suspended by 
Dean Rusby on charges of alleged rowdyism during 
lectures, and yesterday it was said that there is small 
likelihood that the five will appear as members of the 
graduating class on April 27. 

Missouri university has an Egyptian student who 
has been studying there for three years. His motto 
is " Free Egypt." He plans to undertake the libera- 
tion of his country, which has been in subjugation for 
2240 years. He is encouraging others of his land to 
come to this country to study, believing that this will 
hasten th*r work he is so desirous of accomplishing. — 
Ex. 

The authorities of the University of Penn. will intro- 
duce into the curriculum, beginning Oct.'l, 1905; 
a course in public health. This innovation looks 
toward filling a constantly growing demand throughout 
the country for officials specially trained in matters 
pertaining to public health. The course will include 
instructions under the following headings, sanitary 
engineering, sanitary legislation, inspection of meat, 
milk, etc., social and vital statistics in the United 
States, general hygiene and personal hygiene — Ex. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 



The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Gayer Hats and A. B. Kirech- 

banm & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN and H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON <£ THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Belle mead sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 

The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 



I 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., - 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 










cr 
< 

o 

OQ 

J 
< 

z 

CD 
CO 

o 

G) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 17, 1905. 



NO. 13 



PubHshed Fortni ehtly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural Colleee 
Students and Alumni art requested to contribute Cernmunimiinn. .w.m k- .jj j „ 

sent to .U subscriber, untiMts 7 77^1 SZSS ™r,te^d S^L^L^""' f^'™' ta T " S '° NAL *"" b * 
notify the Business Manager. ^ Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly . fe requested to 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS, JR.. 1906. Editor-in Chief 
RALPH WARE PEAKES, 1 906. Business Manager. 

CHARLES WALTER CARPENTE^^X-enTr 10 ^ ^^ZZ^OTT ,906 , 
WILLARD COLBURN TANNATT. JR.. , 906, College Notes. ArTuR Xl^AM H^.L^.'^r 01 ' ^- 

EARLE COODMAN BARTLETT. 1907. Athletics. CLINTON L » n , CC ' NS ' ' 9 ° 7 ' Alumnl No,es ' 

HERBERT LINWOOD WHITE. 1908. Sar^ MRTra t L« 

MARCUS METCALF BROWNE, 1908. 



T.rm., ,,.00 p«, ^, „ , deanc ,. Sln8l> c.,,,., |0e . Po^,^^^ ^^^^ 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



L. H. Moseley, Pres. 
R. W. Peakes. Manager. 
W. A. Munson. Pres. 
J. E. Martin, Sec. 



Athletic Association, 

Base- Ball Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Seven Index. 

Fraternity Conference, 



Basket-ball Association, A. T. Hastings. Manager 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 

W. O. Taft, Manager. 

M. H.Clark, Manager. 

C. W. Patch. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Editorials. 



The tennis tournament has begun, the list of 
matches has been placed on the bulletin board, and 
soon the games one after another will be played. 
That this is a pleasant feature of college life was well 
proven last year. This year It should prove equally 
successful and interesting if not more so. An 
unknown but costly prize awaits the victor and for this 
the best efforts of the participants will be directed. 
The greatest interest naturally centers on the last 
few games and we all Impatiently await their 
coming. 



The conditions of baseball for the remainder of the 
season are not bright as we wish. With Walker 
and Draper missing from the squad a serious loss 
is felt. But although an arrangement has been 
made to fill these vacancies the strength of the Infield 
is much weakened. But there is no need for dis- 
couragement and in the face of these unfortunate 



happenings we should throw everything that will tend 
to brighten and strengthen the prospect?. Captain 
Kennedy and Manager Taft are doing their utmost to 
finish the season with success. The co-operation of 
the student body is needed now more than ever 
before and all should give their best endeavors in the 
behalf of the Interests of baseball. The one fact that 
Is to be much regretted and disapproved is the appar- 
ent neglect of the players to keep up a rigid training. 
The Autocrat in the last issue spoke of this evil but It 
seems that little attention was paid to it. We believe 
that this one thing has caused the student body to so 
openly express their disapproval. If the players them- 
selves show but little Interest, certainly we can only 
expect the inevitable. The Brown game Is before us. 
Although the general sentiment of the college is that 
we shall not be able to win. we can see no reason 
why it should be so. The team defeated Trinity, one 
of the very best college teams of today, and with the 
rest of the season before us to develop and strengthen 
the team ought to come back from Providence 
carrying the flag of victory. 












146 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



/Uhletic t*oUs. 



BASEBALL. 

M. A. C, 1 ; Trinity, 0. 

On May 3d, our team went to Hartford and In a 
fast game defeated Trinity. 1-0, It being Trinity's 
first home game. Cobb and Badgley engaged In a 
red-hot pitching controversy, the honors being about 
equal. Up till the ninth Inning neither were able to 
score but In the ninth a single by Hunt, followed by a 
two-bagger from Ingham, enabled Hunt to cross the 
plate scoring the single run of the game. Up to the 
eighth Baegley allowed but one hit. Cobb was 
equally effective, allowing but one bunt which Morgan 
beat out and one hit by Powell. Several times Trin- 
ity had men on bases, but owing to fast playing by 
our men they were unable to score. In the fourth 
Inning a fast double plav by Tlrrell and Martin shut 
out a possible chance for Trinity to score on Powell's 
long drive for two bases. The fielding on both sides 
was sharp and fast. The few mlsplays were due 
partly to a heavy gale blowing across the diamond but 
these errors counted but little against the fine work of 
the fielders. 

The score : 



M. A. C. 



P.O. 



Martin, 2b. 
Tirrell. lb, 
Hunt. If. 
Ingham, c, 
Grady, cf . 
Draper, ss, 
Shattuck. rf , 
Kennedy, 3b, 

Totals. 



Morgan, cf. 
Lanfeldt. 3b, 
Powell, ss. 
Madden, rf, 
Clement, lb. 
Bowman, If, 
Burwell, If. 
Dravo. c. 
Badgley, p, 



4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 





I 
1 
1 








2 


3 





9 


t 





1 








7 


1 





1 








1 


2 


1 


3 








2 









33 



Tiiimitv. 



Totals, 



Innings. 

M. A. C. 
Trinity, 



I 






2 





3 






A.I. 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 

32 

4 





I 



I 










5 






27 



P.O. 



2 

10 

2 

12 


27 
6 7 





10 









1 


1 


1 














2 








3 


1 


1 





2 






8 





9 

I — I 

0—0 



r- ^JJ n r H S nt - T?"?: ba £ hl, »-l"Kh»m. Powell. First base on balls-Off 
Cobb 4. Passed bails- Dravo 2. First base on errors-Trinity I MAC 
3, Struck out— By Cobb 7; by Badgley 12. Double plav- -Tlrrell and 
Martin. Left on bases-Trinity 5, M. I C. 5. Um P lre-M%elte Time 
— I hour. 30 minutes. 



M. A. C, 7 ; Rochester University, 1. 

On the afternoon of May 13. we easily defeated 
Rochester on the campus by the score of 7-1. 
Rochester was unable to hit Cobb successfully and 
this with the excellent fielding of the M. A. C. team 
accounts for the score. The first two innings were 
fast neither side scoring but in the third Martin singled 
and stole second. Tirrell drove one to short stop but 
the ball was fumbled at first. Martin and Tirrell both 
advancing one base. Hunt then got first on another 
error. Martin scoring and Tirrell gaining third In con- 
sequence, Ingham then hit safely bringing two runs in 
but the next three men at bat were put out. In the 
fourth Reld scored for Rochester owing to poor 
fielding and throwing by our men. During the rest 
of the game our team hit wel I and fielded well bring- 
ing in four more runs and shutting out of Rochester 
Cobb pitched a fine game stj Iking out ten men and 
allowing only four hits. Ingham played his position 
like an old timer and excelled at the bat. For Roch- 
ester Wilder deserves credit for his fielding and Bedell 
for his batting getting three of the visitor's four hits. 
The score : 



M. A. C. 



A.B. 



B.H. P.O. 



Martin. 2b. 










4 




1 


? 


2 




| 


Tlrrell, lb. 










4 






7 







i 


Hunt, ss, 










4 







1 


2 




n 


Ingham, c, 










3 




2 


II 










Grady, if, 










4 




1 


1 


1 




n 


Cobb, p, 










4 




1 


1 


3 






Shattuck. If, 










4 







n 







n 


Clark, m. 










a 







i 







n 


Kennedy, 3b. 










2 







3 







1 


Total. 










32 




6 


27 


a 




3 








ROCHISTER. 
























A.B. 




a. 


P.O. 


A. 




B 


McDowell, 3b. 










4 







1 


I 




n 


Taggert, ss. 
Sullivan, c, 










4 
2 




1 



1 
n 



2 




n 


Bedell, m, 










4 




3 


7 










Reld. 2, 










4 




1 





3 




1 


Munger, lb, 
Chapin, If, 










4 







7 







? 










4 







3 







n 


Fisher, rf. 










4 







3 






2 


Wilder, p. 










3 







1 


2 






Total, 










33 




s 


24 


9 




7 


Innings. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


1 


6 


7 


8 


9 




M. A. Cm 










3 





? 





n 


2 


0—7 


Rochester, 













1 














0- 


-1 


Runs— Martin. 


Tlrre! 


. Hunt 


Ingham 


, Gradv. 


Clarke, Kennedy. 


Reid. 


Total bases— Massachusetts 


9. 


Rochester 


5. 


Sacrifice 


hits— Martin. 



McDowell. Stolen baaes-Tlrrell, Ingham, Grady. Clarke, Reid. Fisher. 
Two-base hit-lngham. Three. base hit— Tlrrell. First base on balls— 
Sullivan 2 Ingham. Clarke, Kennedy. Struck out-Grady, Shattuck 2, 
Clarke 3, Kennedy, Wilder, Chapin, Fisher, McDowell 3 Bedell Reid 
■ un e er - B *"e'' hit.— Martin. Double play-Fisher to Munger. Time- 1 
I hour, ^0 minutes. Umpire— Raftery. Attendance— 200. 

This afternoon the team plays Springfield Training 
School on the campus. This promises to be a lively 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



M7 



game as Springfield has played well this year. 
On Saturday next the ream goes to Wllliamstown to 
play Williams. Although this is one of the hardest 
games to play we should win If the standard of the 
test two games Is kept up. It is hoped that many of 
the students and alumni will make an effort to be 
present. Manager Taft can undoubtedly obtain lower 
rates if quite a number go. 



Co'lfcg* Not*$. 



The commencement invitations will soon arrive. 
Hutchings, ex-'05, now a student in Mass. Tech, 
college visited college last week. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Brooks attended the Unitarian 
Conference held in Florence on Tuesday, May 9. 

Wellington. '06, has been doing practical horticul- 
tural work on the estates of Prof. Emerson and H. T. 
Cowles. 

The junior class have appointed E. P. Mudge, R. 
Wellington and A. H. M. Wood to act as a committee 
on class the tree. 

E. W. Newhall Jr., E. A. Back and R. L, Adams 
attended the annual Junior promenade at Smith col- 
lege last Wednesday evening. 

Draper, ,08, had the misfortune to seriously injure 
his knee In a practice game and It is feared that he 
will not be able to play again this season. 

Maj. Anderson has entered a rifle team in the 
intercollegiate contest which Is to be held In June, 
each team shooting on its respective range and reports 
are sent to officer in charge of contest. 

The senior appointments of men eligible for com- 
mencement speaking have been announced by the 
faculty as follows : A. D. Taylor. Westford ; J. F. 
Lyman, Amherst ; Miss E. C. Cushman. Amherst ; 
R. L. Adams, Jamaica Plains ; H. F. Thompson. 
Jamacia Plains and A. N. Swain. Dorchester. 

Prof. F. S. Cooley, manager of the local alumni 
baseball association is developing a strong team from 
among the alumni and will arrange a game to be 
played with the senior class team during commence 
ment week. This game is looked forward to with 
great expectations and will be well worth seeing. 



There will be a meeting of the executive committee 
of the M. A. C. Associate Alumni at the home of J. 
B. Paige, secretary, this afternoon to discuss plans 
for Commencement. 

W. A. Tannatt. '06. has left college to take up 
engineering work in Easthampton. During the last 
few weeks his eyes have become weakened thus 
compelling him to leave his books for a time. Our 
feelings of loss are slightly tempered by the thought 
that he has obtained an excellent position at high 
wages. We all wish him much success and a speedy 
recovery. 

The Flint Six from the junior class has been 
selected by Professor Babson as follows : C. W. 
Carpenter. Monson ; W. H.Craighead. Boston; E. 
F. Gaskell. Hopedale ; A. F. Hayward, Amherst ; L. 
H. Moseley, Glastonbury, Conn; R. W. Peakes. 
Newtonville. These appointments have been awarded 
both for excellency in the composition of the orations 
and in their delivery. 

Among the many new magazines none have begun 
life under more favorable circumstances than the 
Country Calender, a monthly publication in the Interest 
of outdoor life. The May numbsr. which is the 
first, is very attractive and Interesting, and contains 
among other things, an article on Angling by Ex- 
Presldent Cleveland, Nothing better can be said 
that the entire Issue was sold soon after it appeared. 
Prof. Waugh is one of the editors and feels very 
sanguine of its success. 

The legislative committee on Agriculture educa- 
tion and military affairs visited college on Friday. 
May 12. On the evening before they were given a 
banquet In the Amherst house by the faculty of the 
college. After attending chapel, a thorough Inspec- 
tion under the guidance of President Brooks, was 
made of the different departments, with special refer- 
ence to the bill which appropriates a little over $50- 
000 for a new horticulture building and other Improve- 
ments. It is hoped that th- petition for a duplicate 
dynamo will be granted, since the members of the 
Senate have seen for themselves how badly one Is 
needed. The military committee inspected the 
battalion In the morning and expressed their approval 
In flattering terms. 















T 






*4* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






At a recent meeting of the College Senate the 
choosing of Sophomores for competition for the prize 
of $25 offered by the Western Alumni association 
for the Sophomore who shows the greatest improve- 
ment in characher and general conduct in studies and 
college work over his freshman year. Eight men 
were selected as having shown great improvement in 
general conduct. The records of these men in their 
studies will be investigated and at a future meeting 
three men selected from the eight that have improved 
most in that line. The final decision will be made by 
the faculty. 

The faculty have granted the petition of the sen- 
ior class that a speaker be obtained to deliver an 
address at commencement instead of having orations 
by the six seniors leading in scholarship— Wlnthrop 
E. Stone, M. A. C. '82, President of Purdue Uni- 
versity, Lafayette, Indiana, will deliver the address ; 
Rev. Calvin Stebblns of the Unitarian church of 
Framingham, will deliver the Baccalaureate sermon. 
Rev. Stebblns was in our late President Goodell's 
class of Amherst college and was a very intimate 
friend of his during his life. He delivered the eulogy 
at President Goodell's funeral. 

The following members of the freshman class have 
been picked by Prof. Babson. as candidates for pre- 
liminary speaking. From this list eight will be chosen 
complete, at commencement, for the Burnham prizes : 
T. A. Barry, Amherst ; M. M. Browne, Maiden : W. 
J. Coleman, Natick; S. L. Davenport, North Grafton; 
A. D. Farrar, Amherst ; C. L. Flint, Amesbury ; A. 
J. Anderson. North Brookfield ; K. E. Gillet. South- 
wick ; J. A. Hyslop, Rutherford. N. Y. ; H. M. Jen- 
nlson, Mllbury; D. P. Miller. Worcester ; D. Larson, 
Bridgeport. Conn. ; J. R. Parker. Poquonock. Conn. ; 
W. F. Turner. Reading ; T. F. Waugh. Worcester ; 
H. L. White. Maynard; R. D. Whltmarsh, Taunton. 

Secretary Ellsworth of the state board of agricul- 
ture recently gave out the details of the summer 
meeting of the state board of agriculture. It will be 
held In Lowell. July 25. on the grounds of the Middle- 
sex North Agricultural society beginning at 9-30 a. m. 
The forenoon will be devoted to demonstration 
exercises of various sorts with a wide range of interest. 
Then will come the dinner in the hall, after which 
will be an address by ex- Gov. N. J. Bachelder of 



New Hampshire, lecturer of the National Grange. 
It is expected that some of the professors of our 
college will speak. Invitations will be extended to 
all the Agricultural organizations In the state, Includ- 
ing the state Grange, the Fruit Growers association, 
the Cattle Dealer's association, the Creamery asso- 
ciation, Farmers' Clubs and all Horticultural societies. 
On Friday. May 13, the junior class in chemis- 
try, under the guidance of Dr. Charles Wellington, 
visited Holyoke and Springfield, investigating some 
practical demonstrations of their studies. The 
Springfield Gas Works were visited first and a thor- 
ough Investigation made of the process of gas making. 
The Springfield Brewery was next visited. Here the 
process of beer-making was seen and appreciated. 
Dr. Wellington then took the entire class to the 
Cooley Hotel, treating them to a good dinner. In 
the afternoon they returned to Holyoke and Inspected 
several paper mills, noticing all the minutest details 
of the processes Involved In paper-making. From 
here they went to the Mount Tom Pulp Mill and wit- 
nessed the making of pulp, returning home late In 
the afternoon. The trip was a grand success and 
very Instructive. The class is under great obligation 
to Dr. Wellington for his efforts and heartily thank 

him for the pleasure and Instruction they received. 

■«- 

THE TRACK PROPOSITION. 

Owing to a complication of hindrances and obsta- 
cles the agitation in favor of the long heralded track 
and athletic field has subsided at least for this semes- 
ter. Still It cannot be said that nothing was accom- 
plished towards making the project more possible, for 
it was found that the faculty, that is a majority of 
them, were in favor of It and President Brooks went 
so far as to communicate with the committee of the 
trustees on buildings and grounds. As a result they 
agreed to send their most Interested member In that 
line, Mr. Draper, up here to view the site of a pro- 
posed temporary track around the campus. The 
campus was measured and it was found that by a 
short overlap, a one and one-half mile track could be 
laid out so as not to Interfere with either baseball or 
football games. These measurements were taken In 
preparation for Mr. Draper's arrival, but as unfortun- 
ately Mr. Draper has been quite ill he was prevented 
from coming and without the consent of the trustees 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



M9 






nothing could be done. It Is some satisfaction, how- 
ever, to know that had their representative come he. 
undoubtedly, would have approved It. 

The plan of President Brooks is to lay out a tem- 
porary track to serve until we can have a fully 
equipped athletic field, which time is not so many 
years off. The track would run around the campus, 
beside the tar walk, back of the backstop, around out 
side of football limits up along the back road, skirt 
the drill hall to the walk again. The soil Is of such a 
texture that it would, upon removal of the turf, pack 
Into a very satisfactory running track. At the first 
hardly any grading would be needed and practically 
the only expense Is the removal of the sod. 

A broad jump box has been constructed and stand- 
ards erected for the high jump ; these have already 
been well patronized but as yet no records broken. 

That we need a track none can deny and at last 
there seems to be some real, possible means of get- 
ting It. If. however, to get it means to antagonize 
our other already established athletics, baseball and 
football. It Is far better to leave It alone. Its proper 
place is not to antagonize or enter into competition 
with the others but to help them, to serve as a train- 
ing school for raw material, to dcvelope wind, endur- 
ance, speed, and quickness, all of them highly valua- 
ble to the athlete no matter whether he play baseball 
or football. Then In the many contests connected 
with track athletics there Is usually one In which we 
can do something and by practising along this line 
gain perfection. If anyone breaks a college record 
in the presence of proper officials he Is entitled to 
wear the " M " all covet so dearly. This If nothing 
else Is some encouragement to skill In this line. It 
would be from these very men that the material for 
other teams would come. The captains of the differ- 
ent teams by watching the track candidates could 
soon pick out men with the qualities they wanted, 
men whom they had perhaps overlooked or had failed 
to come out. It would be easy to persuade such a 
man to come out for other teams, for when a man 
enters one branch of athletics he soon takes up others. 
Nothing has been said about the Influence our 
meets with other colleges would have upon our enter- 
ing classes and renown. It seems as If this was too 
self-evident to need any further mention. 
It can then be truthfully said that although the 



movement for a track has practically been laid aside 
for this year, it has accomplished a good deal In find- 
ing out the disposition of the trustees, faculty and 
student body in the matter. In other words a real 
earnest Interest has been found to exist and definite 
plans have been laid so that It seems that a track, if 
run as outlined, will receive the support of all and be 
constructed at no far distant date. 




INFORMAL DANCE. 



On? of the most enjoyable and successful of the 
Informal dances of the year was held In the Drill 
Hall on the afternoon and evening of May 13. The 
fates were kind giving a warm pleasant day so that 
many enjoyed the walk around the campus between 
dances. The patronesses were Mrs. W. P. Brooks 
of Amherst. Mrs. E. Forestall of Amherst. Mrs. 
Orcutt of Smith, and Miss Rogers of Mt. Holyoke. 
Warner's five piece orchestra rendered the music 
and Brown of Amherst catered. 

The following were present : J. H. Belden. '02. 
and Miss Proulx of Hatfeld ; H. M. White. '04. and 
Miss Farrar of Mt. Holyoke; R. C. Kibby, and Miss 
Bennett of Mt. Holyoke ; R. H. Glfford of Spring- 
field and Miss Osgood of Amherst ; R. L. Adams 
and Miss Mitchell of Smith ; G. H. Allen and Miss 
Barker of Smith ; H. D. Crosby and Miss Goodell of 
Dwight ; J. J. Gardner and Miss McGee of Amherst j 
C. S. Holcomb and Miss Holcomb of Tarlffvllle. 
Conn.; J. L. Lyman and Miss Murlless of Mt. Hol- 
yoke ; E. W. Newhall, Jr. and Miss Peers of Smith ; 
W. M. Sears and Miss Taylor of Indian Orchard; A. 
N. Swain and Miss Swain of Smith ; A. D. Taylor 
and Miss Hagermann of Mt. Holyoke; C. L. Whlta- 
ker and Miss Dodge of Smith, P. F. Williams and 
Miss French of Smith ; G. N. Willis and Miss Lee 
of Mt. Holyoke ; F. L. Yeaw and Miss Goodnow of 
Amherst ; E. P. Mudge and Miss King of Mt. Hol- 
yoke ; F. C. Pray and Miss Hall of North Amherst ; 
H. A. Suhlke and Miss Holyoke of Holyoke ; C. H. 
Chadwick and Miss Livers of Boston ; E. D. Phlbrick 
and Miss Abbott of Smith; H. P. Wood and Miss 
Willard of Smith ; Carlton Bates and Miss Montvllle 
of Northampton; K. E. Glllett and Miss Glllett of 
Southwlck; J. C. Pagllery and Miss Carney of Mt. 
Holyoke ; J. R. Parker and Miss Woodward of Mt. 



»50 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Whitmarsh and Miss Mitchell of 



Holyoke ; R. D 
Mt. Holyoke. 

The fifth and last informal dance of the college 
year will be held in the Drill Hall on Saturday after- 
noon and evening, June 3. 



USE OF EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETINS 

Those of us who are intending to take up work 
along the lines that the experiment stations are inves- 
tigating will do well to avail ourselves of every chance 
to obtain the bulletins that they publish as a reference 
for future work. They give the results in a clear 
concise manner and stimulate individual thought and 
action. To get them merely to be able to say one 
has so many bulletins is of no use but an abuse of the 
privileges offered, a collection, however, selected with 
a little thought and of allied subjects is a big help and 
a good nucleus around which to start a practical 
working library. 

A promiscuous reading of bulletins does but very 
little if any good. At best it results in a lot of crazy 
generalities and we get enough of those as it is. A 
very good way Is to get all of the bulletins obtainable 
at the time on the subject to be studled.and then read 
them all before taking up another line. There is, 
however, another way which seems still better. 
When we graduate we are supposed to know 
most of the processes treated of In the bulletins but 
when put on the land with success or failure before 
us it is sometimes hard to remember just what that 
method was that we used to recite so glibly in the 
class-room. This is just where the second way of 
using the bulletins comes in. When planning out the 
season's work, as you should do. you will of course 
know what crops you are to plant or what practices 
you intend t fallow, now turn to your handy little bul- 
letins and read those treating of the subjects to be 
followed the following season. This refreshes your 
mind on the subject, recalls discussions heard and will 
save you the humiliation of appealing to one who isn't 
supposed to know, No one will be any wiser but 
yourself and your ready knowledge will convince you 
or your employer that you are a pretty smart fellow, 
a thing that helps the salary end of things. 

Now as to the care and preservation of bulletins. 
The fact that they are so handy to carry around with 
one also makes them easy to lose, so it is evident 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



that some way ought to be found to keep them. Two 
ways then, suggest themselves correlated with the two. 
methods of use. The first way is to take all the bul- 
letins that you have obtained on a subject and have 
them bound at some book-binders, first making out 
an index. This you can get done rather cheaply and 
it makes a handy book for reference. Its objection is 
that as new bulletins appear you will have some 
bound and some unbound and are liable to lose them 
before enough accumulate for another volume. The 
second way is as follows : As you receive your bulle- 
tins number them in a prominent place on the outer 
page, placing them in large filing envelopes containing 
from ten to twenty each and placing on the outside of 
the envelope the numbers of the bulletins contained 
in it as (15-23). Then take a stout note-book of a 
convenient size and beginning alphabetically write 
down the subjects on which you have bulletins and 
place opposite each the numbers you gave to the bul- 
letins on those subjects. For instance : Corn 

Bulletin 13-15 etc., or still better tell the specific 
point taken up by each bulletin. Thus you have a 
handy index to your bulletins and it Is capable of 
unlimited growth without losing its simplicity. The 
card index suggests itself but it seems to be imprac- 
ticable as it is fussy and requires a case for the cards 
and cannot be carried with one as can a book index. 
The whole sum and substance of the thing is this, 
if you get bulletins for their worth, arrange them so as 
to get the greatest value out of them, it matters little 
how, as long as you do. The government yearly dis- 
tributes a college education through these bulletins. 
It rests with us whether or not we take the course 
offered. The degree given is that of Increased 
knowledge and earning capacity. 



«5i 



ANNUAL MEETING OF WESTERN ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION. 

The Western Alumni Association of M. A. C, held 
its annual meeting at the Sherman House, Chicago, 
IlL.on April 29, 1905. While there were only nine 
members present, what the meeting lacked in numbers 
was made up in enthusiasm and fraternal good feel- 
ing. The following officers were chosen for the com- 
ing year: President. A. F. Shiverick, '82, of Chi- 
cago; vice-president, J. L. Field. "92. of Chicago ; 
secretary and treasurer, A. B. Smith, '95, Chicago ; 



trustees— W. E. Stone. '82. President of Purdue 
university. Lafayette. Ind.. L. A. Nichols. 71. of Chi- 
cago. H. J. Armstrong. '97. of Chicago, P. C. 
Brooks. '01, George W. Miles. 75. of Miles City. 
Mont. 

The death of our beloved President and Teacher. 
Henry H. Goodell. was made known to the members 
of the association only a few days before the annual 
meeting. Resolutions of sympathy were sent to his 
family and to the college faculty. 

Those attending were : W. H. Greene and L. A. 
Nichols 71, E. B. Bragg 75. A. F. Shiverick '82, J. 
L. Field '92. A. B. Smith '95. H. J. Armstrong and 
J. L. Bartlett '97, and P. C. Brooks. '01. 

A. B. Smith, Secretary. 



REPORT OF MANAGER OF BASKETBALL 

TEAM, 1964-1995. 

RECEIPTS. 
Sale of tickets. 
Newport, 
Brown, 
Tufts. 
Andover, 
Taxes, 
Season tickets. 




$212 25 



EXPENSES. 



Holy Cross, 

W. P. I., 

Brown and Newport, 

Hotel. 

Northampton Y. M. C. A., 

Storrs. 

Registration, 

Tufts and Andover, 

Telephone. 

Printing, 

Supplies, 

Stamps, 

Incidentals. 

Balance on hand, 

$212 25 
(Signed) H. J. Franklin, Auditor, M. A. C. A. B. 

The students of Kentucky university have organized 
a club which they call the "Lampas." The object 
of the club Is to look after the best interests of the 
University, and a man must be one of serious Inten- 
tions to join it.— Br. 



$ 5 00 
20 00 
48 36 
15 75 

5 00 
12 00 

1 50 

43 96 

3 21 

6 85 
29 15 

6 25 
12 32 

$209 35 
$2 90 



SENIOR CLASS THESES. 

The conditions underlying the preparation and writ- 
ing of the senior theses are the same as for previous 
years. They are to be In by the end of May and can 
be of any length. The subjects which are chosen 
represent the works of the various departments in 
which the seniors are working. Following Is a list of 
the seniors with the subjects of their theses : 
R. L. Adams, " Dwarf Fruit Trees." 
G. H. Allen. •• Some Insecticides and their Uses." 
H. L. Barnes, " Systems of Orchard Management." 
F. A. Bartlett, " Peach growing In New England." 
H. D. Crosby. " Florists Crops." 
Miss E. C. Cushman. •• Some Entomological Pests." 
J. J. Gardner. " Some Injurious Insect Pests." 
R. P. Gay. " Mushrooms." 
W. B. Hatch. •• An Original Plan for Grading and 

Planting the Estate of A. L. Hardy." 
C. S. Holcomb. " Bacteria In Milk and Butter." 
T. F. Hunt. " Carnations." 

N. D. Ingham, " Apple Orcharding in the Connecti- 
cut Valley." 
J. R. Kelton. " Some Injurious Insects." 
E. T. Ladd. "Ethyl Alcohol." 
C. W. Lewis. " Orchard Tillage." 
J. F. Lyman, " The Function of the Mineral Elements 

in Plant Growth." 
W. A. Munson. •• Shade Trees." 
E. W. Newhall Jr.. •• Washington Navel Oranges." 
G. W. Patch. " A Grade Design for South Campus." 
Miss M. L. Sanborn, " The Home Fruit Garden." 
W. M. Sears, " Asparagus Growing In New England." 
A. N. Swain. •• The Nursery In the United States." 
A. D. Taylor. •• Grade Designing with Reference to 

Landscape Architecture." 
H. F. Thompson. - Market Gardening In Eastern 

Massachusetts." 
Bertram Tupper. ** Silage Manure versus. Barnyard 

Manure." 
L. S. Walker. " Starch, Its Formation and Determina- 
tion." 
C. L. Whitaker, •• Ten Prominent Insects Injurious to 

Shade Trees." 
P. F. Williams. •• Ornamental Trees and Shrubs of 

Amherst." 
G. N. Willis, " Modern City Design." 
F. L, Yeaw. "Carnation Diseases." 






»5» 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









■ 



I 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

As Commencement approaches our minds naturally 
turn to the thoughts of one more class numbering 
among our alumni and of the entrance of another 
class in the fall to fill the space thus left empty. The 
entrance of the class of 1909 means another midnight 
struggle for supremacy, a night filled with misgivings 
and uncertainties for the strugglers and one looked for- 
ward to with Impatient expectations to those who will 
endeavor to lead their charges on to victory. But 
what hopes can any have for victory under the present 
plan. Year after year have the two opposing classes 
clashed together, each with no other object but to 
keep pounding and slugging straight ahead, not minding 
whether friend or foe is in front. The object of all 
this chaos is, it is told us, (incidentally It might be 
said the Autocrat has never seen any results) for one 
class to so completely annihilate the other as to drive 
them from the campus. If one should give the mat- 
ter a little hard thinking the absurdity and foolishness 
of this becomes apparent. One hundred and twenty 
fellows, probably nearly equally divided, fighting mass 
against mass, individual against individual, during 
nearly opaque darkness, with no help or suggestions 
to what they are to do ; the result is always the same, 
It can be nothing else. Neither one nor the other 
can be clearly victorious and so as the years roll by 
one by one the various Senates announce a draw. It 
is time that this should stop and next year is the 
opportune time for a new and decent scheme. 

Recently the Autocrat heard a rumor concerning 
the abandoning of the old custom of class rushes. If 
there is any foundation to this rumor it Is only to be 
regretted. The class rush should most certainly 
exist but not as it has been in the past. Some 
scheme should be adopted whereby there will be 
some definite goal, some never-failing method so that 
the question of a draw becomes an impossibility. 
Right here is a chance for the present Senate to 
exercise its Intellectual mind by providing some plan 
whereby the element of brutality will be eradicated 
and in its place an element of honest sportsmanlike 
feeling be apparent. The Autocrat hopes that some 
method will be adopted so that the sympathy of the 
student body will be gained and one which will give as 
great a chance for exercise as does the old plan but 
will also possess the possibility of a decisive 
termination, 



A. H. KIRKLAND APPOINTMENT. 

On May 17, Gov. Douglas sent in the following 
nomination to the executive council : Archie H. 
Kirkland, M. A. C. '94, of Reading, to be superin- 
tendent for suppressing the gypsy and brown-tail 
moths, the compensation to be fixed by the governor 
and council, under the provisions of the act which the 
governor signed on Tuesday, May 16. Mr. Kirkland 
for the past few years has been entomologist for the 
Bowker Insecticide company. The nomination of 
Mr. Kirkland was unanimously confirmed by the 
council and his salary was fixed at $5000. Mr. 
Kirkland is a recognized authority on all Insects that 
can be classed among the enemies of trees. He has 
published several books and pamphlets on the subject, 
many of which have been embodied in the annual 
reports of the board of agriculture, by which he was 
employed a few years ago as assistant entomologist. 
In fact, most of the literature issued by the state 
board of agriculture on this particular subject In 
recent years has been prepared by him. When the 
old gypsy moth commission went out of existence, 
four or five years ago, and the state crusade against 
the pest ceased, for want of appropriations by the 
Legislature, Mr. Kirkland left the service of the 
state to accept a position with the Bowker fertilizer 
company ; but he has continued his Interest in the 
problem and on all Important matters relating to It 
has been consulted by city and state authorities. 
This year more than ever his service as a lecturer 
has been in demand by private organizations, inter- 
ested in the extermination of the pest and for the 
most part he has given his service free of cost. His 
knowledge of the subject was recognized by the 
department of agriculture in Washington, and he was 
engaged to assist Dr. Marlatt of the bureau of ento- 
mology in investigating the condition of the infested 
district of Massachusetts in the fall of last year. In 
that search nearly every moth colony In the state was 
located, and the statement that Mr. Kirkland knows 
the situation in Massachusetts more thoroughly than 
any other man is generally accepted. The Massa- 
chusetts association for the suppression of the gypsy 
and brown-tail moths, which was formed last winter, 
with Senator Jones of Melrose as president, was 
guided by his advise and counsel In framing the bill 
upon which the present law Is based, Ever since 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*53 



the pest started in Medford Mr. Kirkland has followed 
its progress from year to year, and is regarded as the 
most logical man for the position to which he was 
appointed yesterday. 

Mr. Kirkland worked at the college insectary a 
short while after graduation and is the author of a 
bulletin on -'Frogs" and "Toads," an article 
regarded as one of the highest authority on the 
subject. 

The salary to be paid is one of the highest paid to 
any commissionship in Massachusetts. In regard to 
the amount the Springfield Republican editor has the 
following to say : So A. H. Kirkland. who is to be 
superintendent of the efforts to suppress the gypsy and 
brown-tail moths, is to receive a salary of $5000. 
This will strike the average citizens as " thumping " 
big pay. Don't we get Chairman Jackson of the 
railroad commission for that sum, and isn't that our 
highest paid commlssionership? The advent of Mr. 
Kirkland looks costly, but that this moth business 
always has been. In the life of Massachusetts the 
$5000 public places are few and far between. 

There is no question that $5000 is a large salary. 
Gov. Douglas evidently, in making this appointment 
salary, believes that a high priced competent man is 
the cheapest and he is repeating in his administration 
of state affairs what he does In the execution of his 
own private business. The College Signal wishes 
Mr. Kirkland all success. 



HORTICULTURE. 

Those who read the Horticultural and Florist 
magazines have perhaps noticed articles written by 
our fellow students in college. It seems as though 
right here is a mighty good sign of the efficiency 
which these students are acquiring in their several 
special lines of study. If first class up-to-date papers 
which have capable, experienced men as editors and 
correspondents, are willing and even glad to publish in 
their columns material written by M. A. C. students, 
it is a good criterion of the value of the training they 
are receiving here at college. Only a short time ago 
people held the wrong idea that theoretical or so- 
called " book-farming " was entirely useless but 



though still common this Idea is being steadily 
crowded out and superseeded by a feeling of more 
confidence in scientific agriculture and horticulture. 
This is especially true here as has been proven time 
and again by the success of our alumni for the 
science taught in the class room is exemplified in the 
field, and often the operations are carried on by 
students themselves. A combination of both theory 
and practice is thus placed within reach of every one 
who desires. 

In an April number of Horticulture R, L. Adams, 
'05, had an article which is one of a series entitled, 
" Some Greenhouse Pests " giving a brief account of 
the Insects and methods of treatment. An article 
also appeared on the subject of "Sweet Peas," 
signed by Higgins. '07. It was an interesting as well 
as instructive account of the writer's personal exper- 
ience of success in growing the flowers. 

Mr. Canning wrote an article for the April 1 5th 
number of Gardening, entitled " Annuals for Garden 
Making. " Illustrations were shown from Professor 
Waugh's garden. 

On Tuesday, May 9th., the senior class In flori- 
culture with Mr. Canning visited Mt. Holyoke college 
and inspected the grounds and greenhouses there 
the different methods of planting that are used 
also. They were the guests of Mr. A. S. 
Kinney, M. A. C. '96, floriculturist and instructor of 
botany at the college. A very enjoyable and instruc- 
tive day was spent and much thanks is due both Mr. 
Kinney and Mr. Canning for their efforts to make It 
such. 

Prof. L. H. Bailey of Cornell university gave an 
informal talk to the senior horticultural division on 
May I Oth. He spoke concerning his work for the 
next three years which is to be spent In compiling an 
encyclopedia of agriculture in four volumes. Pro- 
fessor Bailey will arrange the subject topographically 
and hopes to complete his work in three years. These 
volumes will be eagerly sought for when completed 
as Prof. Bailey's reputation as an authority in this 
line has spread over the entire country. 

AGRICULTURE. 
At the seminar held on the 5th of May Mr. 
Forrestall, the superintendent of the college farm 
gave a very Interesting Informal talk on " Sterile 









154 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 












Milk. " He said that there is a movement toward 
regulating by law the number of bacteria contained 
in milk which is placed on the Boston market. The 
proposed number which is to be set as a limit is 
fifty thousand to the cubic centimetre. Even this 
seems at first a tremendous number, but as milk is 
often sold, many times this number are present 
People are coming to demand purer food and more 
wholesome milk and hence there are good openings 
near the metropolis for dairy farmers who know how 
to produce sterile milk. An example of what can be 
done was described, namely the Walker-Gordon 
company situated at Charles River station near 
Boston. Here the best possible sanitary conditions 
are obtained by special stable construction, ventilation, 
proper feed, proper care and frequent sterilization and 
disinfection. Under these Utopian and still practi- 
cable conditions milk is kept remarkably free from 
the ever present bacteria and as a consequence com- 
mands nearly three times the price of ordinary milk. 
Even though every producer cannot afford to maintain 
this high state of sterility yet there is a good lesson 
to be learned which is too apparent to need 
explaining. 



Alu 



mm, 



ATTENTION ALUMNI I 

The Senior Promenade of the class of 1905 
will be held on Tuesday evening, June 20. Those 
members of the alumni who desire to attend may 
receive invitations and have their " Prom " pro- 
grams filled, by sending word to A. D. Taylor, 
chairman of the committee. Men coming back 
for cl. s reunions should not miss this year's 
prom. 

73._Rev. J. B. Renshaw, Hillyard, Washington. 
R. F. D. 

78. — Edward C Choate died of appendicitis Jan- 
uary 18, 1905, at Southboro, Mass. 

•89. — Married at Indlanopolls on March 28, H. E. 
Woodbury to Miss Josephine Hyde. 

'90. — C. H. Jones, chemist of the Vermont Exper- 
iment Station, has recently made an Important and 
very valuable discovery. This Is a positive means 
for detecting adulterations of maple sugar. As is 



well known maple sugar Is chemically the same as 
cane sugar and no one hitherto has been able to dis- 
tinguish between them- But Mr, Jones has solved 
the whole problem, and In such a simple manner that 
his discovery is already in commercial use with all 
the large buyers of maple products of Vermont. 

'93. — Harry J. Harlow is to erect a cow barn at 
Shrewsbury for 53 cows, with patent stanchions, water- 
ing device for each cow. running water being supplied 
from a tank, cement floors and feed and litter carriers. 

Ex-'94. — George O. Sanford has severed his con- 
nection with the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board as engineer, and is now with the U. S. Geologi- 
cal Survey In the Reclamation Service. He has been 
assigned to the North Dakota Irrigation projects and is 
now located at Wllliston, N. D. 

•94.— Dr. C. H. Higgins, Pathologist to the Domin- 
ion government and In charge of the biological labora- 
tory at Ottawa, left on Monday. May 8th, for Leth- 
brldge. Alberta, to investigate a disease In horses pre- 
valent in that dislrict. His mission Is to determine 
its nature, and if possible, demonstrate Its causative 
agent. 

'94.— Ralph E. Smith, recently instructor of botany 
at M. A. C, now with the experiment station, Univer- 
sity of California, has just published an extensive, 
elaborate and very readable account of asparagus grow- 
ing in California with special reference to asparagus 
rust. 

'95. — Prof. Robert A. Cooley of Bozeman, Montana, 
entomologist at Montana Agricultural college will be 
about town with his family for nearly a month. He Is 
at present staying In South Deerfleld. 

'96.— Frank L. Ciapp. 294 North Willow street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 

Ex-'97. — Charles King, who served five years on 
the U. S. Marine Corps, being In China and the 
Philippines, visited college lately. At present he Is 
living in Boston. 

*00.— F. G. Stanley. M. D.. practising medicine at 
Essex, Mass. 

'00.— E. K. Atkins of Northampton with C. E. & 
E. E. Davis, civil engineers, is in Brattleboro this 
week, on engineering work being done by his firm. 

*02.— Charles M. Kinney, organist In a church In 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



155 



Redlands. Cal., has been granted a leave of absence 
of three months during which he will visit Japan and 
China. 

NINETEEN HUNDRED CLASS REUNION. 

The second reunion of the class of 1900 will be 
held this year at commencement. There are 20 
members of the class, 15 of whom are in New 
England and New York. It is expected from pres- 
ent Indications that 15 will attend. Supper will be 
served probably in the Amherst House. The class 
cup will be awarded at the meeting to Henry Crane of 
Ellis, who became the father of a male child last 
September. The child died in November. At this 
meeting will be distributed typewritten copies of a 
class history containing the individual history of each 
member of the class since graduation. A. C. Mona- 
han and E. K. Atkins, president and secretary of the 
class, are making arrangements. 



I ntfr collegiate. 



The State College of Pennsylvania has a national 
bank. 

The campus of Kansas University now covers 
almost 160 acres. 

The University of Illinois has received a $25,000 
scholarship endorsment from W. J. Bryan. 

Two hours of university credit is given at Chicago 
university for services In the orchestra. — Ex. 

Syracuse university Is to have a new athletic field 
and stadium, built in the form of an amphitheatre. 

Minnesota will not be represented by a baseball 
team this year, the reasons have apparently been 
given. 

Yale is now trying to set up a branch college in 
China, in the Province of Hunan. It looks at present 
as If It would succeed. 

The Big Four Railroad has allowed Purdue $15,000 
to start a gymnasium fund. It Is to be built In honor 
of the football men who were killed in a wreck last 
year. 

According to statistics, New York university incurs 
an average annual expense of $100 per man for 
instruction. Columbia and Barnard about $300, and 
Yale over $200. 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment .•. .•. 

Til ATS US. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 
SpuiNfiKiK.i.ii, --..... Mass 



UP.TO-DATB 



Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 
Amiirkst, Mass. 



E. D. PrtiLBRiCK, '07. 



Edwards, '08. 



A Full Line of 



Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM M NORTH COLLEGE. 



I 









156 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The University of Michigan has a Jap candidate 
for pitcher in K. S. Inui. and Coach McAllister 
declares that his speed is marvellous. There are also 
107 in the squad. 

The senior girls of a Pennsylvania High school 
recently struck because they were not allowed to take 
a certain study. Now they are striking again because 
they won and are regretting it. 

The new chapel for Oberiin College which is to cost 
$95,000. will be begun this spring. The number of 
students at Oberiin has increased more than fifty per 
cent, during the last four years. 

The University of Pennsylvania has a new natator- 
ium and the faculty require that every student learn 
how to swim. Ability to swim 200 feet Is the mini- 
mum at which a student Is passed in this course. 

At a recent meeting of the undergraduate body of 
the University of California, a proposal to establish 
the honor system in examinations was defeated. The 
majority of the women voted in favor of the system. 

A chess tournament has been arranged between 

Amherst and Williams to be held in Wllliamstown 

about the middle of May. A college tournament, to 

pick the men to represent Amherst has already 

started. 

Williams College students have decided to abolish 
hazing until June. If the experiment proves a suc- 
cess the rule will be made permanent. Their decis- 
ion was reached by ballot at a meeting of all the 
classes. 

Harvard has joined with 17 other institutions of the 
country for the purpose of engaging in geological 
field work this summer. Amherst. Yale, University 
of Chicago. John Hopkins, North Carolina and Michi- 
gan are smong the number. 

Phllo 5. Bennett, a wealthy citizen of New Haven, 
is placing In the hands of twenty-five schools in the 
United States the sum of $10,000. The interest of 
this will be given as a prize each year for the best 
essay on the "Principles of Free Government." 

King Victor Emmanuel of Italy has conferred upon 
Prof. Charles Eliot Norton of Harvard University the 
decoration of grand officer of the Order of the Crown 
In recognition of his service In translating Dante's 
works Into English and his service to Italian literature 
In America. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 



The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Gayer Hats and A. B. Kirsch- 

Imiini & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN akd H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON <£ THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Belie jjj Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 

The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMHERST. 



S&* 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 31. 1905. 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should bo addressed. Collbob Siomal, Amhbrst. Mass. Thb Siohal will be 
tent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS, JR.. 1906. Editor-In Chief. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES1906, Business Manager. 

EDWIN DANIELS PHILBRICK, 1907. Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES WALTER CARPENTER. 1906, Department Notes. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT, 1906. Intercollegiate 

STANLEY SAWYER ROCERS.1906, College Notes. ARTHUR WILLIAM HICCINS 1907 Alumni Notes 

EARLE COODMAN BARTLETT. 1907, Athletics. CLINTON KING. 1907. 

HERBERT L1NWOOD WHITE. 1908. MARCUS METCALF BROWNE 1908 



Term*, fl.00 per gear 1b adcancs. Single Coploa, IQc. Postage outside ol United States and Canada, Nc, extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association. 



L. H. Moseley, Pres. 
R. W. Peakes, Manager. 
W. A. Munson, Pres. 
J. E. Martin, Sec. 
Basket-ball Association, A. 



Athletic Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 
Nineteen Hundred and Seven Index. 
Fraternity Conference, 
T. Hastings. Manager. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 

W. O. Taft, Manager. 

M. H.Clark. Manager. 

C. W. Patch, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Editorials. 



We take pleasure in announcing the election of 
Stanley Sawyer Rogers, 1906, of Boston, to the 
Signal Board. 



102 Main St., - 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



The baseball team has returned from their trip in 
good condition. This was a very successful series of 
games as they won by big scores two of the three 
games played and against colleges that have showed 
up well in previous games. The entire squad deserves 
great credit for their work individually and collectively. 
That we have a team to be proud of has been well 
shown and also one that should receive the support of 
every man in college. Most of the teams they have 
played against have been those of large colleges and 
yet the fact that we are small in numbers has not 
appeared in the games. There are four more games 
to be played before the Brown game. With this 
time to develop and these games to strengthen the 
squad we shall be able to put up a strong argument 
against the men of Providence. 



Acting President Brooks and Prof. F. A. Waugh 
are the recipients of many congratulations from the 
students and alumni for their success in obtaining 
appropriations from the legislature for the new Hor- 
ticultural building and for the enlargement of other 
department buildings. Working against great odds 
and many discouragements, they with other members 
of the faculty, finally obtained what they so earnestly 
desired. That the college needed the new building 
and enlargements none have ever doubted, for under 
the present management the departments have so 
increased in their work that all the available buildings 
have been filled to overflowing. But with this new 
help the college can accomodate more students in 
certain departments and can give much more instruc- 
tive courses. We wish to extend our thanks in behalf 
of the student body for the untiring and successful 
efforts of those members of the faculty who have so 
earnestly worked for the advancement of our beloved 
Alma mater. 



We wish to call attention to the students in college 






I5« 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



and especially to the freshmen to one thing, though it 
might seem at first insignificant and trivial, yet is of 
a great importance. We refer to the fact that many 
pass the U. S. flag that is displayed during battalion 
drill without saluting. What kind of an impression 
must a visitor at college carry away with him if he 
sees students at a military college carelessly pass the 
emblem of our country without showing due respect? 
How much credit does it reflect upon the military 
instructor to have such things as that happen? One 
of the first things we are taught at grammar school is 
to always show respect and loyalty to our flag and yet 
here are men in college who are too careless or too 
thoughtless to take the slight trouble of removing their 
hats upon passing the flag. Think about it. Are you 
one of them? If so we sincerely hope that in the 
future nothing more of such disloyalty on your part 
will be seen upon the college campus. 



M. A. C. 



Martin, 2, 

Tirrell. I, 
Hunt, s. 



Ingham, c, 
O 'Grady, r, 
Cobb, 3, 



Shattuck, I, 
Clark, m. 
Kennedy, p, 



B.H, 

2 

1 

2 







P.O. 

1 

8 
3 
9 

2 
2 
2 




A. 

2 
2 
3 
2 

1 
4 


3 



B. 
I 



2 

1 




1 



Totals, 
Innings. 
Springfield, 
M. A. C, 



1 
6 

I 



2 





3 






4 
1 

2 



5 





6 

2 



17 
8 9 



27 
7 

0—7 
1 0—6 

Lowman, Martin, 

Hawks; Aringto-n, Me^rf. LoV^n^m. Mart^Hum. Baseo^"- 
x K n"^ y 5- Struck out-by Kennedy 6, by Shean 4. Sacrifice hi I- 

rell, Cobb and; Martin. Hit by pitched baH-Purrlngton 2, Hunt, Ingh 
Shattuck. Wild pitch-Shean. Passed baHs- Jones 2, Ingham Urn 



Runs-Cobb. Hawks 2, Purington, Metzdorf , Shean, 
int. Ingham 3. O'Grady. Three-base hit-Ingham. 



Jmplre 



/Uhletic Notts. 



BASEBALL. 

Springfield T. S., 7; M. A. C, 6. 

On May 17, the team was defeated by Springfield 
T. S., 7-6, on the campus. Springfield landed 
heavily on Kennedy and filled up the bases in nearly 
every inning but owing to sharp and fast fielding only 
one run was made after the first inning by the visitors. 
The game was full of sensational plays, time after 
time with bases full and none out the Springfield boys 
were unable to score. Our team deserves great 
credit for their work and for the grit and perslstancy 
with which they tried to win a game that was practi- 
cally lost In the first inning. Tirrell and Hunt played 
excellent bU for M. A. C. and Prettyman and Low- 
man excelled for Springfield. The score : 



Dartmouth, 6; M. A. C, 2. 
On May 19, the team went to Hanover and played 
Dartmouth. This game was not scheduled but 
owing to it being "Prom" week at Dartmouth they 
wished to arrange a game to interest the visitors and 
accordingly wrote to Manager Taft who accepted at 
once. Dartmouth hit Cobb easily but M. A. C. was 
unable to meet Skillin's delivery which accounts for 
the score. We were unable to score until the eighth 
inning when Martin and Tirrell scored owing to a 
single by Martin, an error by Keady, and a hit by 
Ingham. Tirrell and Ingham played their usual good 
game and the honors for Dartmouth go to Skillen, 
who pitched a masterly game. The score : 



SPRINGFIELD. 



Cobb, I, 
Hawks, 2 
Purington, s, 
Metzdorf. m. 
Shean, p, 
Lowman, 3, 
Hill, r, 
Jonea, c. 
Prettyman, 1 , 

Totals, 



B.H. 



I 
I 


3 
2 
I 
1 



P.O. 



I 

4 

1 

1 
4 
2 
3 
I I 

27 




1 
5 


4 
2 
1 

2 


IS 



Orcutt. 2. 
Reeve, s, 
Keady, 1. 
Gardiner. I . 
O'Brien, I, 
Page, m, 
J. Ulaze. r, 
Richardson, 3 
McCabe, c, 
Skillln, p. 

Totals, 



Martin, 2, 
Tirrell, 1 
Hunt, s, 
Ingham, c. 
Walker, r, 
Cobb, p, 
Clark, I, 
Shattuck, 3. 
Kennedy, m, 

Totals, 
Innings. 
Dartmouth. 
M. A. C. 



DARTMOUTH. 



A.B. 



2 

4 
4 

3 

4 
4 
4 
4 
3 

32 



M. A. C. 



A.B. 

4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
4 
3 
4 
2 



31 



1 

4 




2 





3 





4 

I 




5 







2 
I 


I 

2 
2 





B.H, 
I 



2 


I 
I 




I 






P.O. 

I 
t 

8 
1 



1 

2 
I 



27 



P.O. 

2 

10 

4 
I 
1 
2 
1 
2 

24 

7 


2 



A. 

3 
t 

2 




1 

3 



11 



2 


I 
2 


4 

1 




B. 



I 

2 











I 


2 

1 

I 







10 
8 9 
I 0- 
0- 



reU {Un Thr^ C ^ R MT M p Keady g'Brton. P»K». Richardson. Martin. Tlrt 
reil. Three-base hit— Reeve, Keady. Richardson. Two-base hit— I 
Glaze. Bases on balls-off Skillln 3, off Cobb 2. Hit by plteher^SkElIn I 
h^ , r. 3 n 4 b r^n S u7e? ar,mOU, 8 " "' A " C " 6 ' Umpire-lJaggerty WB4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



159 



Williams, 4; M. A. C, 3. 

On May 20, our team met defeat at the hands of 
Williams at Williamstown. With the score 3 to 1 
against it at the beginning of the ninth inning, the home 
■team went in and pounded the ball in every direc- 
tion, scoring three runs and a victory after one man 
had been retired. The boys played creditably, their 
fielding being fast and clean, while Williams made 
but a single error. The game from the first was a 
contest between the pitchers, but Kennedy was far 
more fortunate up to the last inning, not a hit previous 
to that time netting Williams anything. 

The visitors, on the other hand, realized from all 
but two of their hits, a single In the first scoring Mar- 
tin after he had reached first on four balls and stolen 
second, and three hits in succession in the seventh, 
netting two more runs. In the sixth Tirrell made a 
long drive into left center field, but Nesbitt caught a 
hot liner and doubled him between third and home 
unassisted. Williams's only run before the ninth 
came from a base on balls and an error in the second. 
In the ninth Warren led off with a hit, and Tirrell 
dropped Martin's throw in an attempt to retire Har- 
man. McCarthy followed with a long hit that scored 
Warren and Osterhout, who ran for Harman, crossed 
the plate on a long drive into center field, which Clark 
dropped. Nesbitt ended the game by a hot drive 
through Hunt at short. A one-handed catch by Tir- 
rell, Nesbitt's double play, and Wadsworth's three 
base hits were features of the game. The umpiring 
of Kellher during the last few Innings was very unsat- 
isfactory as he showed decided partiality. It seems 
that Williams was over anxious to even up their 
defeat at our hands in football last year. The score : 



Innings. 
Williams, 
M. A. C, 



1 



I 



2 
1 





3 






4 





5 







6 






7 

2 



8 9 

3—4 

0—3 



Runs-McCarthy. Hogan. Warren. Osterhaut (ran for Harman) , Martin. 
Ingham. Cobb. Total bases— Williams 0, M. A. C. 8. Stolen bases- 



McCarthy. Hogan. Harman, Martin, Hunt, Cobb. 
Wadsworth, Tirrell. 



McCarthy, c, 
Bonham, 2, 
Nesbitt, s. 
Westvelt. p, 
Hogan. I. 
Nefld, 3. 
Warren, 
Harman, 1. 
Wadsworth, r. 

Totals, 



Martin, 2. 
Tirrell, 1, 
Hunt, s, 
Ingham, c, 
Cobb, 3. 
O'Grady, r, 
Clark, m, 
Shattuck. I, 
Kennedy, p, 



WILLIAMS. 

A.B. 

5 
5 
5 

4 
2 
4 
4 
3 

4 



36 



M. A. C. 



3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
8 



2 
I 

2 



I 


1 



B. 



I 

2 
I 
1 
1 







P.O. 

8 
3 
3 
I 

2 

I 

7 
2 

27 



P.O. 

3 
9 
2 
I 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



A. 


2 

3 


I 






A. 

2 
I 

5 

4 



3 



Totals. 



31 



25 



15 



Three-base hits 
First base on balls— Hogan 2, Harman, Martin. 
Struck out-Harman, Martin, Ingham, O'Grady 2. Clark 2, Shattuck. Wild 
pitch-Kennedy Time-1 Twur. 40 minutes. Umpire-Kellher. 
Attendance— 400. *One out when winning run was made. 

M. A. C, 11; Andover, 3. 

Andover was defeated by the Massachusetis Agri- 
cultural college nine on Brothers field, on May 22, 
11 to 3. The visitors clinched the victory In the first 
inning, batting Merritt hard and scoring eight runs on 
five hits. Clow, who was substituted in the second, 
proved effective, allowing only four hits In eight 
Innings. Cobb pitched a grand game for the visitors, 
pulling out of holes by heady work when his team 
was giving him poor support. After the first Inning 
Andover put up a creditable game, in spite of the 
fact that substitutes were played at short and second, 
owing to the illness of Fels and Reilly. 

The umpiring of Clarkson was unsatisfactory, both 
teams suffering from poor decisions. The score : 



M. A. C. 



Martin, 2, 
Tirrell, I, 
Hunt, s, 
Ingham, c, 
Cobb, p, 
O'Grady, I, 
Clark, m, 
Shattuck. 3, 
Kennedy, r. 

Totals, 



Schildmlller, I, 
Clough. 1, 
Payette, s, 
Taylor, r, 
Williams, 3, 
Clifford, 2, 
Jones, c, 
Washburn, m, 
Merritt, p. 
Clow. p. 



ANDOVBR. 



B.H. 
I 


I 

2 
2 
2 
I 






B.H. 
1 

2 


2 
2 





I 



P.O. 

I 

8 

2 
B 
2 

4 
2 



27 



P.O. 


7 

I 
I 
5 
8 
4 

I 



A. 

3 

I 

3 
5 



1 


13 



A. 




I 



5 
2 


2 



4 
I 


2 

I 




I 



I. 







1 

2 







Touts, 



Innings. 
M. A. C, 
Andover. 



2 

I 



3 






4 






5 





I 






27 
7 
2 





10 3 

8 9 
l-ll 
2 0—3 



Runs— Martin, Tirrell. Hunt 2. Ingham ?, Cobb 2, O'Grady, Clark Shat- 
tuck, Schildmlller, Payette, Clifford. Two-base hitt— Clark. Cobb. O'Grady 
Two-base hit— Taylor. Stolen bases— Martin. Cobb, O'Grady, Payette 
Base on balls-off Merritt 2. off Clow Struck ouf— by Cobb 8, by Cow 7 
Double play— Cobb and Tirrell. Hit by pitched ball— Martin. Wild pitch- 
Clow, umpire— Clarkson Time— 1 hour. 35 minutes. 

M. A. C. , 15; Boston Collece, 3. 
M. A. C. defeated Boston College, May 23, on 
Franklin field, b y the score of 15 to 3. In the first 
inning the local collegians started off like sure win- 
ners, shutting out M. A. C. In one, two, three order, 












I 






1 60 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



and scoring the first run on a couple of hits. Another 
tally was added in the second, but an error by Orchard 
allowed M. A. C. to tie the score In its half. In the 
third Galvin dropped an easy pop fly, for what should 
have been the third out, and allowed two men to score. 
The B. C. team went up in the air in the fourth, 
three errors by the catcher, two by the shortstop 
and second baseman giving M. A. C. eight runs. 
The features of the game were the batting of O 'Grady 
for M. A. C. and Lyons and Orchard for Boston 
College, and the fielding of Hunt, Martin, Shattuck 
and Lyons. The score : 



COLBY. 



M. A. c. 



Martin. 2, 
Tirrell, I, 
Hunt, s, 
Ingham, c, 
Cobb, 3, 
O'Grady, !, 
Clark, m. 
Shattuck, r, 
Kennedy, p, 

Totals, 



Greene, 3, 
Cox, s, 
Orchard. 2. 
Calvin I, 
Lvons. I , 
Flatley, m. 
Kelley, c, 
Wheatley, p, 
McGinnis, r. 

Totals, 

Innings, 
M.A. C. 
Boston College, 



BOSTON COLLEGE. 



2 


2 

4 
I 
1 


10 



B.H. 



I 


3 

3 

1 
1 


1 



P.O. 

5 
4 
1 
13 
1 


1 
2 


27 



P.O. 

3 

2 

1 
II 
2 
4 
2 
1 



10* 26 



2 


3 
1 
1 





1 

2 
10 




3 
2 


2 
I 

3 


11 



Tribou, 1, 
Dwyer, c, 
Craig, 3, 
Willey, I, 
Tilton, 2, 
Starkey, r, 
Pile, m, 
Pugsley, s, 
Thompson, p, 

Totals, 



Martin, 2, 
Tirrell, I, 
Hunt, s, 
Ingham, c, 
Cobb, p, 
O'Grady, r, 
Clark, m, 
Shattuck, I, 
Walker, 3, 



4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 

31 



A. C. 



A. B. 
3 

4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
2 
3 




2 
2 

2 


I 
1 






I 
1 
1 








P.O. 



II 
1 

12 

2 
1 




27 



P.O. 

2 
12 

3 

3 



I 



1 

2 



A. 



1 
I 


5 


1 
I 



A. 

3 

6 
1 
6 



2 



E. 


1 







1 





B. 









I 
1 



Totals, 



Innings, 
Colby, 
M. A. C, 



1 





2 






3 





18 
8 9 



30 3 24 

4 5 6 7 

11116—5 

1—1 

Two-base hits— Tilton, 



2 
2 
1 



3 
2 




4 

8 




5 
1 





7 
I 





12 

9 

0—15 
0— 3 



Runs— Dwyer 2, Willey, Pugsley 2, Hunt. 
Dwyer Home run— Pugsley. Earned runs— Pugsley, Dwyer, Hunt 
Stolen bases— Pugsley, Ames, Cobb, Walker. First base on balls— off 
Thompson 2, off Cobb 1. First base on errors— Pugsley, Ames. Struck 
out— by Thompson 6, by Cobb 2. Left on bases— Colby 3, M. A C 6 
Double plays— Dwyer and Willey, Hunt and Walker, Cobb and Martin, Cobb 
Martin and Tirrell. Hit by pitched ball— Thompson, Martin, Cobb Time 
— 1 hour, 25 minutes. Umpire— John Taylor. Attendance— 400 



Run-Martin 2, Tirrell, Hunt, Ingham 3, Cobb, O'Grady 2. Clark, Shat- 
tuck 3. Kennedy, Greene. Lyons 2. Two-base hit. Lyons. Stolen bales- 
Martin, Hunt. Ingham 3. Clark 2,0'Grady.Shattuck, Lyons 4rMcCumrfes7 
Base on balls-off Kennedy 4. off Wheatley 3. StrLck out-by Kennedy 
1 2, by Wheatley 4. Sacrifice hits-Flatley, tox. Lyon" Kel'ev S/ 
Clark 2. Double play-Hunt to Martin to Tlrre" Hit by pitched ba I- 
McGuinness, Wheatley. Martin 2. Passed ball-Kelley Umpire-Rud- 
derham. Time— I hour, 40 minutes. y 

Colby, 5; M. A. C, 1. 

The 'tarn was defeated at Waterville, Me., on 
May 24, at the hands of Colby by a score of 5-1. 
Thompson held M. A. C. down to no hits until the 
last inning when, with two men out and two strikes on 
Hunt, the latter knocked a low liner to centerfleld. 
Pile errored it. Ingham and Cobb got in scratch 
hits scoring Hunt. O 'Grady was given a base on balls 
which filled the bases but Clark flied out to Dwyer 
ending the game. The game was a clean one from 
start to finish. Features were Pugsley's home run 
and the playing of Hunt and Cobb. The score : 



SOPHOMORE CLASS BANQUET. 

The sophomore class banquet was held at the 
Hotel Devens in Greenfield, Friday evening, May 19. 
Most of the class arrived in town in the early evening 
and spent the time before the banquet in exploring 
the nooks and corners of this old New England village. 
There were twenty-two members of the class present 
when they seated themselves at the table, over which 
was hung the famous 1907 banner. A discussion of 
the excellent menu was followed by toasts. Mr. W. 

E. Dickinson acted as toastmaster in a characteristic 
and felicitous manner. The following toasts were 
responded to: Our Class, H. T. Pierce; Athletics, 

F. C. Peters; The Index, C. H. Chadwick ; The 
Seniors, E. D. Philbrick; "The Powers That Be," 
W. F. Chace; Manilla Rope, J. F. Caruthers. 
Messrs. Bartlett, Hartford, King, Summers and 
Thompson spoke on various class subjects and as the 
banquet neared its close a vast amount of class spirit 
was developed which will increase as the years roll by. 
When the party broke up in the early hours of the 
morning the affair was declared a grand success and 
great praise was bestowed upon the committee, 
Messrs. Philbrick, Lincoln, Bartlett, Larned and 
Summers. The second banquet of the class of 1 907 
will always remain as a pleasant memory to those 
present. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



161 



Colleg? Notts- 



'02, is at college for a 



— Thome M. Carpenter, 
few days. 

— W. A. Munson, '05, has been spending a few 
days in Boston. 

— B. Strain, '06, visited his father at Mt. Carmel, 
Conn., on Memorial Day. 

—Miss Livers, '07, is In Boston for a few days 
visiting her sister who is ill. 

—Lieutenant A. A. Racicot, ex- '06, is stationed 
at the Marine Barracks at Narraganset Bay. 

— Prof. F. A. Waugh is instructing a class of 
grammar school pupils in practical agriculture. 

— Cowles & Howard have finished sawing the 
lumber on Clark hill and have moved away the mill. 

— A goodly number of alumni are expected to 
attend the Senior Prom, and a very successful one is 
anticipated. 

— Rev. C. S. Walker attended the State Associa- 
tion at Lowell, as a delegate from the Hampshire 
East Conference. 

— E. G. Proulx, '03, has just returned from an 
extended trip throughout the state collecting fertilizers 
for official analysis. 

— The members of the class of '03, planted another 
class tree on the evening of May 20, to take the place 
of the one which died. 

— G. W. Patch and A. N. Swain, '05, attended a 
banquet given by the Epsilon chapter of * E K at 
Yale last Saturday night. 

— The senior class bed has been laid out in the 
same place as In former years under the direction of 
Taylor, Yeaw and Hatch. 

—Privates Summers, '07, and Philbrick, '07, 
have been appointed Corporals. Corporal Carey, '06, 
has been appointed Sargeant. 

— The agriculture division of the junior class has 
completed their course under Prof. W. P. Brooks and 
has begun poultry raising under Prof. F. S. Cooley. 

— Major Hamilton Rowan, assistant inspector-gen- 
eral of the Atlantic division, with headquarters at 
Governor's Island, will inspect the military depart- 
ment the first week in June. 



—The Juniors met last Saturday evening for the 
purpose of planting their class tree. It is planted In 
front of north college. The usual customs were gone 
through and the event ended at a little past two. 

—Manager Taft has arranged to play two games of 
baseball with Springfield Training School on Tuesday, 
May 30, at Greenfield. The team will go up with the 
intentions of winning both games and they should have 
many rooters there. It is hoped that many will 
endeavor to attend. The town of Greenfield has 
made preparations for a grand celebration during the 
day and aside from the game there will be much of 
interest to see. 

— E. D. Philbrick, '07, attended the annual busi- 
ness meeting and banquet of the New England Inter- 
collegiate Press Association held in the Copley Square 
Hotel, Boston, on the afternoon and evening of May 
22, as a representative of the College Signal. In 
the afternoon an informal talk was held upon the sub- 
jects pertaining to management of college papers, 
followed by election of officers for the ensuing year. 
Representatives from fourteen college papers were 
present at the evening banquet. Toasts followed the 
supper which in turn gave way to a pleasant, Informal 
discussion of Interesting topics and questions. 

— Quite a celebration took place the night of the 
1 7th of May when news was received that the Gov- 
ernor had signed the bill to procure money to build a 
new horticulture building, paint the farm buildings, 
extend the steam heating to East experiment station, 
botanical building and new horticulture building and to 
build an annex to the entomological building. The 
celebration consisted of a large bonfire built on the 
ground where the new building Is to be erected. 
While the fire was burning several blanks were fired 
from the canon and the party ended with songs and 
an impromptu dance around the fire by the freshmen. 
On May 19, the senior and junior class in mathe- 
matics accompanied by Professors Ostrander and 
Hasbrouck, visited Holyoke looking into several 
branches of work which they have studied. They 
visited the Holyoke Water Power Co., where they 
Investigated principally the testing of the efficiency of 
turbines. This is a very interesting process and the 
class was fortunate in being able to see the various 
operations required. The Holyoke dam was next 


















l62 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



visited followed by a visit to the Dean Steam Pump- 
ing Works. The trip was interesting and instructive 
and the class heartily thanked both the professors for 
their endeavors to make it such. 



GROWTH OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

This year may be taken as marking the semi- 
centennial of agricultural education in this country. 
Fifty years ago the state of Michigan took steps to 
establish an agricultural college, which was the first 
Institution of the kind in the United States. Two 
years from now it plans to celebrate in a fitting way 
the anniversary of the opening of the college to 
students, and the occasion will be one of national 
Interest. 

The beginning of interest in agricultural instruction 
dates considerably earlier. During the forties and 
early fifties the establishment of an agricultural 
college was quite actively canvassed in New York 
and Massachusetts, and one or two abortive 
attempts were made to provide such an insti- 
tution. Professor Brewer tells us of the passage 
of an act in New York in 1853, mainly on the 
iniative of Mr. John Dalafield, providing for a state 
agricultural college to be located on his farm near 
Geneva. No appropriation was made for buildings or 
maintenance, and as Mr. Dalafield died the following 
fall nothing further came of the movement. The 
State Agricultural society was also interested in the 
subject and expected much from the People's college. 

Agricultural schools were established in various 
parts of New York by private enterprise between 1 845 
and 1850, and an agricultural school In Connecticut 
was opened in 1845 by Dr. S. W. Gold and his son 
T. S. Gold, which continued in successful operation 
until b69. In 1845 Oliver Smith, of Massachus- 
etts, died, leaving a fund of $30,000 for a farm 
school and experimental farm, where worthy young 
men could make a study of agriculture in all its 
branches. His bequest was to be allowed to accumu- 
late for sixty years, and therefore becomes available 
the present year. 

The Interest in agricultural instruction at that early 
date is the more remarkable considering the educa- 
tional conditions of the times. The teaching of 
natural science in the higher Institutions was very 
restricted, and opposition to its Introduction had hardly 



begun to be overcome. 

Technical schools for other branches were almost 
unheard of, and manual training as a branch of the 
educational system did not receive consideration until 
many years later. The public school system was 
still very crude, and high schools were rare outside 
the large cities. But there was a prevalent idea 
that science was to be of great value and of a wide 
application to the fundamental industry, and the 
plan to provide special schools for teaching the 
sciences in these applications met with considerable 
approval. 

Accordingly, when the constitution of the state of 
Michigan was adopted in 1850, a clause was inserted 
requiring that "the legislature shall provide for the 
establishment of an agricultural school for agriculture 
and the natural sciences connected therewith." In 
obedience to this provision, an act for the establish- 
ment of a state agricultural college was adopted by 
the legislature in 1855 and approved February 12 of 
that year. A farm of nearly 700 acres, then in the 
woods and lying three and one half miles east of 
Lansing, was purchased and buildings erected, and 
on May 13, 1857, the college was formally opened 
for the reception of students. 

The year following the action of the Michigan legis- 
lature, the legislature of Maryland incorporated the 
Maryland Agricultural college, the corporation com- 
prising about five hundred philanthropic persons who 
subscribed stock and purchased a farm for the college 
near Washington | and the same year Hon. Marshall 
P. Wilder succeeded in obtaining from the legisla- 
ture of Massachusetts a charter of the trustees of the 
Massachusetts School of Agriculture. 

Near the close of the following year (1857) Justin 
S. Morrill began his efforts to secure from Congress 
a land grant for the endowment of colleges of agricul- 
ture and mechanic arts, which resulted In 1862 in a 
gift of over ten million acres of land to the several 
states for that purpose. Thus the cause of agricul- 
tural education was launched. 

How slow the progress was from these early 
beginnings is well known to all students of agricultural 
education. Without method or precedent to guide 
them, with little Idea of the classification of the 
subject for pedagogic purposes, with little or no 
equipment for the agricultural department except a 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



163 



farm, which was expected to be a model and at the 
same time to demonstrate the practical ability of the 
professor in charge to make a farm pay, and above 
all in advance of the educational progress of the 
times, is it surprising that agricultural instruction was 
not an entire success from the outset? 

The agricultural schools of Europe were not 
patterned after because the conditions and needs in 
this country were so dissimilar. One man's theory 
of what should be taught and how it should be 
imparted was as good as another's, apparently, and 
there was no end of experimenting in these matters. 
There was found to be comparatively little of agricul- 
tural science to teach at that time — much less in 
fact than the founders had supposed ; and so much 
stress was laid upon the practical aspects of farming 
that the instructors were not always men of the 
highest scientific attainments. Hence the branches 
of learning supposed to be related to agriculture and 
also to promote a liberal education were often pressed 
forward, and by reason of their more advanced 
position pedagogically came to occupy a prominent 
place in the curriculum of these colleges. 

As time went on the expectations of the early 
advocates of agricultural instruction were not being 
realized. The farmers as a rule took little active 
interest in the college and were often out of sympathy 
with it. There was no considerable demand for agri- 
cultural instruction, and many of those who went to 
the college were attracted by the opportunity to 
secure an education cheaply. Other circumstances, 
such as the Civil War and the great movement of 
people to the new lands across the Alleghanies, com- 
bined to delay its progress. Where the colleges 
were connected with large universities the case 
seemed especially hopeless. There the sentiment 
against the agricultural department on the part of 
other departments of instruction was often in evi- 
dence ; and because of its weakness and its failure to 
attract large numbers of students that department 
was usually given but little either of facilities or finan- 
cial support. 

The experiences gained in several decades of 
experimenting in agricultural instruction, discouraging 
as it was, was not without result. More was being 
accomplished than appeared on the surface. Grad- 
ually the old theories of teaching agriculture were 



disproved, and better methods took their place. 
Some impression was made upon public opinion, and 
greater respect won for it as a department of 
instruction. 

To the men who In the face of these obstacles had 
been working out the basis for agricultural instruction 
and building up a more intelligent support for It, much 
credit and honor is due. They helped to show the 
value of technical education, sentiment for which was 
now growing, and by the Investigations which they 
made and collated they attracted attention to the 
growing basis for a science of agriculture, which 
broadened the possibilities of teaching the underlying 
principles of the industry. 

Then came the experiment stations, — first a few 
state institutions, which were largely an outgrowth of 
the influence of the agricultural colleges and were 
fostered by them. These In time created a demand 
for national aid, resulting in the establishment of 
st?tions throughout the country ; and two years later 
came the Morrill Fund, which supplemented the land 
grant of 1862 with a direct annual appropriation for 
Instruction. For a time it did not appear that the 
latter was to benefit directly the essentially agricul- 
tural features of the colleges, which rarely received 
any considerable allotment of the fund, the claim still 
being made that there was small demand for agricul- 
tural instruction. 

At length a few ambitious leaders set to work to 
see how the farmers' boys could be gathered Into the 
college for a short period, In order to get an entering 
wedge and to demonstrate more widely the value of 
technical training in agriculture. Grades and 
entrance requirements were swept aside. New facil- 
ities were provided. Laboratories were opened for 
dairying and farm physics and live stock, In addition 
to those which had previously existed for the sciences, 
because the inadequate preparation of the boys and 
the short time they were to spend at the college 
required that they be taught quite largely through 
their eyes and their hands. 

The experiment was an ultimate success. The 
press praised the work and helped to advertise It, and 
the farmers began to talk about It. A new era had 
begun. There was an awakening not only of Interest 
and of confidence in agricultural education, but also 
to the requirements for properly teaching the subject. 



i6 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






Agriculture must be differentiated ; instead of one 
man being looked to as the personification of all the 
agricultural information which the Institution had to 
offer, there should be an agricultural faculty. To 
provide such a faculty and adequate laboratories and 
equipment required money,— much more than the 
agricultural department had ever been given. This 
aroused opposition again, and was looked upon as 
extravagant and ill-advised. It was pointed out how 
much more it cost to educate a student in agriculture 
than in literature or the classics or general science. 

But the influence of the experiment station in dif- 
ferentiating agriculture was now working, and the 
necessities of its work soon called for men in different 
sub-divisions of the subject. Gradually the money 
was secured in a few of the states, thanks to the 
energy and perseverance and enthusiasm of a few of 
the leaders, who gathered around them strong and 
intelligent men to. aid in their campaign with state 
legislatures and public sentiment. 

The success of the few stimulated other states to 
action, and inspired confidence and courage in 
demanding creditable buildings and support, and in 
putting the course on a new basis. Men came to 
the front now who had caught the idea of the new 
education and who were not afraid, until the move- 
ment became widespread and its influence national. 
There can be no doubt that the agricultural experi- 
ment station and the short courses were very potent 
factors in bringing about this new era and In making 
the higher development possible. They served to 
arouse interest in the subject and to assert its needs, 
they confirmed the value of agricultural education, 
showed the relations of science to practice, and 
enlarged the fund of Information upon which the agri- 
cultural c ofse rested. They made instruction In 
agriculture seem not only reasonable but essential to 
a clear understanding of the progress which was mak- 
ing in applied agricultural science. And they demon- 
strated the need of specialization In the instruction 
force, brought out new methods, and modernized the 
system of instruction. We now recognize as one of 
the most important services of the experiment station 
the furnishing of the material for an organized science 
of agriculture which could be reduced to pedagogical 
form. 
A dozen years ago special buildings for agricultural 



165 



instruction were so rare and novel a feature as to 
excite much comment. This year the Territory of 
Oklahoma appropriated $7500 for an agricultural and 
horticultural building following the action of the lead- 
ing agricultural states. The agricultural colleges In 
many states are now on an equal basis with other 
departments of instruction, as far as buildings, and 
facilities are concerned, and it is Interesting to note 
that in this respect the college connected with univer- 
sities have not been behind those existing as indepen- 
dent institutions. For much of this development we 
are Indebted to the example of the states of the 
Middle West, which are not bound down by tradition 
and where there Is greater freedom of progress. 

Along with these developments In the colleges 
have come the nature study crusade and the endeavor 
to improve the country schools and to teach In them 
something pertaining to the daily life of the children. 
Out of this grew the agricultural high schools, and 
more recently the attempt to modify the course of 
instruction In the rural schools, so that they will lead 
up to the agricultural college as they now lead to the 
general science courses In professional colleges. In 
some states a point has been reached where Instead 
of bringing the college grade down within the reach of 
pupils from the poorer rural schools, a high college 
grade Is being established and an attempt made to 
articulate the common and high schools with it. This 
is a great step, and one which would have seemed 
very bold ten years ago. 

If a half-century seems a long time for the working 
out of these things which now seem so plain and 
practicable and of unquestionable utility, it should be 
remembered that agricultural education could not 
progress faster than the times, although It was con- 
ceived in advance of them. Its experience is paral- 
leled by that of science teaching and technical educa- 
tion and manual training and every other radical 
departure in education. 

During the past fifty years the public funds given 
to education have been mainly used to establish and 
maintain a system of free elementary education for 
all the people, even now this system does not fully 
reach all the children in all the states. The same 
period has witnessed the development of the public 
high schools and incorporated technical schools In 
urban communities, and an efficient system of science 



teaching in schools and colleges. Agriculture Is now 
beginning to reap the advantages accrueing from the 
settlement of the more fundamental problems of 
public education. The public mind has not only 
become thoroughly convinced that the education of 
all the people Is the duty of the state, but also that 
this education should be vitally related to the occupa- 
tions of the masses. The wisdom of agricultural 
instructions, and its tangible value to the country at 
large and to a wide range of industries directly depen- 
dent upon agriculture, have now become evident to 
pedagogue and the farmer alike, and In some meas- 
ure to the legislator as well. 

Things always move more slowly at the start, but 
agricultural education is now moving faster and faster 
every year, so that with the rapid development of 
efficient courses for it much greater progress may 
reasonably be expected in the near future, the effects 
of which will be far-reaching in our national life. 

When the Michigan Agricultural College holds its 
semi-centennial jubilee two years from now, there will 
be very much to report in the progress of agricultural 
education and the influence of the agricultural college. 
There will be great cause for congratulation over 
what has finally been accomplished, and every 
encouragment in the outlook, for it will be evident 
that the dark ages of agricultural education in the 
United States are past, E. W. Allen, '85. 



BURNHAM COMPOSITION PRIZES FOR 
CLASS OF 1907. 

The sophomores eligible to compete for the Burn- 
ham essay prizes have been announced by Prof. Bab- 
son as follows : H. E. Alley, Newburyport; A. H. 
Armstrong, West Gardner ; W. D. Barlow, Amherst ; 
J. T. Caruthers, Columbia, Tenn ; C. H. Chadwlck, 
Cochituate; J. O. Chapman, East Brewster; W. F. 
Chase, Middleboro; W. E. Dickinson, North 
Amherst; A. A. Hartford, Westford ; A. W. Hig- 
glns, Westfield ; Clinton King, Easton ; A. F. Lamed, 
Amherst; J. N. Summers, Campello ; C. B.Thomp- 
son, Halifax and R. J. Watts, Littleton. 

These men have been chosen for general excel- 
lence of work in the preparation of the three term 
essays. On Saturday, June 3, at 8 a. m., they will 
meet In the Drill Hall recitation room prepared to 
write without notes on one of the following subjects 
"The Strong and the Weak Points of Cooper's 
Work as a Novelist," "Culture and Common Sense 
In the Work of James Russell Lowell ;" the subject 
to be assigned at the above date. It is to be under- 
stood that competition for the prizes is purely voluntary. 



COMMUNICATION. 

To the Editors of the Signal : — The writer has 
frequently noticed at the various games of baseball 
played upon the college campus, that when a mem- 
ber of the opposing team makes an error or an attempt 
to catch a fly ball, especially at a critical moment, a 
portion of the student body yell at him In a taunting 
manner. The same thing often happens when the 
opponent goes to the bat, In order apparently, to pre- 
vent him from making a hit. Are not such meth- 
ods ungentlemanly, unkind, and decidedly unsports- 
manlike ? What sort of an Impression must the vis- 
itors carry away with them, after such treatment ? 
Think about it, boys! Let us cheer the home team, 
and offer every encouragement to the Individual 
player, but let us not forget to give the visitors fair 
and courteous treatment. 

J. B. Lindsey, M. A. C, '83. 



KIRKLAND'S $5000 JOB. 

Archie Kirkland, the new superintendent of the 
gypsy moth extermination plant, deserves to be con- 
gratulated not only on his job , but on the price which 
is to be paid him. The sum of $5000 a year is a 
pretty handsome figure and one that but few state 
commissioners get. The chairman of the Boston 
police commission is so honored, as is also the chair- 
man of the railroad commission. To draw the first 
salary named the man has to divorce himself from all 
other business under the statutes. To exercise the 
duties of the second place properly one is obliged to 
devote all of his time. Mr. Kirkland will have field 
work during only a certain part of each year and no 
stipulation is made as to how he shall use his 
in-between periods. It has been said, although 
how much authority there is for it is not known, that 
he is a close personal friend of the governor. — Prac- 
tical Politics. 



Purdue university has a $40,000 appropriation for 
a civil engineering building, which is to be available 
on and after November I, 1905. 






1 66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




NEW HORTICULTURAL BUILDING. 

The appropriation bill for the new horticultural 
building was signed by the governor Wednesday. 
The building when completed, including its furnish- 
ings and equipments, is to cost $39,950. The build- 
ing is to be three stories high, and is to be 50 by 70 
feet. It is to be built of brick, with a tile roof, and is 
to be fireproof throughout. The first floor will con- 
tain two large class-rooms, storage-room, a large lab- 
oratory and a room for surveying instruments. The 
second floor will provide for two business offices, a 
room for records, library and reading-room, a large 
laborator for advanced students and a museum. 
The third floor contains a class-room, large drafting- 
room for landscape gardening, photography room and 
a private laboratory. 

The building will be placed upon the piece of 
ground west of the road passing to the botanical mus- 
eum lying between Dickinson's house and the cross- 
walk. It will face to the west. Professor Waugh is 
engaged in the work of establishing grades and walks. 
W. R. B. Wilcox as architect, has spent a few days 
with Professor Waugh perfecting details. 

Advertisements for contracts will soon be published 
in local newspapers. 



OBITUARY. 

Alonzo Henry Shannon, Amherst, '06, M. A. C, 
ex :'06, died on May 21 , in Dickinson hospital. He 
had been suffering for a week with appendicitis and 
was taken to the hospital for an operation but owing to 
the long delay it was found to be impossible to save 
him. The funeral was held in the Amherst col- 
lege church. Rev. Edward F. Barrow made the 
prayer at the house, and President Harris conducted 
the service in the church. Music was furnished by 
college quartet under the direction of Professor 
Bigelow. The pall bearers were members of the 
football team of last season. Messrs. Craighead, 
Strain and Wholley of the Agricultural college 
attended the funeral as delegates from the class of 
1906. Mr. Shannon was a man of fine physique, 
being prominent in college athletics. He was of a 
genial disposition, always willing to lend a helping 
hand to his numerous friends. His loss is keenly felt 
by his many friends and classmates at Amherst 
college and at M. A. C. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whereas, It has pleased God to remove from our midst our 
friend and former classmate Alonzo Shannon, be it 

Resolved. That we, the class of 1906 of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, extend our heartfelt sympathy to his 
family in their time of sorrow. And be it further 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



167 



Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be placed in the 
class records and that a copy be sent to the College Signal 
for publication. 

William H. Craighead. ) 

Benjamin Strain, S For the Class. 

F. D. Wholley. J 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM. 

Sunday, June 18th. 
10-45 a. m. Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Monday June 19th. 
3-30 p. m. Flint Prize Orations. 
7-00 p. m. Band Concert. 
8-00 p. m. Burnham Prize Speaking. 
10-00 p. m. Fraternity Banquets. 

Tuesday, June 20th. 
9-00 a.m. Alumni Meeting. 
1-30 p. m. Class Day Exercises. 
4-00 p. m. Exhibition Drill. 
8-00 p. m. President's Reception. 
10-00 p. m. Senior Promenade. 

Wednesday, June 21st. 
10-00 a. m. Graduation Exercises. 
12-00 m. Alumni Dinner. 



Dfp&rtmftviT flo-t?s. 

HORTICULTURE. 

On Wednesday evening, May 17, Professor Beech 
of Iowa, who was the guest of Professor Waugh, 
spoke in the horticultural recitation room on Pomol- 
ogy. Although he spoke for only a few minutes, yet 
those who heard him were glad they had the oppor- 
tunity. The main drift of the talk was on the advan- 
tages of Massachusetts and New England for fruit- 
growing. The time has passed when it was said 
"Young man go west;" for the nearness to market, 
cheapness, and adaptibility of the land are all 
Immense advantages over western competition. 

After the lecture Mrs. Waugh very generously 
served light refreshments. Still further enjoyment 
was added to the occasion by the celebration out-of- 
doors for the appropriation just passed for the new 
plant house and horticultural building. The fresh- 
men made themselve useful by building a huge bon- 
fire which brightly illumined the campus and Clark 
hill. College songs were sung and the cannon was 
fired. 

The department of horticulture is naturally very 
much engaged these days in the plans for the new 
building. The work Is in the hands of a very compe- 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the •« Kinks of Fashion " 
and plenty of assortment .•. .•. 

THAI'S US. 



Haynes & Co., 



Sl'KIMiFII I .!>. 



Always Reliable. 



Maw* 



UP»TO»DATB 

Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 

Amhkkht, Main. 



E. D. Philbkick, '07. 



Edwards, '08. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 



1 68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tent and reliable architect, W. R. B. Wilcox, but 
there are many details which have to be looked out 
for and carefully considered by Professor Waugh. 
We all sincerely hope that the new building will be 
something to be proud of and it will certainly be a 
drawing card for the college. 



Alu 



mm 



ATTENTION ALUMNI ! 
The Senior Promenade of the class of 1905 
will be held on Tuesday evening, June 20. 
Those members of the alumni who desire to 
attend may receive invitations and have their 
"Prom" program filled by sending word to A. D. 
Taylor, chairman of the committee. Men com- 
ing back for class reunions should not miss this 
year's prom. 

The executive committee of the general alumni 
association of M. A. C. held a meeting Thursday 
afternoon and decided to hold the alumni dinner 
Wednesday of commencement week immediately 
after the graduation exercises. 

'89. — Charles S. Crocker is at present engaged 
with the American Agricultural Fertilizer Co. , So. 
Delaware and Wiccacoe Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

'92.— A. T. Beals, 3483 Morgan St., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

'99.— W. A. Hooker, Quincy, Fia. 

'99.— W. E. Hinds, '99, and A. W. Morrill, '00, 
are working on the cotton boll weevil In Dallas, Tex. 

'01. — R. I. Smith has recently been appointed 
state entomologist of Georgia. 

'02. — J. Herbert Belden, care of J. J. Benson, 
Hamilton Ex'ldlng, Detroit, Mich. 

'03. — M. H. West Is slowly recovering from a 
severe attack of pneumonia that has compelled him 
to leave his work as landscape architect at Kinney 
Park, Hartford, Conn., for nearly a month. He is 
at present recuperating at his home. 

'03. — W. E. Tottingham has received the appoint- 
ment as assistant chemist at the New York state 
experiment station at Geneva, N. Y. He will begin 
his work on the first of June. Since last September 
Mr. Tottingham has been instructor of chemistry at 
this college. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 



The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Gayer Hats and A. B. Kirsch- 

baum & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN and H. P. GLOVES. 



SANDERSON <£ THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



lent jjjj Sweets. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR AMIIEBST. 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV. 



AMHERST. MASS., JUNE 20. 1905. 



NO. 15 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Amhekst. Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

ADDISON TYLER HASTINGS. JR.. 1906. Edltor-in Chief. 

RALPH WARE PEAKES.1906, Business Manager. 

EDWIN DANIELS PHILBR1CK. I 907. Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES WALTER CARPENTER. 1906, Department Notes. EDWIN HOBART SCOTT, 1906, Intercollegiate. 

STANLEY SAWYER ROGERS, 1906. College Notes, ARTHUR WILLIAM HICCINS, 1907, Alumni Notes. 

EARLE GOODMAN BARTLETT. 1907. Athletics. CLINTON KING. 1907. 

HERBERT L1NWOOD WHITE. 1908. MARCUS METCALF BROWNE. 1908. 



Terine, $1.00 per year in adeance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outaide of United State* and Canada, *«c. extra. 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate, 
Reading-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

L. H. Moseley, Pres. Athletic Association 

R. W. Peakes. Manager. 
W. A. Munson, Pres. 
J. E. Martin, Sec. 



Base- Ball Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Seven Index. 

Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sac. 

W. O. Taft, Managei. 

M. H.Clark. Manager. 

G. W. Patch, Pres. 



Basket-ball Association. A. T. Hastings. Manager. 



Entered ss second-class matter, Poet Office at Amherst. 



Edi'tori&.s. 



With Commencement comes the necessary part- 
ing of friends and classmates, who for four short 
years have given their hearty support to everything 
pertaining to the advancement of Old Massachusetts. 
1905, it is with a deep sense of loss that we see 
you depart from your work here to enter Into the 
broad walks of life ; yet we cannot help but congratu- 
late you at this time for the fine record you will leave 
to your Alma Mater. In scholarship, athletics, and 
class spirit you are unrivalled and we can see nothing 
ahead for you but well merited success in the many 
fields of future work which you will enter. The 
chances are yours ; make the most of them, and In 
later years when success has crowned you all, remem- 
ber the little college nestled near the base of 
Sugar Loaf and Toby and say proudly, "To you 
Massachusetts I owe a large part of what 1 am or what 
I have. ' ' The Signal extends Its sincere congratu- 
lations to you all, Individually and collectively. We 



trust the reputation you have earned here will grow 
more and more as the coming years roll on. 



As the end of the college year approaches our 
thoughts reminlscently wander back Into the year just 
going out and to what has been accomplished during 
this time toward the advancement of our college. 
The path has been very bright, only marred by two 
misfortunes, the Senior class trouble and the death of 
our beloved friend, President Goodell. But these 
hindrances and troubles, although seemingly checking 
the college work at the time, have only tended toward 
stronger and more diligent work on the part of the 
faculty and of the students. In athletics the college 
is pushing to the front. This year has seen the best 
athletic teams In the history of the college, and what 
is more, more of that honesty, perseverance and grit, 
for which we are known so well. The social life has 
Increased to a great extent , the proms, informals and 
receptions have all been well attended and supported. 
The educational side has been wonderfully strength- 
ened and brightened. With new subjects added and 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



with the better arrangement of work we can safely say 
that a not to be forgotten year is passing by. The 
thanks of all friends of the college is due to those who 
have labored so earnestly under the difficulties and 
struggles natural to a rising college. The prospects 
for next year are exceptionally bright, the work and 
encouragement of this year will act as a constant 
help, with a new president at the helm we can all 
strive, as we have before, to make the coming year 
one of renewed and revigored prosperity. 



M. A. C, 9 



8. 



Athletic |Yo-U$. 



BASEBALL. 

M. A. C, 11 ; Springfield, T. S., 5. 

On the morning of May 30th, the team easily 
defeated Springfield Training School at Shattuck Park 
in Greenfield, 1 1-5. The Training School was unable 
to hit Kennedy with much success and this combined 
with sharp fielding accounts for the score. In the 
fourth inning Springfield weakened and M. A. C. piled 
up seven runs. 

The score : — 



Springfield, T. S. 

On the afternoon of May 30th, Springfield Training 
School ag?in went down to the men of M. A. C, at 
Greenfield. Cobb was in the box for M. A. C. and 
pitched a fast game but at times was given poor sup- 
port. It was an interesting game because the score 
was tied several times and it seemed to be anybody's 
game until the last. The honors go to Ingham for 
his work behind the bat, and to Walker for his stick 
work. 



The score : — 



Martin, s, 
Tirroll. 1, 
Hunt, 2. 
Ingham, c. 
G. Cobb, p. 
O'Grady, I, 
Shattuck, 3. 
Clark, m, 
Kennedy, r, 
Draper, 3, 



M. A. C. 



A.B. 



P.O. 



4 


4 


1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


9 





1 


5 


3 


2 


4 


n 


4 


1 


12 








4 


2 


2 


3 


2 


4 











1 


4 


1 








2 


3 





1 








4 


2 








1 


















M. A. C. 



Martin, s, 
Tlrrell. 1. 
Hunt. 2, 
Ingham, c. 
G Cobb, 3, 
O'Grady. r, 
Shattuck. I, 
Clark, m. 
Kennedy, p. 

Totals. 



Cobb. 1, 
Turner, p, 
Purinton s, 
Metzdorf, 3, 
Hawks, 2, 
Lowman. m, 
Hi'l r. 
Jones, c. 
Carrell. 1. 



4 
5 
5 
5 
3 
2 
4 
5 
4 



B.H. 
I 

3 

1 
1 
I 


1 
1 
1 



38 10 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 



A. B. 

4 
5 
3 

4 
4 
3 

4 
4 
4 



B, 



1 

2 


2 

1 




P.O. 

2 
10 
I 
12 


2 



27 



p. o. 
1 


1 

3 
4 
2 
2 
5 
9 



A. 

3 

2 
2 
I 




2 



Totals, 



Cobb. 1. 
Turner, m, 
Purinton, s, 
Metzdorf, p, 
Hawks, 2, 
Lowman, 3, 
Hill, r, 
Jones, c. 
Carrell. 1. 
Goodwin, m, 



35 



15 



27 



SPRINGFIELD TRAINING SCHOOL. 
A.B. B. 



3 





1 








4 








I 


2 


3 





4 





1 


5 


2 





8 





3 





1 


2 


1 


4 


2 


3 


3 


I 


4 





2 


2 





4 





5 








4 


2 


8 








1 















36 



I 







4 

3 



5 
3 





6 
3 
3 



24 

7 





16 



8 
1 




9 

— 6 
2- 8 



Totals. 



35 



27 



10 



Innings, 123456789 

M.A. C, 7 10 3 0—11 

Training School, 10 12 10—5 

Runs— Martin 2. TirreM 3, Hunt, Ingham, O'Grady. Shattuck Clark, 
Kennedy, Cobb, Turner. Furinton. Lowman 2. Total bases— M A*C 1C 
Training School 6. Sacrifice hit-Metzdorf. Sto'en bases— Martin', Hunt,' 
Ingham. G Cobb 2, O'Grady 3, Cobb, Lowman 3, Jones. First base on 
bals-o'f Kennedy. Cobb. Purinton : off Turner. Martin. G. Cobb O'Grady 
2. Left on bases— M. A. C. 8. Training School 6. Struck out— by Ken- 
nedy. Turner 2. Purinton, Metzdorf 3. Hawks 3. Hill. Jones. Carrell ; by 
Turner. Clark 3. Kennedy. Batters hit- Purinton— Lowman, Martin 
O'Grady, Kennedy. Passed balls— angham 3. Time— I hour. 30 minutes 
Umpire -John J Raftery. 



To»ala, 

Innings. 
M.A, C.. 
Springfield T. S., 

Runs— Martin 3, Hunt, Ingham 2, Clark, Kennedy 2. Cobb, Purinton, 
Metzdorf. Hawks 2. Lowman. Jones, Carrell. Total bases— Amherst 17, 
Springfield 8. Sto'en bases— Hunt, Ingham 2, Cobb. Sacrifice hit— Tlr- 
rell. Two-base hits— Martin, G. Cobb, Lowman. Carrell. First base on 
balls— off G. Cobb. Cobb, Purintoa; off Metzdorf, Martin. Tirrell. Clark. 
Struck— by G. Cobb, Cobb. Turner 2. Hawks. Lowman, Hill 3, Jones, 
Coociwln ; by Metzdorf. O'Grady, Clark, Kennedy. Batters hit— Ingham, 
Cobb, Purinton. Double play— Martin to Hunt toTirrel!. Passedball— 
Jones. Wild pitch— Metzdorf. Time— 1 hour. 30 minutes. Umpire- 
John J. Raftery. 

M. A. C, 5; Boston College, 0. 

On June 1st the team easily defeated Boston col- 
lege in Northampton. The contest was a clean one 
throughout and was a pretty one to watch, being much 
more interesting than the score would indicate. It 
was a pitchers battle in which Kennedy had considera- 
bly the better of the argument, holding the Boston 
players down to three scattered hits. 

The score : — 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



n! 



M. A. C. 



Tlrrell, 1 , 
Hunt, 2. 
Ingham, c. 
Cobb. 3, 
O'Grady. r, 
Shattuck. 1, 
Clark, m, 
Kennedy, p, 
Draper, a. 

Totals, 



Green, 3, 
Cox. s. 
Orchard, 2, 
Kelly, c. 
Lyon, p, 
Galvln, 1, 
Wheatly, r, 
Flatley, I. 
McGinnls. m, 

Totals. 
Innings, 
M. A. C. 

Boston College, 



A.B. 

4 
5 
6 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



B. 

I 

1 

2 

I 



1 

2 



I 



P.O. 
8 
1 

8 

1 

3 
2 
2 






I 

3 




S 

3 
2 
I 



38 

BOSTON COLLBOB. 
A.B, 

4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



27 



P.O. 
2 
1 
2 
6 
1 

7 
2 
1 
2 



12 



A, 

1 
2 
I 


2 

1 


3 



2 






3 






30 

4 5 

1 





6 





24 


9 5 


7 
1 



8 9 

2 - 5 

0—0 



drive to second base which was errored. Ingham and 
Cobb both filed out to Hamilton ending the game. 
The features wero the batting of Ehmke and the field- 
ing of Hamilton, Martin and Shattuck. 
The score : — 



BROWN. 



Runs— Ingham 2. Cobb, O'Grady, Clark, Sacrifice hits— Cobb, Kennedy. 
Two base h't— Draper. Stolen bases— Ingham 2, Cobb, Draper, Lyon ; 
First base on balls— Kennedy 2, Lvon 3. Struck out— Kennedy 7, Lyon 5. 
Passed balls— Kelly 3, Inghrm. Wild pitches— Kennedy. Lyon 3. Time— 
1 hour. 1 5 minutes. Attendance— 1 5o. Umpire— Raftery. 

Brown, II ; M. A. C, 1. 

The last game of the season resulted in a victory 
to Brown 1 1 - 1 . Brown found Kennedy for ten hits 
while M. A. C. could only get four hits during the 
game. In the first inning neither side scored. In 
the last of the second Dickinson got to first on Hunt's 
error. Elrod hit to' Kennedy who tried to force Dick- 
inson out but Martin errored. A pass by Ingham 
advanced both men. Sweeney got to first on Ken- 
nedy's error, Dickinson scoring. Ehmke got to first 
on Cobb's error. On Hoge's long fly to Shattuck, 
Sweeney scored. Ehmke scored on Jones hit . 
Higglns then fled to Martin and Paine was put out by 
Tirrell. In the third there was no scoring but in the 
fourth hits by Hoye, Jones, Higginsand Paine scored 
two men for Brown. In the sixth Brown again scored 
one run. 

Hamilton started the seventh Inning for Brown by 
hitting safely but was thrown out at second by Ingham 
on his attempt to steal. Dickinson hit safely and 
stole second. Elrod walked and he and Dickinson 
worked a double steal, both scoring on Sweeney's hit. 
Ehmke 's three bagger scored Sweeney. On Hoye's 
fly to left field, Ehmke scored. Jones struck out end- 
ing the Inning. M. A. C's. only run was made in the 
ninth. Martin started this Inning by flying out. 
Tlrrell hit safely, stole second and scored on Hunt's 













B.H. 


P.O. 




A. 


1. 












1 


1 




I 















2 


2 
7 




1 
















1 


2 




1 















1 


5 




















1 


4 




2 


2 















6 







1 












1 























2 























mm 


•■M 




— 


■BJBj 












10 


27 




6 


3 






M. A. 


c. 




B.N. 







1 



1 

4 


P.O. 

4 
9 
1 

4 
2 

3 



24 




A. 

2 
1 
2 
2 
I 



1 
1 

9 


B. 
1 



1 



1 




1 
1 

4 


l 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 







4 





2 





1 


4 







■II 


























1- 


■ 1 



Hoye, 3, 
Jones, s, 
riigglns, c, 
Paine, r, 
Hamilton. I. 
Dickinson, 2, 
Elrod. 1. 
Sweeney, m, 
Ehmke, p. 

Totals, 



Martin, 2, 
Tlrrel!. 1, 
Hunt, a, 
Ingham, c, 
Cobb, 3. 
O'Grady, r, 
Shattuck, I, 
Mark, m, 
Kennedv, p, 

Totals, 

Innings. 
Brown. 
M. A. Cm 

Runs made— by Hoye, Jones. Dickinson 2, Elrod 2. Sweeney 2 Ehmke 
3. Tlrrell. Two-base hit— Ehmke. Stolen basea— Dickinson 2, Elrod, 
Ehmke. First base on balls— off Ehmke. off Kennedy 4. Struck out— by 
Ehmke 6. by Kennedy 5. Sacrifice hit— Jones. Double plays— Jones to 
Dickinson to Elrod. Paine to Elrod, Hunt to Martin. Hit by pitched ball— 
Higglns. Passed balls— Higglts, Ingham. Umpire— McAleer. Time— 
1 hour, 25 minutes. 

Freshman Victorious. 

On the afternoon of June 9th, the Freshmen easily 
defeated the Sophomores 10-6. The game was 
remarkably clean for a class game and was Interesting 
to watch. The Freshmen started the first inning by 
hitting Whitney hard scoring three runs. Again In 
the third they got three runs by hitting hard. Cobb 
pitched an excellent game for the Freshmen and 
although he had poor support by his catchers he struck 
out 16 men. He also played a strong Individual game 
getting two put outs and six assists. The Sophomores 
were weak at hitting, getting only four hits off Cobb 
and one two bagger. The one Interesting feature of 
the game was a catch by Jones In centre field which 
not only surprised Jones but every one else. 

The score : — 





PRBSHMRN, 












A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


O'Grady, 1, 


5 


1 





1 





Cobb, p, 


5 


2 


2 


6 


1 


Warner, m, 


5 


1 


1 





1 


Stuck. 3. 2. 


5 








1 





Johnson, 1, 


5 








1 





Draper, a, 


5 


4 








2 


Bates, c, 3. 


5 





12 


1 


2 


Chase, 1, 


5 





8 





1 


Blake. 2, 














2 


Pagllery, c, 


2 





4 


1 


1 



Totals, 



45 



27 



11 



10 



I 



■ 



I 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Peters. I, 
Bartlett. c. 
Cutter, 2, 
Clark, m, 
Jones, m, 
Shaw, 3. 
Philbrick, $, 
Whitney, p, 
Hartford, I, 
Larnard, r, 
Hal', r, 

Totals, 
Innings, 
Freshman, 

Sophomores. 



SOPHOMOKSS. 

A.S. 

5 
5 
5 

3 
2 
5 

4 
4 
4 
2 






1 


I 


4 



I 







r.o. 

12 
10 



1 
1 
1 





1 



A. 

2 
2 

2 



3 
I 

2 
I 






2 






3 





41 

4 5 

3 

3 



6 
2 
2 



27 

7 





13 II 

8 9 
1 1 — 10 
1—6 



h.h^!7^ °i rtdy ii ^ £i Wai ? er 2 : J° hn »on. Draper, Peters 2, Shaw, 
S5S S 2p 4 rn i rdl S^'tee hit-Warner. Stolen bases-O'Crady 3, 
Oe>M>, Warner 3, Draper, Bates, Peters 2, Philbrick. Hartford. Two-base 
t'^F', , Bar,le "- Three-base hlt-Cobb. First base on balls-off 
hv r!EZ ia 'u ft u 0n 1 . bases 7 Fr ff hmen 8 ' Sophomores 10. Struck out- 
9^i^i 'ii' by ^ M, . n< 2 r ,0 1I H'">ypltcher-Phl'brick, Hartford, Bates. 
Time— I hour, 45 minutes. Umpire— Cook. 



Collet Not«$. 



—Several prospective freshmen have visited col- 
lege recently. 

—Prof. Babson will spend his summer in Ger- 
many, studying. 

—Our old friend Dan Hart has been very ill but is 
slowly improving. 

—The faculty decided to give a week for examina- 
tions, after due forethought. 

—Lyman, '05, worked at the West Experiment 
Station during his senior vacation. 

— A scrub team from the college played at Ludlow 
on Decoration day. We will not give the score. 

—The college band gave a concert on the campus 
last Friday evening. There will be one more concert 
before commencement. 

—We are all glad to see that the numerous holes 
on the football field have been filled so the field will 
be In first class condition for next fall. 

—There was a meeting of the propective football 
team for the purpose of measuring each man for a 
uniform next fall. Nearly twenty attended. 

—The senate for 1905-1906 has been chosen. 
The officers and members are : President, Ralph W. 
Peaks, '06 ; vice-president, Richard Wellington, '06 ; 
secretary, Earle G. Bartlett, '07 ; Harry M. Wood,' 
'06, Frank H. Kennedy, '06, Frederick C. Peters^ 
'07, Edwin D. Philbrick, '07, and Henry T. Pierce' 
'07. 



— Major Aderson resigned his position as military 
instructor at the college but will return for two weeks 
in the fall. No new instructor has been chosen as 
yet. 

— The Seniors appeared at the chapel exercises the 
morning of the 13th for the last time. They were 
cheered very earnestly by the rest of the student body 
at the close of services. 

— The cadets were inspected by Major Rowan 
June 2nd. The Inspection consisted of a battalion 
drill and review after which the rifles were examined. 
The drill lasted from nine to half after ten. 

— The college grounds are looking very neat this 
spring. Professor Brooks has had two rubbish boxes 
placed at convenient places, one behind North and 
the other behind South college and the experiment 
has proved a great success. 

— The baseball at a recent meeting elected F. H. 
Kennedy of Ashmont, captain, and F. A. Cutter of 
Pelham, N. H.. manager for next season. At a 
mass meeting of the students T. A. Barry of Amherst 
was elected assistant manager. 

— Professor and Mrs. Waugh have gone to attend 
the commencement exercises at the Kansas State 
college. Neither have been there since their gradua- 
tion. Professor Waugh will give the alumni speach. 
They will remain away from Amherst two weeks and 
we all wish them a very pleasant journey. 

— At a recent meeting of the Senate the chang- 
ing of the annual class rush was discussed nothing 
definite was decided upon but Indications are that 
some form of rush will be adopted before the end of 
this year. The needs of a new form of a rush has 
been evident for some years and every one will be 
glad to know that a start has been made. 

— The Senate has chosen the three sophomores 
who In their opinion are most eligible for the West- 
ern Alumni prize of $25. The names of the men 
will now go to a joint meeting of Senate and Faculty 
and one man will be selected. The sophomores 
chosen are, F. C. Peters of Lenox; H. T. Pierce 
of West Mlllbury, and J. N. Summers of Campsllo. 

— At a meeting of the M. A. C. chapter of ♦ K «t>, 
G.N. Willis, G. W. Patch, W. A. Munson, B. 
Tupperand Miss M. L. Sanborn were elected from 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•73 



the senior class. A. V. Osmun was also -hosen for 
excellent work in post graduate work. The election 
. of two juniors to the chapter had to be postponed 
until next fall as the junior marks of this semester 
have not as yet been handed in. 

—As a result of the defeat of the sophomores by 
the freshman class the sophomores desired to take 
revenge upon their conquerors, and accordingly they 
took up their old means of hazing. This was done by 
ducking freshmen in the pond. This was bad enough 
in itself, but not content with what few freshmen they 
could easily lay hold of, they proceeded to break 
Into a private house' and breaking open windows, to 
secure freshmen. The people owning the property 
considered this an outrage that should be punished by 
local authorities, and turned the matter over to 
Acting President W. P. Brooks, through whose efforts 
the affair was settled satisfactorily. 



Mr. J. A. Anderson 
Mr. Davenport 
Mr. A. Farrar 
Mr. Jennison 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1905. 

Manager Peakes has nearly completed the schedule 
for the coming season. Following are the games 
already arranged i 

Sept. 23. Holy Cross at Worcester. 

Sept. 30. Dartmouth at Hanover. 

Oct. 4. Brown at Providence. 

Oct. 7. Rhode Island State at Amherst. 

Oct. II. Williams at Willlamstown. 

Oct. 14. New Hampshire State at Amherst. 

Oct. 21. Bates at Lewiston. 

Oct. 28. Willlston at Amherst. 

Nov. 18. Springfield Training School at 
Springfield. 

Nov. 24. Tufts at Medford. 

Wesleyan and Amherst are missing and New 
Hampshire State, Bates and Willlston have been 
added. 



THIRTY-FIFTH COMMENCEMENT. 

Sunday, June 18th. 
Baccalaureate sermon by the Rev. Calvin Stebblns of 
Framingham, 10-45 a. m. 

Monday. June 19th. 
Annual meeting of the Phi Kappa Phi. 2 p. m. 
The Flint Prize Oratorical Contest, Junior Class, 3-30 p. 11. 

Speakers. 
Mr. Carpenter Mr. Hayward 

Mr. Craighead Mr. Moseley 

Mr. Gaskill Mr. Peakes 

Open Air Concert by the Cadet Band. 7 p. u. 
The Burnham Prize Speaking, Freshman Class, 8 p. u. 

Speakers. 

Mr. Larsen 
Mr. Waugh 
Mr. White 
Mr. Whitmarsh 
Tuesday, June 20th. 
Annual Meeting of the Trustees in the office of the Hatch 

Experiment Station, 9-30 a. m. 
Alumni Meeting in the Mathematical Room. 10-30 a. m. 
Meeting of the Committee on Experiment Department at 
the office of the Hatch Experiment Station. 1 1-30 a. m. 
Class Day exercises, 1-30 p. m. 

Speakers. 
Mr. Allen Mr. Tupper 

Mr. Barnes Mr. Willis 

Mr Hunt Mr. Yeaw 

Battalion Parade. Battalion Drill, 4 p. u. 
Suppers of the Various Classes, 6 p. m. 
Reception of President and Trustees, 8 to 10 p. m. 
Senior Promenade in Drill Hall, 10 p. m. 

Wednesday, June 21st. 

Graduation Exercises. Announcement of Prizes and Con- 
ferring of Degrees, 10 a. m. 

Commencement Address by Pres. W. E. Stone, class of '82, 
of Purdue University. 

Entitled to Commencement Appointments. 



STUDENTS ATTENTION. 

We have been asked to call attention to the neces- 
sity of the students leaving instructions at the Post 
office in regard to the disposition of their mail during 
vacation. A great deal of annoyance to both the 
officials at the office and to the students will be 
obviated if you will give this your personal attention. 



Miss Cushman 
Mr. Thompson 
Mr. Swain 

immediately after graduation 



Mr. Taylor 
Mr. Lyman 
Mr. Adams 

Alumni Banquet, 12 m 
exercises. 

Thursday and Friday, June 22nd and 23rd. 
Examination of Candidates for Admission, at the Botanic 
Museum. 9 a. m. Two full days are required for 
examination. 

Alumni and Former Students are requested to enter 
their names on the register in the Reading Room of the 
Chapel-Library, as soon as possible after reaching 
Amherst, 






<* 



6/ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

On Saturday, June 3rd, from 4 till 9p,m,, the 
last informal dance was held In the Drill Hall. It was 
largely attended and an exceptionally good time 
was experienced. The informal committee is well 
pleased over the results of this year's informals. The 
attendance of many lower classmen has been particu- 
larly pleasing. 

Among those present were the following : Mr. and 
Mrs. Henri D. Haskins of Amherst; J. G. Cook and 
Miss Hastings of Fond du Lac, Wis. ; G. L. Jones 
and Miss Cowles of North Amherst; A. V. Osmun 
and Miss Latimer of Middletown, Ct. ; E. G. Proulx 
and Miss Proulx of Hatfield; W. V. Tower and Miss 
Tower of Smith ; E. A. Back and Miss Barrett of 
Northampton; R. C. Kibby and Miss Schell of 
Smith ; J. H. Allen and Miss Barker of Smith ; J. J. 
Gardner and Miss McGee of Amherst ; C. S. Hol- 
comb and Miss French of Smith ; J. F. Lyman and 
Miss Murless of Mt. Holyoke; E. W. Newhall Jr., 
and Miss Pierce of Smith; W. N. Sears and Miss 
Taylor of Indian Orchard ; A. N. Swain and Miss 
Lee of Mt. Holyoke; A. D. Taylor and Miss Clark of 
Smith; L. S. Walker and Miss Bates of Pelham ; 
C. L. Whltaker and Miss Dodge of Smith; P. F. 
Williams and Miss Woodworth of Mt. Holyoke; F. 
L. Yeaw and Miss Cooley of Smith; G. T. French 
and Miss Decker of Holyoke ; C. E. Hood and Miss 
Clark of Mt. Holyoke; H. M. Russell and Miss Cobb 
of Amherst ; H. A. Suhlke and Miss Holyoke of Hol- 
yoke ; W. O. Taft and Miss Sanborn of Salem j R. 
Wellington and Miss Farrar of Amherst ; H.H.Green 
and Miss Kane of Mt. Holyoke ; F. C. Peters and 
Miss Love of Mt. Holyoke; H. T. Pierce and Miss 
Hawley ot Amherst; E. H. Shaw and Miss Flagg of 
Smith ; C. Bates and Miss Fay of Northampton ; 
R. R. Blake and Miss Ripley of Smith; L. W. 
Chapman and Miss Burnham of Mt. Holyoke ; G. R. 
Cobb and Miss Bartlett of Amherst; R. E. Cutting 
and Miss McPherson of Mt. Holyoke; A. D. Farrar 
and Miss Wilson of Mt. Holyoke ; C. L. Flint and 
Miss Schauffler of Smith ; K. E. Gillett and Miss 
May of Smith; J. A. Hyslop and Miss Hawley of 
Amherst; R. H. Jackson and Miss Whittemore of 
Mt. Holyoke; J. R. Parker and Miss Mackleroy of 
Smith; R. D. Whitmarsh and Miss Mitchell ot Mt. 
Holyoke ; and V. J. Cobb and Miss Robinson of 
Smith. 



PRIZE SPEAKING PROGRAM. 

The Flint Prize Exhibition in Oratory, of the 
class of 1906, was held on Monday, June 19, 1905, 
in the Stone Chapel, at 3-30 P. M. 

MUSIC 

Afton Smith Hayward, Amherst 

College and After I 

Charles Walter Carpenter, Monson 

The Execution of Nathan Hale 

Louis Hale Moseley, .... Glastonbury, Conn. 

Theodore Roosevelt — The Liberty of the Individual 

MUSIC 

Ralph Ware Peakes, Newtonville 

Thos. DcQuincey — The Weakness of Man 

William Huntlie Craighead, Boston 

Booker T. Washington 

Edwin Francis Gaskill, Hopedale 

The Cost of the United States 

The Burham Prize Speaking, of the class of 1908, 
was held on Monday, June 19, 1905, In the Stone 
Chapel, at 8 P. M. 

MUSIC 

Herbert Linwood White, Maynard 

Hannibal to His Soldiers, — Livy 

Henry Milliken Jennison, Millbury 

Centralization in America, — Grady 

David Larsen, Bridgeport, Conn. 

A Message to Garcia, — Hubbard 

Allan Farrar, Amherst 

Mob Rule in Chicago, — Adapted 

MUSIC 

Raymond Dean Whitmarsh, Taunton 

Corruption in Municipal Government, — Parkhurst 

Stearns Lothrop Davenport, . . North Grafton 

The Voyage of the Fram, — Hunt 

Thomas Francis Waugh, ...... Worcester 

Freedom or Slavery, — P. Henry 

John Albert Anderson, .... North Brookfield 
Cuba and Spain, — Thurston 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



mr 



DR. WINTHR0P ELLSWORTH STONE. 

Dr. Winthrop Ellsworth Stone, president of Purdue 
University, who is to be the commencement orator at 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College, was born in 
Chesterfield, N. H., June 12, 1862, and he removed 
to Amherst in 1874. In this town he attended the 
public schools, entering the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College in 1878 and graduating In 1882. The same 
year he went to Mountainville, N. Y., as an assistant 
in a private experiment station conducted by Lawson 
Valentine of New York city. He remained there two 
years, returning to Amherst as an assistant chemist 
under Dr. Goessmann. In 1886 he entered the uni- 
versity at Goettingen, Germany where he studied for 
two years. At the completion of his course he 
received his degree as doctor of chemistry and accepted 
a position as a professor in the university at Knoxville, 
Tenn. In 1890 he was called to Purdue University at 
Lafayette, Ind., as professor of chemistry. He con- 
tinued In this line of work until 1900, when the death 
of President James H. Smart placed the chief duties 
of the university In his hands, Dr. Stone having served 
as its executive head during the months of Dr. 
Smart's failing health. On July 6, 1900, Dr. S*one 
was formally elected president and in this capacity he 
has continued up to the present time, a wideawake, 
energetic, progressive man of the 20th century. As 
a former Amherst resident his appearance at com- 
mencement will prove of considerable interest. 



CLASS OF 1900. 

The class of 1900 at the Massachusetts agricultural 
college have just had printed a class history contain- 
ing the individual records of the men of the class 
since graduation. The pamphlet is bound in maroon 
covers wfth white letters ; the pages are slip sheets, 
each sheet containing the history of one man, and are 
held In place by a white ribbon tie. On the cover 
are the words "1900 Class History" in large letters 
and the name of the college and town in small letters. 
Additions will be made every five years ; the additions 
to be made on slip sheets and Inserted in place. 
Copies will be sent to each member of the class, and 
one will be placed In the college library. 

A reunion of the class will be held at the Mt Toby 
house, Sunderland. Tuesday evening at 6. The 
class as graduated contained 21 members, 20 of 



whom are now living. Nine are living in Massachu- 
setts, three in New York city and one in each of the 
following states : Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maine, 
Louisiana, California, Wisconsin, Nebraska and one 
in Washington, D. C. Eight members have received 
higher degrees, one from Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, one from Yale, one from Brown, one from 
Harvard, two from University of Pennsylvania, one 
from University of Michigan and one from New York 
college of physicians and surgeons, while one more 
will receive a degree this year from the last-named 
college. Three members of the class hold the degree 
of doctor of medicine, two the degree of doctor of 
veterinary medicine, and three the degree of doctor 
of philosophy, two for work done in chemistry and one 
for work in entomology. Both veterinarians are In 
the United States department of animal industry, the 
three physicians are practicing, one of the chemists Is 
at the head of the chemical department of Colby col- 
lege, the other has been instructor at Yale college, 
but is now engaged under the Carnegie institute In 
special chemical research. The entomologist is in 
the United States department of entomology, and is 
on special investigations of the cotton boll weevil. Of 
the other members of the class two are chemists, 
both in experiment station work, one a botanist in 
experiment station work, one a civil engineer, one a 
draftsman, one a teacher in a public high school, one 
a machanic, one doing university work of a higher 
degree, and four engaged in farming. Of the latter, 
three are in Massachusetts and one in Wisconsin, one 
obtained possession of a runout farm In Marlboro four 
years ago and is demonstrating what scientific methods 
can do for the agricultural interests of the state. The 
old buildings were town down and new ones built, the 
land was cleaned up, plowed, drained and fertilized 
and its production has tripled In three years. 

Nine members of the class are marrried, three 
have one child each. The class cup, presented by 
the class to the first male chiid born to any member 
of the class, will be awarded this week to the son of 
Henry L. Crane of Ellis. 

The names and occupations of the class are as fol- 
lows : E. K. Atkins, civil engineer, Northampton ; 
Howard Baker, veterinarian, in the Inspection service 
of the United States department of animal Industry, 
iocated at Omaha, Neb. ; F. H. Brown, farmer, 




^ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Marlboro: M. A. Campbell, farmer, Townsend; Y. 
H. Canto, In New York College of Physicians and 
Surgeons; H. L. Crane, farmer, at Ellis; A. F. 
Frost, draftsman, New York city; R. D. Gilbert, 
chemist, at New Haven experiment station on spec- 
ial work under direction of the Carnegie institute; J. 
E. Halllgan, chemist, Louisiana experiment station ; 
A. A. Harmon, veterinarian, in employ of the United 
States department of animal industry at Washington, 
D. C. ; E. T. Hull, physician in Hudson-street hospi- 
tal, New York city; James Kellogg, chemist, Rhode 
Island experiment station; M. B. Landers, physician, 
Ludlow; J. B. Lewis, mechanic, East Bridgewater; 
A. C. Monahan, teacher mathematics and physics, 
Amherst high school; A. W. Morrill, in employ 
United States department of entomology at Dallas, 
Tex. ; M. H. Munson, farmer, Zenda, Wis. ; G. F. 
Parmenter, professor of chemistry at Colby college, 
Watervllle, Me.; F. G. Stanley, physician, Essex; 
A. M. West, botanist, California experiment station, 
Whlttier, Cal. 



REVIEW OF BASEBALL SEASON. 

The game with Brown closed one of the most suc- 
cessful season we have ever had. Playing colleges 
that have twice or three times our number of students 
and having money to hire coaches for the entire 
season, and having all the opportunities that we lack 
here, we have shown them that despite all our draw- 
backs we can put out a baseball team that would be a 
credit to any college. In the sixteen games played 
we won seven, had eighty-eight runs to our credit with 
ninety-nine against us. Trinity, Boston College, 
University of Rochester, Andover and Springfield 
Training School were unable to defeat us. Williams 
should be - . inhered among these but Williams could 
not see it In that way and took the game by pure rob- 
bery in the ninth inning, believing that the glory of 
winning from us would over balance the unfair means 
they made use of. Our fourth game with Springfield 
Training School was cancelled by Springfield, their 
reasons were given that, In as much as we had twice 
defeated them badiy, they could see no reason why 
they should be subjected to any further defeat at our 
hands. 

Following is given the schedule of the season with 
the results of the game : 



m. a. c. 

April 18. Wesleyan at Middletown. 2 

24. Holyoke at Holyoke, 3 

29. Holy Cross at Worcester. 2 
May 1. Colby on the campus, 5 

3. Trinity at Hartford, 1 

13. Uni. of Rochester on campus. 7 

17. Springfield T. S. on campus 6 

19. Dartmouth at Hanover. 2 

20. Williams at Wllliamstown, 3 

22. Andover at Andover, 1 1 

23. Boston College at Boston, 15 

24. Colby at Waterville. Me,, 1 

30. Springfield T. S. at Greenfield, 13 
30. Springfield T. S. at Greenfield. 9 

June 1. Boston College at Northampton, 5 

7. Brown at Providence, 1 



Opponent. 

9 
19 
10 
10 



1 

7 

5 

4 

3 

3 

5 

4 

8 

II 



Totals, 88 99 

The first few games were marked by the nervous- 
ness of lhe new men which was In a large measure 
responsible for our defeats, but as the season advanced 
this wore off and In its place came steady and heady 
playing except at rare Intervals. Much of this advance 
in playing is due to Capt. Kennedy. Throughout the 
season he worked hard and persistently without the 
much needed help of a coach to develop and 
bring out all possible material and the results of 
this work was noticed in the better playing toward the 
last of the season. Although at times Capt. Ken- 
nedy's work was not appreciated by the student body 
It now becomes apparent that he has done much to 
raise the standard of our athletics. Too much praise 
cannot be bestowed upon Manager Taft for his unself- 
ish and constant efforts to carry on a season that is 
noted for the lack of support given by the student body. 
To carry on a season In this college a manager must 
have the support of the entire student body in order to 
raise the necessary expenses. As we can receive no 
gate receipts this becomes apparent at once. At pres- 
ent there is over $300 out In taxes and yet our mana- 
ger has successfully carried on the season. Time 
after time has Manager Taft gone Into his own pocket 
to meet expenses trusting that the students would soon 
pay. But we are afraid that his confidence has been 
misplaced. You students claim that you are loyal 
sons of your Alma Mater and yet when it comes to a 
few dollars and cents you are found wanting. For 
such as you nothing but the worst can be said. In 
the few days that remain see to It that Manager Taft 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



receives your help. Not only will you help him per- 
sonally but the confidence in you will be gained by the 
, managers of future teams. 

Of the records of the individual players nothing bet- 
ter can be given than the batting and fielding averages 
that follow. * 

Individual batting averages of base ball team • 




M. A. 



PLAYERS 

AND 
POSITIONS 



W 

S 



00 
< 



m 






Walker 2b & 3b ... 

Ingham, c 

Martin, ss & 2b . . . . 

Hunt, ss & 2b 

O 'Grady, rf &|f .... 

Cobb, p & 3b 

Tirrell, lb 

Shattuck, If & 3b . . . 
Kennedy, p&rf (capt. 

Clark, cf 

Draper, ss 



3 10 
16 63 

15 55 

16 68 
16 60 
16 60 
16 62 
12 39 
15 49 
II 39 

7 20 





18 

12 

II 

8 

6 

9 

5 

6 

6 

2 



4 6 
23 28 



13 
15 
13 
12 
12 

6 

7 

5 

2 



14 

19 

15 

15 

16 

7 

7 

6 

3 





I 

1 



I 

1 

3 


2 
2 





2 

9 

4 

5 

7 

6 

4 

I 



4 

I 



.400 

.365 

.236 

.221 

.217 

.200 

.193 

.154 

.143 

.128 

.100 



PRESIDENT GOODELL. 

C. ALUMNI WILL LAUD HIS SERVICES TO THE 
COLLEGE. 

The executive committee of the M. A. C. associ- 
ate alumni has made arrangements to have the speak- 
ing after the alumni dinner refer to President Goodell 
and his long and faithful service to the college. Sir 
Chentung Liang Cheng, the Chinese minister, will be 
a guest of the association at the dinner, and after the 
banquet will pay a tribute to President Goodell 
Other speakers will be a member of the board of 
trustees, a member of the faculty, and graduates of 
the earlier and later classes. The association will 
Issue volume III. of the Alumni Monthly during the 
summer. This will contain a memorial to President 
Goodell, a sketch of the late Maj. Henry E. Alvord, 
an illustrated article on the new horticultural building 
and various alumni notes. 



Individual fielding averages of base ball team : 



PLAYERS 

AND 
POSITIONS 



W 
U 

2 
< 
O 



% 



14 



Tirrell, lb ... 

Ingham, c 

Clark, cf 

Hunt, ss & 2b 

Cobb, p & 3b , 

Martin, ss & 2b 

Shattuch, If & 3b 

Kennedy, p & rf (capt.) 
Walker, 2b & 3b .... 

Draper, ss 

O'Grady, rf & If 



16 121 7 4 

16 128 23 9 

II 14 3 1 

28 36 8 

19 47 12 

42 28 14 



16 
16 
15 
12 
15 
3 
7 
16 



19 5 

16 17 

5 5 

8 13 



5 
8 
3 
7 



.970 

.944 

.944 

.889 

.846 

.833 

.828 

.805 

.769 

.750 



13 2 10 .600 



Only two men will be lost by the going out of 1905 
and although we can ill afford to lose them, the pros- 
pects of next year's team is exceptionally bright 
Encouraged by this year's work and profiting by the 
few mistakes made during this season we ought to put 
out a team again that will elevate our athletic standard 



'04— E. S. Fulton has an article in the last annual 
report of the Hatch Experiment Station, entitled 
"The Digestibility of Galactan." 



FARMING CLASS OF CLERGYMEN. 

Several preachers of Hartford have formed a farm- 
ing class, and in the last week have begun to till the 
soil In and about Hartford. Director H. D. Hemen- 
way, M. A. C, '95, of the school of horticulture In 
this city, is the leader or the ministerial class and he 
will give It weekly instruction in the use of the hoe 
and spade during the coming summer. In the new 
class are, besides the clergymen, an English 
settlement worker, Mrs. C. A. Webster of London, 
who Is In America studying methods of social settle- 
ment work and who came on from Washington to 
spend several weeks here and to join the farming 
class; Prof. James E. Madlgan, principal of the 
Webster school in Waterbury, and two Hartford 
women who want to learn farming. 

The ministers in the class include Rev. Dr. John 
Coleman Adams of the church of the Redeemer ; 
Rev. Harold Pattlson of the First Baptist church \ 
Rev. Harry E. Peabody of the Windsor-avenue Con- 
gregational church and Rev. Elmer A. Dent of the 
South Park Methodist Episcopal church. 

The first practical lesson was given by Director 
Hemenway after he had lectured to the class. Each 
of the ministers Is supplied with pencil and paper 
and Is expected to take notes on the lectures so as to 
familiarize himself with the methods explained by 
Director Hemenway, and to be able to carry them 




if 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



out later. At the close of the lecture each of the 
preachers and the women members of the party was 
supplied with rake and hoe, and they were introduced 
to the scene of their summer labors, a garden at the 
back of the school, which was divided into plots for 
each of the workers. 

Director Hemenway then gave the word to break 
the sod and the members of the class struck out 
bravely with rake and hoe. Some used the rake 
and some the hoe and all employed considerable 
muscle. In most cases the ground showed little 
result for all the work, but Director Hemenway 
encouraged his laborers by telling them that the sod 
was easier to break after a rain. 

"I wish it had rained all last night." said one of 
the clergymen as he leaned on his rake, drew a long 
breath and passed his hand soothingly over the small 
of his back. The clods were hard and the work 
heavy, but each laborer was urged to get his tract 
ready for the seeds. 

In staking out their individual gardens Director 
Hemenway told his pupils that they could measure by 
the handle of their hoes, each of which was marked 
with foot measurements. "There are no measure- 
ments on my hoe," said one of the prominent pas- 
tors, critically examining the implement he held. 
"Tis a rake you've got, not a hoe," quietly remarked 
the director. "I declare you're right!" rejoined the 
clergyman as he looked again at the tool he had 
been using for fifteen minutes. 

Dfp&r'tmfiYf JSlo-t^s. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Work har been begun in excavating ground for the 
new horticultural building. If everything goes 
smoothly this building should be well on toward com- 
pletion when we come back in the fall so that many 
of the students who are in college will enjoy the 
benefits. 

The grounds and flower-beds around college have 
been put in their best form for commencement, add- 
ing much to the beauty for which M. A. C. Is noted. 

Congratulations are In order for the plant-house cat 
which has recently given birth to a happy family of 
five. 

Dr. Stone recently gave the Junior class in Botany 



a stereoptican lecture on the Pathology of Snade 
Trees and Their Management, showing slides from 
all parts of the state which gave an idea of the various 
causes of disease and death common to trees. It 
was a most valuable and interesting lecture. 
GEOLOGY. 

Another very instructive lantern-slide talk was 
given to the Juniors i,i Geology last week Wednesday 
by Dr. Lull, on Fossils and his trip to the West three 
summers ago. It showed the method of digging and 
shipping these interesting relics of old times as well 
as the romantic life of the geological explorers. 
AGRICULTURE. 

The department has recently received from the 
manufacturers a large collection of fruit packages 
which will be used in the pomology work. 

At the seminar held May 19, L. H. Moseley, '06, 
spoke on "Peach Growing." Mr. Moseley has lived 
where he could observe the methods of one of 
the most successful and extensive peach growers 
of New England and the South. His talk was 
enjoyed by all present. 

On Friday, June 9, the seminar was addressed by 
J. G. Cook, '03, who spoke on "Calf Feeding." 
His practical experience at the Hatch Experiment 
Station enabled him to speak in a most instructive 
manner. 



Alu 



mm. 



'87.— Dr. E. R. Flint is said to be exceedingly 
popular as professor of chemistry and college physic- 
Ian in the Florida State college. 

'95. — Married on March 21 at Greensburg, Pa., 
Robert S. Jones and Miss Elinor M. Etcher, Mr. 
Jones is now In charge of the construction of the 
large water Purification Works at Columbus, O. 

'95. — In the June number of the Cosmopolitan 
magazine Is to be found an article written by C. B. 
Lane on the subject » Butter, Cheese and Condensed 
Milk as Factory Products." 

Ex- '98 — F. H. Plumb recently secured through 
Hapgoods of New York, a good postion as engineer 
with Chas. Hoffer of New York. 

'99.— Prof. Dan A. Beamen of the Agricultural 
Department of the Ponce, P. R. Industrial School 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



\J\ 



is reported as doing excellent work. He extends his 
sympathy to the college and to the family of the late 
President Goodell. 

'99.— First Lieut. Wm. H. Armstrong, stationed 
at San Juan, P. R. ( has lately been detailed as 
Engineer Officer for the post of San Juan. He is 
also judge advocate of the G 3 neral Court Martial 
convened May 5, 1905. Mr. Armstrong was in 
Washington, D. C, on March 4 commanding a 
detachment of Porto Rican soldiers which marched 
In the Innaugural parade. 

'99.-Since Jan. I, 1905, D. A. Beaman, has 
been teaching in an agricultural school at Ponce, 
Porto Rico, under the direction of Robert Miller. 

'99.— A. A. Boutelle has recently changed his 
location from Leverett where he was engaged in the 
management of a large farm and is now associated 
with a brother In the conduct of an extensive dairy 
farm In Leominster. 

'"•— W. E. Chapin has had charge of the stamp 
cancellation In the Springfield post office. 

'99.— H. W. Dana is advertizing manager for 
Almy, Bigelow & Co., Salem. 

'99.— W. E. Hinds has been engaged with the 
government investigation of the cotton-boll weevil 
since 1902, In charge of the laboratory work. The 
headquarters has recently been moved to Dallas, Tex. 

'99.— W. A. Hooker, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Bureau of Entomology, Washington, D. C. 
During the past two months, Mr. Hooker has been 
stationed at Quincy Florida investigating the injury 
done by thrips to the shade-grown tobacco. He 
expects to be in Dallas, Tex., during the summer. 

'99.— Since June, 1899, G. C. Hubbard has 
carried on the old homestead at Plumtrees. His 
marriage to Miss Florence E. Graves of Sunderland 
took place early In May. 

'99.— H. E. Maynard has been engaged In electri- 
cal work since his graduation. Address, East 
Orange, N. J. 

'99.— M. H. Pingree, State College, Pennsylva- 
nia. Mr. Pingree has been First Assistant Chemist 
In the Pennsylvania station for some time. He had 
the sad misfortune to lose his little daughter, aged 
one and one-half years, last January. 



Young Men's Clothing 

With all the " Kinks of Fusbiou M 
»nd plenty of assortment .-. .-. 

THAT'S US. 



Spring fiki.d. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



Mam 



UP«TO«DATB 

Shoe Repairing Neatly Done. 

"TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 
Amhrrst, Mam. 



E. D. Philbrick, '07. 



Edwards, '08. 



A Full Line of 

Students' Supplies 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE, 

ROOM ai NORTH COLLEGE. 



I 



*• 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'99.— B. H. Smith, U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, Bureau of Chemistry, Washington, D. C. 
Since being engaged in the Insecticide and Mineral 
Water Laboratory, Mr. Smith has, by taking advan- 
tage of the night courses offered by some of the 
Washington Institution, earned and received the 
degrees of M. S. in chemistry and L. L. B. in law. 
He expects to leave Washington soon to take charge 
of a government Food Inspection laboratory In either 
Philadelphia or Chicago. 

"99.— S. E. Smith, Middlefield, Mass. has, until 
recently been Farm Superintendant for a Boys' 
Industrial Home Farm at Becket, Mass. The farm 
buildings were burned to the ground early in April 
and the school has been abandoned. 

'99. — F. H. Turner, Great Barrington, Mass. has 
been engaged in the hardware business since 1899. 
He has recently sold his interest in the firm of Piatt 
and Turner and bought out a competing firm, organ- 
izing under the firm name of F. H. Turner & Co, 
He now has one of the best hardware establishments 
In western Massachusetts. 

'99.— C. M. Walker, Amherst, Mass. has been 
engaged In the Cotton Boll Weevil Investigations in 
Texas. 

'01.— P. C. Brooks 6343 Yale Ave., Eaglewood 
Sta, Chicago, III. 

'02 — C. I. Lewis has resigned his position as Pro- 
fessor of Natural History and Agriculture at Alfred 
University, Alfred, N. Y. and expects to enter Cor- 
nell University this coming fall where he will take up 
graduate work. 

'03. — The engagement is announced of Elmer 
Meger Poole to Miss Ethel Clapp of New Bedford. 

'03.— C. Si Tinkham, i26 Thorton St., Roxbury, 
Mass., with the Mass. Highway, Commission. 

'03 — Albert Parsons of the Experiment Station 
has accepted a position as assitant superintendant at 
the celebrated Hood Farm, Lowell, Mass. 

'03 — Joseph G. Cook, will act as inspector of con- 
centrated feed stuffs, and as inspector of Babcock 
machines for the department of Foods and Feeding 
here at College. 

'04.— F. F. Henshaw, 29 Collins Place, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON, 

Clothiers, Hatters and Tailors. 

The largest stock and the lowest prices in town. 

Agents for the celebrated Guyer Hats and A. B. Klrsch- 

baum & Co. Clothing. 

MONARCH SHIRTS, PERRIN jmd H. P. GLOVES. 






SANDERSON c£ THOMPSON, 

AMHERST. 



Belle jgj Sweeis. 

WHAT ARE THEY? 
The best Confections made. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO., 

SOLE AHKNTS FOR AMHERST. 





PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., • 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS